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eBook Beyond Formulas in Mathematics and Teaching: Dynamics of the High School Algebra Classroom (Ways of Knowing in Science (Hardcover)) download

by Daniel Chazan

eBook Beyond Formulas in Mathematics and Teaching: Dynamics of the High School Algebra Classroom (Ways of Knowing in Science (Hardcover)) download ISBN: 0807739197
Author: Daniel Chazan
Publisher: Teachers College Press (January 21, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 1991
ePub: 1735 kb
Fb2: 1321 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mobi lrf doc azw
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Mathematics

Early Algebra Project. The majority of the respondents had only taken Algebra I as their most advanced course in high school, and approximately 40% of these participants had enrolled in lower level or what might be considered remedial level mathematics courses in college. Approximately 33% of the participants reported that they had mathematics anxiety and higher levels of mathematics anxiety led to decreased feelings of enjoyment about mathematics.

Start by marking Beyond Formulas in Mathematics and Teaching: Dynamics . The book examines in detail a teacher's evolving understandings of their students, algebra and teachers-student classroom roles.

Start by marking Beyond Formulas in Mathematics and Teaching: Dynamics of the High School Algebra Classroom as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Mathematics teaching would be better in general if more teachers worked through .

Mathematics teaching would be better in general if more teachers worked through the problems in this book. One person found this helpful. Beyond Formulas in Mathematics and Teaching: Dynamics of the High School Algebra Classroom (The Series on School Reform). Success from the Start: Your First Years Teaching Secondary Mathematics.

teaching: Dynamics of the high school algebra classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 23, 99-122 International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology. Leikin, . Berman, A. & Zaslavsky, O. (2000).

Beyond formulas in mathematics teaching: Dynamics of the high school algebra classroom. New York: Teachers College. Cobb, . Yackel, . & Wood, T. (1992). Educational Studies in Mathematics, 23, 99-122. Franke, M. Carpenter, T. Levi, . & Fennema, E. (2001). Capturing teachers’ generative change: A follow-up study of professional development in mathematics. International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology. Learning through teaching: The case of symmetry.

Beyond Formulas in Mathematics and Teaching Dynamics of the High School Algebra Classroom The Serie.

Beyond formulas in mathematics and teaching: dynamics of the high school algebra classroom. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 12, 145–182. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. New York: Teachers College Press. Stephan, . McClain, K. & Gravemeijer, K.

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Christian Science Monitor This book supports the need for, and indeed . 3 Florian Cajori, 1890, The Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States, Bureau of Education, Circular of Education, No. 3, p. 106.

Christian Science Monitor This book supports the need for, and indeed the educational benefits of, changing profes- sional teaching conditions for . It provides some food for thought for every- one involved in improving mathematics education. teachers in the study did not show this confidence and capacity.

4 Why we teach mathematics? Mathematics is a human activity which . skills The Socratic Method is a fun yet educational way to teach your students how to make use of their knowledge.

4 Why we teach mathematics? Mathematics is a human activity which arises from experiences and becomes an integral part of culture and society, of everyday work and life. The Socratic Method also teaches students how to think critically, accept others' opinions or viewpoints, and apply their knowledge to the real world and to other forms of knowledge.

Algebra IS a basic math skill . Algebra is about rearranging problems until you can solve them using arithmetic. It is a completely natural, obvious next step after teaching arithmetic. Algebra exposes students to logical problem solving and teaches abstract thinking. This enables them to decide whether these are subjects that interest them. Some decide to use these skills to pursue careers in law or medicine. Others learn higher math for careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). Everyone else learns these are things they do not ever want to do because they hate algebra, which is perhaps the most valuable lesson of all. 454 views · View 3 Upvoters.

Based on the author's experience as a researcher and teacher of lower-track students, Beyond Formulas in Mathematics and Teaching illuminates the complex dynamics of the algebra classroom. From within this setting, Daniel Chazan thoughtfully explores topics that concern all dedicated educators -- how to really know one's students, how to find engaging material, and how to inspire meaningful classroom conversations. With an eye to ways of restructuring roles and relationships, this volume is essential reading for educators seeking to enhance their teaching practices and understanding of students who may be estranged from school.
Comments: (2)
Xmatarryto
Chazan is a deeply ambivalent reporter on the uncertain task of teaching. It is unreasonable in his view to conceive of mathematics as certain and distinct from scientific or especially historical knowledge. It is also unreasonable to rely on the common sense that underlies much teaching, curriculum scope and sequence as well as typical descriptions of student abilities and motivations. One major "take away" from this book is that simplistic claims for reform are not warranted. The effectiveness of a teaching technique, curriculum or textbook depends on a host of factors. Within the classroom itself, the interaction among teacher, students and curriculum is already quite complex. Beyond that, the students come from a larger community, the teachers work within a larger institution and curricula are often in flux or are undergoing reform. This is why recent attempts to make educational research more "scientific" and to concentrate on simple pronouncements of "what works" have been opposed by many of us concerned with understanding classroom practice as a social setting.

Recent research and theory regarding the teaching of mathematics has directed us toward classroom environments characterized by more conversation, and more attention to students' expressed understanding of mathematics. But following these recommendations entails a thorough reexamination of the whole practice of teaching, extending to our understanding of mathematics itself.

Autobiography is appropriate here, because any understanding of teaching practice entails personal reflection around particular decisions made in the day to day hubbub of teaching. The theoretical task is to make these particular events more generally relevant through exposition.

There are no other thorough accounts of high school mathematics teaching anything like this book. If you are or are becoming a mathematics teacher, designer of curriculum or mathematics teacher educator, this book is highly recommended.
Sharpmane
Algebra will almost always be a tool of everyday life, not a discipline in and of itself. This book makes it very clear that algebra must be made relevant to the student and admittedly a few sparse examples of relevant examples are provided. The book would be vastly more useful if it made its point quickly and followed with an exhaustive compendium of real-world examples of algebra in every day life. Then it would be a very useful resource for teachers who have a like mind. Also, the autobiographical nature of the presentation was not necessary and the book would have been more interesting if it had been abbreviated.