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eBook Logic: Study Guide download

by Robert Baum

eBook Logic: Study Guide download ISBN: 0195155823
Author: Robert Baum
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 4 edition (December 20, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 180
ePub: 1134 kb
Fb2: 1863 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: txt doc txt lrf
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Mathematics

The text addresses all the basic concepts of logic, including informal For more than twenty tears, introductory logic students have relied on this text to provide clear lessons in logic as well as practical applications of the discipline.

Robert Baum's "Logic" does an okay job when covering Aristotelean logic and propositional argument. The cartoons that Baum intersperses every few pages are funny, but they are not worth the cost of purchasing the book. 2 people found this helpful. However, its attempt to show how to construct proofs in the predicate calculus is too brief and confusing. Although I taught symbolic logic at the college level for almost two decades, I found following what Baum says to be difficult. I also found his section in informal fallacies to be incomplete and brief.

Robert Baum emphasises formal logic and. Oxford University Press USA (1995). Similar books and articles. Robert Baum - 1975 - Holt, Rinehart and Winston. For more than twenty years, introductory logic students have relied on this text to provide clear lessons as well as practical applications of the discipline. Robert Baum emphasises formal logic and utilizes such elements of popular culture as cartoons and advertisements to illustrate technical concepts. Robert Baum - 1995 - Oup Usa. The Power of Logic. Frances Howard-Snyder - 2012 - Mcgraw-Hill.

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Robert Baum, Ohio State University. Because Without Cause.

It guides us to convert our fears into allies in public speaking or during an argument. A master of logic, the book is thought-provoking and highly informative to persuade you to reverse the way you look at the world

It guides us to convert our fears into allies in public speaking or during an argument. 7. A Rulebook for Arguments by Anthony Weston. A Rulebook for Arguments is a succinct introduction to the art of writing and assessing arguments, organized around specific rules. A master of logic, the book is thought-provoking and highly informative to persuade you to reverse the way you look at the world.

Student Guide to Robert Frost by Hope, Warren (Hardback book, 2004). Logic: Study Guide by Robert Baum (English) Paperback Book Free Shipping!

Student Guide to Robert Frost by Hope, Warren (Hardback book, 2004).

For more than twenty tears, introductory logic students have relied on this text to provide clear lessons in logic as well as practical applications of the discipline.

For more than twenty tears, introductory logic students have relied on this text to provide clear lessons in logic as well as practical applications of the discipline. Baum emphasizes formal logic and uses such elements of popular culture as cartoons and advertisements to illustrate technical concepts. The text addresses all the basic concepts of logic, including informal analysis of statements and arguments, Aristotelian logic, propositional logic, quantificational logic, enumerative induction, the scientific method, probability, informal fallacies, definitions, and applied logic.
Comments: (7)
Detenta
4 starts only because the glow of the book was a little difficult to follow. Google and context clues were the best for words I did not know that were not in the glossary. Did it's job. Not a book you can teach yourself out of if you are taking an online class. Write down questions and ask the instructor next class time. If you are not a math native, this can be like learning a new language. Not impossible to do, just difficult.
Fek
This book gives all the even answers and shows all the work! Amazing to follow along with or to aid in teaching. Seller was a little slow with delivery taking the latter of the shipping time. Book was new and in great condition. I would recommend this book to anyone needing extra practice
Zorve
Really bad book
Hunaya
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Very Old Chap
This logic text by Robert Baum is uneven in its coverage of the essentials of formal and informal logic. For example, he does an acceptable (though not great) job when covering Aristotelian logic and propositional arguments. However, when it comes to the predicate calculus, the attempt to show how to construct proof is too brief and confusing. I taught predicate logic for two decades at the college level and I found Baum's attempt to present the issues to be confusing.

Also, the section on informal fallacies is incomplete and brief. In addition, there are some real problems in his classifications of these arguments. For example, he has the title of "Valid but Fallacious Arguments" when discussing inductive arguments such as hasty generalization. However, the concept of validity applies only to deductive arguments, not inductive arguments.

For the most part the cartoons found every few pages provide some humorous relief, but do little to add to the value of the text.
Well, at least the cartoons that are found every few pages are reasonably funny.
Uyehuguita
Robert Baum's "Logic" does an okay job when covering Aristotelean logic and propositional argument. However, its attempt to show how to construct proofs in the predicate calculus is too brief and confusing. Although I taught symbolic logic at the college level for almost two decades, I found following what Baum says to be difficult.

I also found his section in informal fallacies to be incomplete and brief. And I was left scratching my head at his title, "Valid but Fallacious Arguments." when discussing such fallacies as that of hasty generalization, which is a type of inductive argument, whereas the concept of validity applies only to deductive arguments.

Well, at least the cartoons that are found every few pages are reasonably funny.
Kulabandis
"Logic," by Robert Baum, is adequate when covering Aristotelean logic and propositional logic. However, its practice of discussing "statements" and "arguments" in separate chapters catches up with it when dealing with "quantificational logic." Accordingly, its attempt to show how to construct proofs when working with the predicate calculus is confusing (and much too brief). Although I have taught symbolic logic for nearly two decades, I find it difficult to follow what Baum is saying at this point.

Those who want to include a section on informal fallacies in their course will find Baum's discussion to be brief and incomplete. Moreover, for some reason he lists these fallacies in a section that he titles, "Valid but Fallacious Arguments." Uh, I'm not sure how (for example) the fallacy of hasty generalization fits in, seeing that it is a type of inductive argument and the concept of validity applies only to deductive arguments. This is misleading at best.

The cartoons that Baum intersperses every few pages are funny but not worth the purchase price of the book.
"Logic," by Robert Baum, does in a very average way what some other texts do much better. For those looking for an excellent logic text I would refer them to Hurley's "A Concise Introduction to Logic," which despite its title, is complete and sufficiently detailed, or Howard-Snyder and Wasserman, "The Power of Logic." (Earlier editions of the latter text were written by Stephen Layman.)

The Baum text is adequate when covering Aristotelean logic and propositional logic. However, its practice of discussing "statements" and "arguments" in separate chapters catches up with it when dealing with "quantificational logic" (the predicate calculus). Accordingly, its attempt to show how to construct proofs when working with the predicate calculus is confusing (and way too brief). Although I have taught symbolic logic for nearly two decades, I find it difficult to really follow what Baum is saying at this point.

For those who want to include a section on informal fallacies in their course, they will find Baum's discussion to be brief and incomplete. Moreover, for some strange reason he lists these fallacies in a section that he titles, "Valid but Fallacious Arguments." Uh, I'm not sure how (for example) the fallacy of hasty generalization fits in, seeing that it is a type of inductive argument and the concept of validity applies only to deductive arguments. This is misleading at best.

The cartoons that Baum intersperses every few pages are funny, but they are not worth the cost of purchasing the book.