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by B. F. Leach,A. S. Boocock

eBook Prehistoric Fish Catches in New Zealand (British Archaeological Reports British Series) download ISBN: 0860547434
Author: B. F. Leach,A. S. Boocock
Publisher: British Archaeological Reports (July 15, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 38
ePub: 1369 kb
Fb2: 1325 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: txt lit azw mbr
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Earth Sciences

British Archaeological Reports. BAR –S584, 1993 Prehistoric Fish Catches in New Zealand by B. F. Leach and A. S. Boocock. ISBN 0 86054 743. 4. £2. 0.

British Archaeological Reports. Gordon House, 276 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7ED, England Tel +44 (0) 14 Fax +44 (0) 31 archaeoaeopress. Titles in print december 2014 bar international series. The BAR series of archaeological monographs were started in 1974 by Anthony Hands and David Walker. From 1991, the publishers have been Tempus Reparatum, Archaeopress and John and Erica Hedges. Gordon House, 276 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7ED, England Tel +44 (0) 14 Fax +44 (0) 31 baraeopress. Titles in print december 2013 bar international series. uk or online at ww. adrianbooks. uk and ww. rchaeopress. com 1. British Archaeological Reports.

Series: British Archaeological Reports (BAR) International Series Volume: 584. By: BF Leach and AS Boocock. Evidence for the fish catches of pre-European Maori people derived from archaeological sites

Series: British Archaeological Reports (BAR) International Series Volume: 584. Publisher: BAR Publishing. Evidence for the fish catches of pre-European Maori people derived from archaeological sites. Text summarises the results which are presented in 240pp on fiche. Series: British Archaeological Reports (BAR) International Series Volume: 584. Other titles in British Archaeological Reports (BAR) International Series.

Founded in 1974, the BAR series is the largest series of academic archaeology in the world, covering all major aspects of academic archaeology worldwide

Prehistoric fish catches in New Zealand. BF Leach, AS Boocock. British Archaeological Reports Limited, 1993. A guide to the identification of fish remains from New Zealand archaeological sites.

Prehistoric fish catches in New Zealand. Archaeozoology Laboratory, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, 1997. A stochastic approach to the reconstruction of prehistoric human diet in the Pacific region from bone isotope signatures. BF Leach, CJ Quinn, GL Lyon.

Leach, B. Foss and Boocock, . Prehistoric Fish Catches in New Zealand. The Mesolithic in Ireland: Hunter-Gatherers in an Insular Environment. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports (British Series 58). Woodman, . Excavations at Mount Sandel 1973–77. BAR International Series 584. Oxford: Tempus Reparatum.

International Archaeological Reports since 1974. Publication Year: 1993.

Prehistoric fishing strategies on themakateaisland of Rurutu. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports British Series 196, pp. 361–7. Archaeology in Oceania, Vol. 45, Issue. British Archaeological Reports International Series 973. Oxford: Archaeopress. Animal remains from the Avar Period cemetery of Budakalász-Dunapart.

and Boocock, A. 1995 We evaluate this method using six modern and five archaeological datasets from northern New Zealand for a key commercial and artisanal species, Australasian. 1995. Estimating live fish catches from archaeological bone fragments of snapper Pagrus auratus. Tuhinga: Records of the Museum of New Zealand 3: 1-28. We evaluate this method using six modern and five archaeological datasets from northern New Zealand for a key commercial and artisanal species, Australasian snapper or silver seabream (Pagrus auratus).

Prehistoric monuments in England, Scotland, and Wales

Prehistoric monuments in England, Scotland, and Wales. Who built them and why? Stone circles, barrows, hill figures. Long barrows These are Neolithic (New Stone Age) tombs which are roughly contemporary with the causewayed camps. There are two main types of long barrows; those made entirely of earth, called, you guessed it, earthen long barrows, and those made with a chamber of large stones, called megalithic or chambered long barrows. There are thousands of hill forts throughout the British Isles in various stages of repair, though the most spectacular is without a doubt Maiden Castle in Dorset, while Uffington in Oxfordshire (just above the White Horse) is well worth a visit.

Evidence for the fish catches of pre-European Maori people derived from archaeological sites. Text summarises the results which are presented in 240pp on fiche.