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eBook The Earth in Turmoil: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Their Impact on Humankind download

by Kerry Sieh,Sifu Simon LeVay

eBook The Earth in Turmoil: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Their Impact on Humankind download ISBN: 0716736519
Author: Kerry Sieh,Sifu Simon LeVay
Publisher: W. H. Freeman; 1st edition (September 15, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 324
ePub: 1344 kb
Fb2: 1965 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mobi lrf rtf lit
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Earth Sciences

The book uses earthquakes and volcanoes in the US as its source material. The writing style is clear and approachable. All in all a very enjoyable read for folks with a serious interest in Earth Science.

The book uses earthquakes and volcanoes in the US as its source material. The best examples may not always be taken from the 50 States, but an American audience is likely to find it more interesting. Lastly, Fradkin, in "Magnitude 8", doesn't seem to think scientists know how to communicate. This book is a counterexample in eactly the same area he's writing about. 3 people found this helpful.

The book takes a virtual field trip across the United States, visiting sites . The centennial of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake is a natural time to reflect on the past, present, and future of seismology.

The book takes a virtual field trip across the United States, visiting sites including the Cascadia subduction zone, the San Andreas fault, the Long Valley caldera, the Basin and Range, New Madrid, and Hawaii. The Earth crust in polar areas is compressing with increasing of angular velocity of rotating planet, and it is extensible in the equator zone. The decreasing of rotation velocity leads to opposite result. We've come far in little more than the hundred years since the first seismometers were developed in the late 1800's.

The Earth in Turmoil book. The Earth in Turmoil describes earthquakes and volcanoes from the point of view of scientists who are trying to understand their causes and forecast future activity. Volcanologists risk their lives to scoop samples from an erupting volcano's throat. Geologists scratch at the desert floor, looking for traces of ancient tremors.

The Earth in Turmoil: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Their Impact on Humankind, by Kerry Sieh and Sifu Simon LeVay, . Freeman, 1999, ISBN 978-0716736516. Natural Hazards and Disasters, by Donald Hyndman and David Hyndman Thomson Brooks/Cole, 2010, ISBN 978-0538737548.

Exploring natural hazards in the .

Simon LeVay at the 2010 Texas Book Festival. Sieh K, LeVay, S (1998). The Earth in Turmoil: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Their Impact on Humankind.

New Biological Books. Kerry Sieh, Simon LeVay. Robert B. Olshansky, "The Earth in Turmoil: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Their Impact on Humankind.

The Earth in Turmoil: Earthquakes and Volcanos and Their Impact on Humankind" with Simon LeVay. W. H. Freeman & Sons (1998). National Academies Press (2003). "Kerry Sieh :: Division of Geology and Planetary Sciences at Caltech". Archived from the original on 2013-03-25. Retrieved 2013-11-02. a b BSSA (January 6, 2014)

Kerry Sieh, Simon LeVay, 1998 3 rd floor Science and Technology Library Call number: QE535.

Kerry Sieh, Simon LeVay, 1998 3 rd floor Science and Technology Library Call number: QE535. Exploring natural hazards in the .

The Earth in Turmoil is the account of what we now know about volcanoes and earthquakes. Exploring natural hazards in the U.S. region by region, it combines lively accounts of past disasters with expert predictions for the future, including a final chapter on how people can mitigate the damaging effects of earthquakes and volcanoes through individual and collective action. A blend of human interest and authoritative science, The Earth in Turmoil is a view into the most powerful forces nature can unleash.
Comments: (5)
Dorizius
One of the authors is an active and well known researcher in the field and clearly knows both his subject matter and how to explain it. Or else the synergy between the two authors has led to this result. In either case, if you've any interest in the subject matter, earthquakes and volcanoes, this is the popular book to read. It's very well written, has good diagrams, a glossary for those not familiar with the terms and a nice set of references, all of which are important to someone outside the field.
Depending on how much geology changes over the next decade or so, this book may turn out to be a classic book on this aspect of geology for the nongeologic community.
I have two very small quibbles.
First, geologists seem to want to "claim" credit for the amount of damage their specialty causes. In this case, water gets shorted as a source of catastrophy. I believe floods may have taken more lives than earthquakes and volcanoes.
Second, having been trained as a mathematician, I find it disconcerting how often three roughly evenly spaced events are taken as evidence of regularity. Of course, geologic data's very expensive to obtain, but the uncertainty could perhaps be made a little more apparent.
Actually, I've a third quibble, though it may be considered a plus by many. The book uses earthquakes and volcanoes in the US as its source material. The best examples may not always be taken from the 50 States, but an American audience is likely to find it more interesting.
Lastly, Fradkin, in "Magnitude 8", doesn't seem to think scientists know how to communicate. This book is a counterexample in eactly the same area he's writing about. While I have serious reservations about "Magnitude 8" because of what I consider to be Fradkin's lack of understanding of what science is and how it gets done (to be fair, he does note that he had serious disagreements with scientists while writing the book), his book is also well worth reading if you live in California and occasionally worry about earthquakes. Since "Magnitude 8" includes policy and preparation, it's more of a companion piece than a competitor.
Mushicage
This is a book about geological hazards in the United States. The general focus is on the West Coast, if only because that is the most tectoncally active area. Some color plates, and a few black and white photos, are included, but the primary emphasis is on a well-written text. The book is highly readable and keeps one's attention throughout.
The authors begin their examination with a review of the Northwest, discussing both volcanic hazards and the lesser known, recently discovered, but far more dangerous hazard of a truly giant earthquake in that region. Every citizen of that part of the United States should carefully peruse this section.
Attention then turns to California and the San Andreas Fault. Author Sieh is a renowned expert on this transform fault, and thoroughly discusses the extensive research he and others have done on this peril. Again, as with the Northwest, this section is very highly recommended.
The earthquake hazards of the Great Basin and the volcanic hazards of Yellowstone are examined in detail, as are mid-continent earthquake problems in the central Mississippi valley. The book also looks at potential East Coast earthquake and tsunami hazards.
The authors use particular care in explaining geologic termnology in an understandable manner, and this is rare and impressive. Many books of this genre are deficient in that they either oversimplify the material at hand, leading to inaccuracies and potentially dangerous distortions, or by making geology appear so difficult that the reader with a non-scientific background becomes frustrated. The authors have carefully avoided either pitfall, and the book has profited though such care.
If you live in the United States, you should own and read this book. It may save your investments. or your life.
Sorryyy
One of the things that makes this book stand out is that its geology is up-to-date and detailed. I was a geology major back in the late 70s and while I decided not to go on in the field, I've kept up reasonably well. I learned a great deal of new info from this book, including the only coherent explanation I've ever read of the "hot spots" responsible for volcanoes like those in Hawaii.
The basic format of the book is of a west-to-east journey through the U.S., although Southern California (where co-author Sieh lives and works) gets by far the most detailed coverage. We get some vivid anecdotal accounts of earthquakes and eruptions, but the overall focus is more "what we think we know and why we think we know it." As another reviewer said, you must be interested enough in the subject to follow some reasonably complex logical arguments.
The color photos in the book are a valuable addition -- among other things, they made me realize that the oddly ramp-like block just south of Sunset Boulevard in LA is actually the scarp of the fault that has raised the Hollywood Hills.
The writing style is clear and approachable. All in all a very enjoyable read for folks with a serious interest in Earth Science.
Beanisend
This is an excellent and easy-to-read summary of the exciting new research and thinking about earthquakes and volcanos. In particular, the chapters on the San Andreas and New Madrid fault systems were excellent. A great read.
Unde
This book was very well written. It is a wonder to those whose know nothing about geology and those who have a passion for it. Even though those who know nothing about geology, those who know about it would enjoy this book much more.