carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » The Ecology of River Systems (Monographiae Biologicae)

eBook The Ecology of River Systems (Monographiae Biologicae) download

by Bryan R. Davies,Keith F. Walker

eBook The Ecology of River Systems (Monographiae Biologicae) download ISBN: 9061935407
Author: Bryan R. Davies,Keith F. Walker
Publisher: Springer; 1 edition (July 31, 1986)
Language: English
Pages: 793
ePub: 1401 kb
Fb2: 1284 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi azw txt doc
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee.

Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.

Progress: 9. 9% restored. Главная The Ecology of River Systems . The Ecology of River Systems. B. R. Davies, K. F. Walker (auth. Dr. Bryan R. Davies, Dr. Keith F. Walker (ed. Our understanding of the ecology of running waters has come a long way during the past few years.

River systems as ecological units. The Murray-Darling River system. Monographiae Biologicae. An introduction to the ecology of river systems.

Bryan R. Davies Keith F. Walker9 de marzo de 2013 . Springer Science & Business Media. Davies, Keith F. Walker.

Start by marking The Ecology of River Systems as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Ecology of River Systems as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Our understanding of the ecology of running waters has come a long way during the past few years.

The five profiles chosen for this study are from a sequence of river terraces along the Lower Macleay River in northern .

Advances in the study of River Murray ecology and the legacy of Keith Forbes Walker (1946−2016). The five profiles chosen for this study are from a sequence of river terraces along the Lower Macleay River in northern . The stratigraphy and a set of radiocarbon dates (Walker 1969) indicate that the terraces are a time sequence in which the deposits and surfaces are progressively older as they occur higher above the present river level. Springer Netherlands, 3. 7.

The mighty Zambezi, fourth largest river system in Africa, is the lifeline of southern Africa. From its headwaters in northwestern Zambia to its outlet 2,574 km downstream into the Indian Ocean, the Zambezi drains an area of 1,570,000 km2 from eight countries and carries a mean annual flow of 2,400 m3s-1 across the arid central African plateau (Balek 1977, Davies 1986).

Our understanding of the ecology of running waters has come a long way during the past few years. From being a largely descriptive subject, with a few under­ tones concerned with such things as fisheries, pollution or control of blackflies, it has evolved into a discipline with hypotheses, such as the River Continuum Concept (Vannote et a/. 1980), and even a book suggesting that it offers opportunity for the testing of ecological theory (Barnes & Minshall 1983). However, perusal of the literature reveals that, although some of the very early studies were concerned with large rivers (references in Hynes 1970), the great mass of the work that has been done on running water has been on streams and small rivers, and information on larger rivers is either on such limited topics as fisheries or plankton, scattered among the journals, or not available to the general limnologist. The only exceptions are a few books in this series of publications, such as those on the Nile (Rz6ska 1976), the Volga (Morduckai­ Boltovskoi 1979) and the Amazon {Sioli 1984), and the recent compendium by Whitton (1984) on European rivers, among which there are a few that rate as large.