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eBook What the Bones Tell Us download

by Jeffrey H. Schwartz

eBook What the Bones Tell Us download ISBN: 0816518556
Author: Jeffrey H. Schwartz
Publisher: University of Arizona Press (December 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 292
ePub: 1756 kb
Fb2: 1658 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lit lrf txt doc
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Jeffrey Hugh Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is an American physical anthropologist and professor of biological anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh in. .What the Bones Tell Us. New York: Henry Holt.

Jeffrey Hugh Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is an American physical anthropologist and professor of biological anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and a fellow and President of the World Academy of Art and Science (WAAS) from 2008-2012.

Start by marking What the Bones Tell Us as Want to Read .

Start by marking What the Bones Tell Us as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I'd have rated it a four if it weren't for the strange digressions that took us away from the tpic from time to time.

Jeffrey Schwartz is the author of What the Bones Tell Us. Jeffrey H. Schwartz. About }. { Macmillan Home Page }.

Schwartz ranges from digs in the Negev Desert through Africa and Europe to the local coroner's office to explain how interpretations of the past are made.

Schwartz ranges from digs in the Negev Desert through Africa and Europe to the local coroner's office to explain how interpretations of the past are made.

Bone fragments can be used not only to identify animal species but also to tell us of their past history.

What counts is the data and the context in which the evidence is analyzed. Bone fragments can be used not only to identify animal species but also to tell us of their past history. Studies of bones can also reveal the land's past capacity to sustain animal life, whether domestic or wild.

Schwartz (Anthropology/Univ. The main reason is Schwartz's impressive professional versatility

Schwartz (Anthropology/Univ. of Pittsburgh) gives us the bare bones and more about the science of osteological analysis. There's a vast multitude of bone chips here-of murder victims, Neandertals, Australopithecus africanus-but they don't quite hang together into a coherent skeleton. The main reason is Schwartz's impressive professional versatility. It seems that one day he's expounding on the laws of taphonomy (the history of bones after death), the next he's off in the woods exhuming corpses or sifting dirt at an archaeological dig halfway around the world.

com's Jeffrey H. Schwartz Page and shop for all Jeffrey H. Schwartz books. What the Bones Tell Us: An Anthropologist Examines the Evidence in an Attempt to Unravel Ancient Mysteries and Modern Crimes. by Jeffrey H. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Jeffrey H.

Schwartz gives us the bare bones and more about the science of osteological analysis.

What the Bones Tell U. Schwartz made an appearance in the documentary film The Trouble with Atheism.

What the Bones Tell Us.

A physical anthropologist exposes the inner workings of archaeology and anthropology, illustrating what can be learned from fossils and fragments of ancient cultures and civilizations. Schwartz ranges from digs in the Negev Desert through Africa and Europe to the local coroner's office to explain how interpretations of the past are made.
Comments: (2)
Skrimpak
This textbook was so expensive in the school bookstore but was a great price and shipped to my home earlier than accepted! The book was a bit boring but helped me in my course.
Vonalij
In this book the author tells us about his work as an osteologist, which involves crime-scene investigation -- but that's not the most interesting part. The really valuable stuff comes afterwards, in my opinion, and it forms the bulk of the book: the question of who or what is human or humanlike, and more importantly, how we can begin to assess or establish their relationship to one another. Prof. Schwartz discusses many questions in intelligent detail that I have long wondered about: if what we 'know' about any given species is dependent on bone fragments of usually one individual, possibly two or three (but are we sure?), and the dating in any case is subject to serious revision, how are the beings that are talked about so authoritatively real outside of the labels we give them? (A delightful send-up of this situation was written all the way back in 1931 by the American humourist Will Cuppy, in his book How To Tell Your Friends From The Apes.) Mind you, I do wonder whether Schwartz is actually open to the idea (put out by Desmond Morris, who is not highly thought of these days if I'm not mistaken) that human breasts 'mimic' human buttocks. In the first place, they obviously do not do that, and in the second, there are much better explanations for why human females have permanent rather than temporary lactating breasts. Anyway, this is worth a read if you have any serious interest in human origins.