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eBook Prolog: A Logical Approach download

by Tony Dodd

eBook Prolog: A Logical Approach download ISBN: 0198538219
Author: Tony Dodd
Publisher: Oxford University Press (November 29, 1990)
Language: English
Pages: 568
ePub: 1491 kb
Fb2: 1206 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf azw doc docx
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

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Prolog: A Logical Approach. The second part of the book presents some of the most common features, including facilities that are common to all Prologs. The third part of the volume is concerned with programming style.

oceedings{Dodd1990PrologA, title {Prolog - a logical approach}, author {Tony Dodd}, year {1990} .

oceedings{Dodd1990PrologA, title {Prolog - a logical approach}, author {Tony Dodd}, year {1990} }. Tony Dodd. From the Publisher: The goal of logic programming is to provide a higher level formalism, in which the solution is represented using a formal representation that was in use before computers were invented: logic. Enhancements to Prolo. ONTINUE READING.

PROLOG : A Logical Approach. The goal of logic programming is to provide a higher level formalism, in which the solution is represented using a formal representation that was in use before computers were invented: logic

PROLOG : A Logical Approach. By (author) Tony Dodd. The goal of logic programming is to provide a higher level formalism, in which the solution is represented using a formal representation that was in use before computers were invented: logic.

Bell Polynomials Approach Applied to (2 + 1)-Dimensional Kotera-Sawada Equation Cheng, Wen-guang, Li, Biao, and Chen, Yong, Abstract and Applied Analysis, 2014.

Bell Polynomials Approach Applied to (2 + 1)-Dimensional Kotera-Sawada Equation Cheng, Wen-guang, Li, Biao, and Chen, Yong, Abstract and Applied Analysis, 2014.

The goal of logic programming is to provide a higher level formalism, in which the solution is represented using a formal representation that was in use before computers were invented: logic.

Journal of Symbolic Logic 58 (2):719-719 (1993). Similar books and articles. This article has no associated abstract. Added to PP index 2013-11-03. Total views 12 ( of 2,250,168 ). Recent downloads (6 months) 7 ( of 2,250,168 ). How can I increase my downloads? Downloads.

A Logical Approach Oxford University Press, 1990. Advanced Programming Techniques The MIT Press, second e. 1994 Wielemaker, 2001 Wielemaker, Jan SWI-Prolog .

Oxford University Press, Oxford, New York, and Tokyo, 1990, xii + 556 pp. B. Wüthrich. Oxford University Press, Oxford, New York, and Tokyo, 1990, xii + 556 pp.

Procedural programming languages, such as FORTRAN, Pascal, and C, expect the programmer to build a representation of the solution to a problem using a model of the execution process of a computer. The goal of logic programming is to provide a higher level formalism, in which the solution is represented using a formal representation that was in use before computers were invented: human reasoning. The present volume starts with an explanation of how logic may be used as a programming language, and then explains the practical limitations that at present restrict logic programmers to the use of the subset of logic embodied in the Prolog programming language. Enhancements to Prolog that compensate for the weakness of its underlying logic, but compromise the purity of the language are then introduced. Most Prolog systems add to the logical core of the language a bewildering variety of extra features for procedural tasks such as input/output. The second part of the book presents some of the most common features, including facilities that are common to all Prologs. There is also an account of more abstruse topics such as garbage collection. The third part of the volume is concerned with programming style. Its principal aim is to show that despite the illogicalities in Prolog, a number of design criteria are available that conform to the principles of logic programming. Efficiency of programs is also considered at length. An approach to debugging Prolog programs is discussed and there is an extended example showing how an application is developed.