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by David S. Wilcove

eBook The Condor's Shadow: The Loss and Recovery of Wildlife in America download ISBN: 0385498810
Author: David S. Wilcove
Publisher: Anchor; Reprint edition (May 9, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 366
ePub: 1969 kb
Fb2: 1679 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: txt lrf doc rtf
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. The author examines the complex state of wildlife in America today as "hundreds of species have vanished completely," but yet, "in some areas there are more acres of forests now than at the turn of the century, and many of our lakes and rivers are cleaner today than they were twenty years ag. -Jacket.

g narrative power, The Condor's Shadow traces the ways in which human greed and ignorance have wreaked havoc on our ecological landscape. The heir apparent to Peter Matthiessen's 1959 classic Wildlife in America, The Condor's Shadow is a brilliant and compulsively readable study of the state of North American wildlife and what is being done to reverse the damage humans have caused.

The Condor's Shadow book.

the loss and recovery of wildlife in America

the loss and recovery of wildlife in America. by David Samuel Wilcove. Published 1999 by . Freeman and Co. in New York. Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-317) and index.

David S. Wilcove is Senior Ecologist at the Environmental Defense Fund and one of the nation's foremost experts on endangered species

With gripping narrative power, The Condor's Shadow traces the ways in which human greed and ignorance have wreaked havoc on our ecological landscape. David S. Wilcove is Senior Ecologist at the Environmental Defense Fund and one of the nation's foremost experts on endangered species. Among other publications, he has written for Audubon and Nature Conservancy. He lives in Arlington, Virginia.

With gripping narrative power, The Condor's Shadow traces the ways in which human greed and ignorance have wreaked havoc on our ecological landscape. David Wilcove takes the reader on a tour of biodiversity loss and renewal throughout the United States.

The Loss and Recovery of Wildlife in America. The heir apparent to Peter Matthiessen’s 1959 classic Wildlife in America, The Condor’s Shadow is a brilliant and compulsively readable study of the state of North American wildlife and what is being done to reverse the damage humans have caused.

David S Wilcove, Edward O Wilson. With gripping narrative power, The Condor's Shadow traces the ways in which human greed and ignorance have wreaked havoc on our ecological landscape.

The Condor's Shadow attempts to make sense of these complex, and often contradictory, patterns of change. Exploring the cycles of loss and recovery that have characterized many North American ecosystems over the past two centuries and especially during the last fifty years, The Condor's Shadow examines the factors that determine a species' vulnerability to extinction and reveals the unanticipated, even improbable, consequences of removing even a small part of any ecosystem.

New Biological Books. The Condor's Shadow: The Loss and Recovery of Wildlife in America.

With gripping narrative power, The Condor's Shadow traces the ways in which human greed and ignorance have wreaked havoc on our ecological landscape.The heir apparent to Peter Matthiessen's 1959 classic Wildlife in America, The Condor's Shadow is a brilliant and compulsively readable study of the state of North American wildlife and what is being done to reverse the damage humans have caused.  With equal respect for the smallest feather-mite and the fiercest grizzly, the frailest flower and the stateliest redwood, David S. Wilcove illustrates--in jargon-free, often witty prose--nature's delicate system of checks and balances, examining the factors that determine a species' vulnerability and the consequences of losing even the tiniest part of any ecosystem. An examination of both the heart-wrenching failures and stunning successes of our conservation efforts, The Condor's Shadow chronicles the destruction and resilience of our American wilderness and offers an insightful, eloquent overview that will appeal to avid conservationists and recreational nature-lovers alike.
Comments: (7)
Angana
Excellent book.
Keramar
I liked some parts of the book, but it helped he to decide to change my major. It is nothing but gloom and doom. Even when it talks about modern successes it still goes STRAIGHT back to having no hope. The book is interesting, but I didn't like it.
Leniga
In this novel, David Wilcove discusss the relationship of the development of america and wildlife. Each chapter is broken down into sections chronicaling each section of america. From the great plains of the midwest to the hawaiian islands, overdevelopment, overhunting and neglagence all have contributed to the loss of wildlife in america. The fauna of america were so mal protected for so long, ecologists of the last century have pushed for legisation to protect or furry friends. This book is a great read of any aspiring ecologist, The only issue i had with the book is that it put no importance on the value of Technological advances, such as roads, buildings, and pesticides. Overall this is a book that i would recomend to anyone who wanted to know more about the ecological movement in America- GHHS APES
NiceOne
After reading this thought provoking book, I was left with a sense of anger and hostility towards our ancestors that destroyed the earth as well as the money-hungry that currently destroy the habitat for their own desires. Mr. Wilcove does a tremendous job of detailing the history of natural resource abuse in specific areas of the United States and steps being taken to attempt to repair the damage (irreversible?) of mankind in the past 250 years.
His descriptive literary skills allowed me to picture the incredible natural habitats of our country prior to damage created from the over-consuming American public. One wishes he could travel back in time to witness these spectacular scenes and take steps to prevent their demise.
Landarn
The book is about the loss and recovery of wildlife. It talks about how many species have vanished because of human settlement and all the negative effects we have brought. It has an indepth analysis of several ares of the country such as Yellowstone National Park, oceans, rivers, lakes, beaches, and grasslands. The good thing about this book is that it informs and provides ways in which we are able to help recover wildlife. This book is very detailed. The author uses several examples for each area he explains. It is a very informative book, but it is not a book for the average reader.
Kabandis
Wilcove's knack for the well-turned phrase and the personal anecdote makes reading this natural history of wildlife in America compelling. The Condor's Shadow takes decades of scientific observations and current theories, and converts them into gripping tales of survival, extinction, and recovery. This book is a masterful summary of conservation biology's lessons for us - lessons we had better soon grasp or condemn future generations to a simplified, homogenous environment. It communicates the lessons in stories accessible to a general audience with neither patronizing tones nor gross generalizations. For readers with a background in the field, the footnotes and detailed portraits of America's ecosystems make this a peerless reference source. I have begun recommending this book as indispensable background to my students who are about to study environmental and natural resources policy. Also, readers planning to travel to this summer might want to focus especially on a chapter discussing the region they are visiting. I think they will find that Wilcove's insights on the natural history of an area they are visiting will enormously enhance their experience.
Kinashand
Wilcove's book is beautifully written in easy yet sophisticated words which paint a picture at environmental disasters and the measures which are being taken to remedy them. It's rich history of the American landscape makes it an interesting read. The knowledge one attains after reading this book makes you want to know more and continue your effort to fit complacently in the web of life.
This is a good book for anyone interested in the aspects of environmental science related more to the preservation of animals. It presented facts with an informative and optimistic tone, focusing on what can be done to help endangered species as opposed to what wasn't done. It is very easy to read, the style making it accessible those who aren't scholars.