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eBook Shark Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance download

by Thomas B. Allen

eBook Shark Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance download ISBN: 1585741744
Author: Thomas B. Allen
Publisher: The Lyons Press; 1st edition (April 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 312
ePub: 1886 kb
Fb2: 1739 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: txt lit mbr mobi
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

This book is an EXCELLENT book on shark attacks. While it's mentioned in various spots before then, the last 15 pages finally truly discuss "their causes and avoidance. This book is not without merit

This book is an EXCELLENT book on shark attacks. Thomas B. Allen was a co-author of another book I had read about sharks ("Shadows in the Sea"), so I knew it was going to be a good one. I recommend this book highly to anyone who enjoys books on sharks and shark attacks. This book is not without merit.

Start by marking Shark Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The shark is so well adapted to its element that its existence on the. Start by marking Shark Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

The Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916 were a series of shark attacks along the coast of New Jersey, in the United States, between July 1 and 12, 1916, in which four people were killed and one injured

The Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916 were a series of shark attacks along the coast of New Jersey, in the United States, between July 1 and 12, 1916, in which four people were killed and one injured. The incidents occurred during a deadly summer heat wave and polio epidemic in the United States that drove thousands of people to the seaside resorts of the Jersey Shore.

Allen, Thomas B. Publication date.

Shark Attacks contains the harrowing personal stories of shark attack survivors expert opinions from marine biologists and the latest scientific studies of shark behavior An unflinching look at a terrifying phenomenon. if you would like to know why shark bites people this book will make you understanding shark in away you know shark are intersseting aimmalsthank you shkedi productions. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 18 years ago. This is truly a good book for anyone interested about sharks and why they attack. The book gives an almost comprehensive view of attacks from around the world.

Here is an unflinching look at the terrifying phenomenon of shark attacks from the author of The Shark Almanac. The shark is so well adapted to its element that its existence on the planet actually predates trees

Here is an unflinching look at the terrifying phenomenon of shark attacks from the author of The Shark Almanac. The shark is so well adapted to its element that its existence on the planet actually predates trees. When people enter that element in increasing numbers, as they have in recent years, the results can be tragic and seemingly arbitrary. The result is the most thorough and informative book to date on the phenomenon. (2001). Shark Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance. A fatal attack by the shark, Carcharhinus Galapagensis, at St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. Lyons Press, 293 pp. Ambrose, Greg (1996). Berkley Medallion Books, USA, 263 pp. Baldridge, H. David. Shark aggression against Man: A Position Paper, presented at the 2nd Annual Meeting of the American Elasmobranch Society, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, June 1986.

Shark Attacks : Their Causes and Avoidance by Thomas B. Allen.

For the film, see Shark Attack (film). Shark attacks-Their causes and avoidances by Thomas B. Rice, Xan (2011-07-19). Shark attack Classification and external resources A sign warning about the presence of sharks off Salt Rock, South Africa.

Find signed collectible books: 'Shark Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance'. Coauthors & Alternates. Tories: Fighting for the King in America's First Civil War. by Mr. Thomas B Allen. ISBN 9780061241819 (978-0-06-124181-9) Softcover, Harper Paperbacks, 2011.

Allen (an author, no university affiliation) separates the facts about sharks from the horror-movie lore. He explains how sharks select victims and outlines factors contributing to or mitigating the severity of an attack. Survivors discuss their experiences, and marine biologists present the available data. Chapters describe attacks in California, Hawaii, South Africa, Australia, in rivers, in lakes, at sea, and on the shore. They also discuss prevention, and survival. Appendixes list popular and scientific species names and instructions for reporting an attack. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Comments: (5)
Fani
This book is an EXCELLENT book on shark attacks. Thomas B. Allen was a co-author of another book I had read about sharks ("Shadows in the Sea"), so I knew it was going to be a good one. I recommend this book highly to anyone who enjoys books on sharks and shark attacks. Very informative.
Tisicai
We must truly have become a society of victims. Now even the shark, once the "eating machine" and "primordial predator," has been bestowed victimhood in Thomas Allen's "Shark Attacks."

The New Shark, as Allen calls it, is being finned, hooked, poisoned and otherwise exterminated by humans, the new top predator.

There is some truth in this. Only the United States, Australia and New Zealand manage shark fisheries. Everywhere else, sharks are free for all.

But it does not follow, as Allen thinks it does, that worrying about shark attacks is "irrational."

In fact, after introducing the New Shark, Allen then relates incident after incident of sharks behaving like Old Sharks, chomping down on what comes their way.

Among humans, these are overwhelmingly surfers. According to various surveys, surfers are the targets in something like three out of five shark attacks.

This is because surfers and sharks are attracted to the same areas of the ocean, though for different reasons. Or at least, good surf means a roiled bottom, and sharks apparently make many attacks on humans because -- despite having more kinds of sense organs than we have -- they depend a lot on eyesight.

But, says Allen, while surfers make up the most total victims, the most dangerous part of the ocean, from a shark-human perspective, is where seals and sea lions swim.

Records are none too good, even today, though they are getting better, but Allen presents graphs showing that numbers of shark attacks off U.S. coastlines correlate pretty closely with population growth.

Sharks are not very dangerous. Bees kill several times more humans than sharks, and in every U.S. state that has both sharks and alligators, there are more alligator attacks. But a book called "Bee Attacks" is not likely to sell as well as a book called "Shark Attacks."

As a curiosity, Hawaii is the only state that has more deaths from sharks than from lightning. Not because Hawaii has so many fatal shark attacks, but because the islands have so few thunderstorms.

Allen's book is a hodgepodge, repetitive and poorly organized. But it does contain a lot of information, much of it new and some of it incorrect. Still, researchers do know more than they did only a few years ago about what sharks attack, when and where, and some of that is available here, if read carefully.

But the book in unreliable in many details. For example, Allen writes that, "In Hawaii, tourists who don't know the waters are frequently the victims." Not true.

It is also not true that in Hawaii "official" data on shark attacks "is highly influenced by the conflicting interests of tourist, diver, fisherman, environmental and shark-welfare constituencies." That is because there are no "official" data. He just made that up.

There is an unofficial shark attack log, maintained by a turtle researcher, because sharks attack turtles. It shows that until recently, there were NO shark attacks on tourists. It is impossible to be sure, but this apparently was because tourists stuck close to shore and most Hawaii shark attacks were out a ways. In the last 15 years or so, tourists have been attacked by sharks, probably because they are venturing farther from shore than they used to.
Jediathain
The title of this book is accurate; it's subtitle is not. Literally 80% of the pages in this book are near-clinical descriptions of shark attack cases around the world, separated into chapters by geography. While it's mentioned in various spots before then, the last 15 pages finally truly discuss "their causes and avoidance."

This book is not without merit. First, the descriptions and circumstances of each of the attacks avoid hype and hysteria and might be entertaining if you happen to be the type that likes to watch the scene of a car wreck. Second, it theorizes that the 'test bite' hypothesis may be incorrect, as great whites and other sharks return for second (and sometimes more) bites.

If you'd like to hear about various regional shark attack histories and stories about people getting getting their limbs torn off, it's all here. On the other hand, if are looking for an in-depth scientific discussion on shark biology, attack behavior, and attack prevention beyond what you can find already published on most websites, there are better books out there.
Doulkree
if you would like to know why shark bites people this book will make you understanding shark in away you know shark are intersseting aimmals
thank you shkedi productions
Fecage
This is truly a good book for anyone interested about sharks and why they attack. The book gives an almost comprehensive view of attacks from around the world. It even gives a synopsis on the sharks that seem to attack people the most. I would recomend this for anyone who is just curious about sharks, or anyone who is interested in attacks by sharks specifically.