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eBook Monster of God: The Man-Eating Predator in the Jungles of History and the Mind download

by David Quammen

eBook Monster of God: The Man-Eating Predator in the Jungles of History and the Mind download ISBN: 0393326098
Author: David Quammen
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Revised ed. edition (September 17, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 528
ePub: 1206 kb
Fb2: 1744 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: docx azw mbr lit
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Monster of God: The Man-E. has been added to your Cart. Quammen writes about the survivor, not humanity, but rather the man-eating predators. The true monster's of God are humanity and their destructive nature when in comes to the world around them. Great read nonetheless.

Monster of God: The Man-E. Depressing, but fascinating as well.

Another though-provoking idea that Quammen examines is the claim by Grahame Webb that conservation of alpha predators can only be accomplished by promoting teir economic viability. His example is the salt water crocodile. By allowing a certain quantity to be killed for their valuable leather, conservationists can motivate government protection.

For millennia, lions, tigers, and their man-eating kin have kept our dark, scary . One of my complaints with the book is that the selection of predators was somewhat arbitrary.

For millennia, lions, tigers, and their man-eating kin have kept our dark, scary forests dark and scary, and their predatory majesty has been the stuff of folklore. Quammen's Ability to Turn Science Into High Drama Is Unmatched. Sets a New Standard in Nature Writing. Insatiably curious, level-headed and amazingly erudite.

David Quammen (born February 1948) is an American science, nature and travel writer and the author of. .Monster of God : the man-eating predator in the jungles of history and the mind (2003), New York: W. W. Norton.

David Quammen (born February 1948) is an American science, nature and travel writer and the author of fifteen books. He wrote a column called "Natural Acts" for Outside magazine for fifteen years. The Reluctant Mr. Darwin: An Intimate Portrait of Charles Darwin and the Making of His Theory of Evolution (Great Discoveries); W. Norton, 2006. ISBN 978-0-393-32995-7.

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Stephen Moss enjoys David Quammen's study of predators with a taste for human flesh, Monster of Go. Stephen Moss is a producer at the BBC Natural History Unit. His book on the social history of birdwatching, A Bird in the Bush, will be published in June by Aurum.

David Quammen is the author of The Song of the Dodo, among other books. He has been honored with the John Burroughs Medal for nature writing, an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, an award in the art of the essay from PEN, and (three times) the National Magazine Award. Quammen is also a contributing writer for National Geographic. He lives in Bozeman, Montana.

Monsters of God lacks even photographs of the four predator species .

Monsters of God lacks even photographs of the four predator species explored. The maps provided helped me locate the remote areas they inhabit, but also made me nostalgic for fictional animal fantasies like Richard Adams's Watership Down (1972) since, when supplemented by the magic of imagination, Adams is able to bring his subjects to life, allowing his reader to imagine them in the territories shown in the maps he provides. Not that I underestimate the dangers such large predators, in fact wilderness itself, face.

David Quammen is the author of The Song of the Dodo, among other books

David Quammen is the author of The Song of the Dodo, among other books.

"Rich detail and vivid anecdotes of adventure....A treasure trove of exotic fact and hard thinking."―The New York Times Book Review, front page

For millennia, lions, tigers, and their man-eating kin have kept our dark, scary forests dark and scary, and their predatory majesty has been the stuff of folklore. But by the year 2150 big predators may only exist on the other side of glass barriers and chain-link fences. Their gradual disappearance is changing the very nature of our existence. We no longer occupy an intermediate position on the food chain; instead we survey it invulnerably from above―so far above that we are in danger of forgetting that we even belong to an ecosystem. Casting his expert eye over the rapidly diminishing areas of wilderness where predators still reign, the award-winning author of The Song of the Dodo examines the fate of lions in India's Gir forest, of saltwater crocodiles in northern Australia, of brown bears in the mountains of Romania, and of Siberian tigers in the Russian Far East. In the poignant and troublesome ferocity of these embattled creatures, we recognize something primeval deep within us, something in danger of vanishing forever.
Comments: (7)
Coiriel
While Quammen himself has remarked on the natural world's "great capacity for vulgar entertainment," he is reluctant to travel far down that path in Monster of God. Indeed, if you came looking for gory details of terrifying animal attacks, you'd better be prepared to find them hidden amidst long stretches of historical and political information. You will learn far more about nomad buffalo herders in India, the plight of the aborigines in Australia, and the hunting trips of Nicolae Ceaucescu in Romania, than you will about any particular predator species. Quammen is careful to provide context--possibly too much context. He has a point to make about social class and resource management, a theory he gives the unlikely name of "the Muskrat Conundrum," and he feels there's a lot of historical and economic ground to cover, before we can understand what man-eaters have to do with the social class of the people they eat.

His goal is for us to sympathize both with the predators, teetering on the edge of extinction, and the people whose lives dictate that they live among and fear these predators. A former novelist and literature scholar, Quammen presents the human side of the story with astute characterizations of varied personalities. His approach is the intimacy of immersion journalism. Though disguised as a sensationalist page-turner about animals that kill people, Monster is, at its heart, a conservationist's tale.

A problem that generally plagues the literature of conservation is the unrelenting dreariness and pessimism that can galvanize the thick-skinned reader but leaves all others inert and despondent. In contrast, David Quammen's dire predictions, put into a rich context of history, society, environment and gripping dramatic prose, place Monster of God into another category: not quite a guilty pleasure animal attack book, and not the bitter pill medicine of standard environmental writing. Instead he's presented a combination of both forms, a scholarly yet entertaining monster book with a conservationist's conscience.
Anen
I'm still in the process of reading this work, but early on it offers great insight into some of the problems between mankind and some of the other top predators on the planet!
Ionzar
This book is amazing. As in it's predecessor, The Song of the Dodo, David Quammen acheives an amazing feat by combining science, travel stories, literature, history, and philosophy (and a sprinkling of pop culture) into a compelling discussion of the fate of what he calls "alpha predators" in this modern world. Quammen traveled to India to visit people living among lions (yes, lions), Australia to visit people living among crocodiles, Romania to visit people living with brown bears (who knew?), and the Russian Far East to visit people living with tigers. Each of these pieces is a distinct story by itself, with its own set of characters, yet Quammen sews them all together with common concerns about predators, prey, and who pays the price of having these alpha predators around. Sensitive to traditional cultures as he is to natural ecosystems, Quammen is a great writer producing unique literature that is important for our time.
Samulkis
Quammen writes about the survivor, not humanity, but rather the man-eating predators. The true monster's of God are humanity and their destructive nature when in comes to the world around them. Great read nonetheless. Depressing, but fascinating as well. Survival has never seemed to majestic.
LØV€ YØỮ
Well done.
blac wolf
My first Quammen book and now I'm hungry for more. He digs deep into history, myth, folklore, and gets into his own field work to produce this masterwork.
Beranyle
David Quammen is an exceptionally good writer; however, this book is very slow in places and boring to read. Much of the book reads like a research paper which in a way it is. This book is for those highly interested in the subject and is quite heavy duty reading. I still recommonded the book, though, because it presents an important and educational message,
good