carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Washed Up: The Curious Journeys of Flotsam and Jetsam

eBook Washed Up: The Curious Journeys of Flotsam and Jetsam download

by Skye Moody

eBook Washed Up: The Curious Journeys of Flotsam and Jetsam download ISBN: 1570614636
Author: Skye Moody
Publisher: Sasquatch Books; First Edition edition (August 1, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1672 kb
Fb2: 1546 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: azw rtf lit txt
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Washed Up: The Curious Journeys of Flotsam and Jetsam as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The book collects together stories from across the globe and over the centuries, in styles reminiscent of People . Washed Up" is a beautifully written collage about the tangled, tide-driven world of flotsam and jetsam. Published on September 22, 2006.

The book collects together stories from across the globe and over the centuries, in styles reminiscent of People Magazine (with photographs), Tattler and National Geographic. Moody has a journalist's eye for detail, and a storyteller's ability to inject dry facts with human interest.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Author Skye Moody walks the coast, dons her wet suit, and heads out to sea to understand the excellent debris that accrues along the tideline. There she finds advanced military technology applied to locating buried Rolexes, hardcore competitive beachcombing conventions, and isolated beach communities whose residents are like flotsam congregated at the slightest obstacle on the coastline. This book confirms that the world is a mysterious place and that treasure is out there to be found. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Author Skye Moody walks the coast, dons her wet suit, and heads out to sea to understand the excellent debris that accrues . Washed Up" is a beautifully written collage about the tangled, tide-driven world of flotsam and jetsam

Author Skye Moody walks the coast, dons her wet suit, and heads out to sea to understand the excellent debris that accrues along th. .

The ocean gives up many prizes, just setting them on our beaches for us to find.

Publisher: Mjf Books, 2006. Pubished by MJF books

Publisher: Mjf Books, 2006. Pubished by MJF books. Photographs by Skye Moody.

All sorts of flotsam and jetsam washed up on the beach. 2. Fig. worthless matter; worthless encumbrances. His mind is burdened with the flotsam and jetsam of many years of poor instruction and lax study habits.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Washed up : the curious journeys of flotsam & jetsam Skye Moody. Book's title: Washed up : the curious journeys of flotsam & jetsam Skye Moody. Library of Congress Control Number: 2006044661. International Standard Book Number (ISBN)

The sea gives up its secrets in the form of flotsam and jetsam: Left-foot Nikes from Asia pepper the Oregon .

The sea gives up its secrets in the form of flotsam and jetsam: Left-foot Nikes from Asia pepper the Oregon Coast. Missives in bottles were the instant messaging of their day (and once preferred by the British Naval Intelligence). Seedpods from one continent germinate a forest on another. Hardened whale spittle amplifies the human sex drive but its possession is banned by the EPA. Author Skye Moody walks the tide line and jumps the surf to discover the stories behind what has washed u. -BOOK JACKET.

The ocean gives up many prizes, just setting them on our beaches for us to find. From rubber ducks that started out somewhere in Indonesia to land Venice Beach, to an intact refrigerator makes it way to the Jersey Shore. Chunks of beeswax found on the Oregon coast are the packing remnants of 18th century Spanish gold. Author Skye Moody walks the coast, dons her wet suit, and heads out to sea to understand the excellent debris that accrues along the tideline. There she finds advanced military technology applied to locating buried Rolexes, hardcore competitive beachcombing conventions, and isolated beach communities whose residents are like flotsam congregated at the slightest obstacle on the coastline. This book confirms that the world is a mysterious place and that treasure is out there to be found.
Comments: (7)
Madis
I feel compelled to write this review for those of you who, like me, thought this would be a sort of beachcomber's approach to oceanography. It isn't, or at least not primarily. The idea of patterns of ocean currents predictably guiding flotsam to certain shores, or into perpetual circulation in huge stagnant seas of trash is of obvious interest to environmentalists or even those with just a casual curiosity about the origins of unexpected objects encountered on the seashore. I was originally attracted to these ideas by Ebbesmeyer's Flotsametrics, but was steered to Washed Up by its higher reviewer ratings. These subjects are indeed covered in the fourth chapter. Like all the others, it is well written, testimony to the author's writing experience, mostly in fiction. But this is a personal narrative, rather than a journalistic exploration. The tale begins and ends with an exotic piece of flotsam the author found and discarded from the shores of Washington. In between is a meandering collection of interesting facts and experiences, not all necessarily related to the sea. It becomes clear that this is more a book about the author herself, complete with imagined psychoanalytic sessions and tongue-in-cheek reminiscences of her many travels. In fairness, she does a masterful job of conveying how her fascination with flotsam is both literal and metaphorical: how fate and circumstance guide floating objects as well as our own lives. For those of you who enjoy witty autobiography for its own sake, you may be as interested as she is in the details of how she got drunk in Finland or the life stories of people obsessed with collecting flotsam in their yards. I suspect it is less so for those who choose this book based simply on its title.
Fesho
The author has travelled all over the world and beachcombed. She uses humor to teach us about ocean currents that take items from say Japan to the Washington state coast. I was expecting a book about beachcombing, another quick read about glass floats and driftwood. But this book is so much more than that. Skye explains currents. She explains about sperm whales that regurgitate a product that can be found on some beaches, then warns us about buying this products on the internet. (It's illegal in the states to purchase products from sperm whales because they are an endangered species.)

She also writes about the problem of dumping wastes in our oceans, and how that affects the food chain.

All of this is done in a highly readable writing style, laced with a sharp humor. Weaving through the book is a tale about an item she found at Alkai Beach in Seattle, but she discarded thinking she couldn't possibly carry one more item. She regrets having tossed it.

I'm glad I purchased and read this book. Now, I must go...beachcombing!
Wanenai
This is a book for filling your head with amazing facts to regurgitate when walking on the beach with friends or children. I can attest to the latter's fascination with tales of astronaut poop, and the origins of ambergris, the fragrant sea-borne product of whale regurgitation.

The book collects together stories from across the globe and over the centuries, in styles reminiscent of People Magazine (with photographs), Tattler and National Geographic. Moody has a journalist's eye for detail, and a storyteller's ability to inject dry facts with human interest. Her name-dropping is both cheeky and fun. She covers whimsical topics (floating phalluses) and serious ones (the proliferation of plastic garbage in the tidal gyres of the Pacific), but it's a quick read, ideal for say, a flight to Melanesia (home of the cargo cultists).

The book could do with an index, to allow the reader to locate and re-read some of the more interesting tales. And, there was an unfortunate bobble in the explanation of why driftwood floats. But neither criticism detracts from what is an entertaining and informative read. I recommend it.
Gralinda
This is my second copy. I lent my first copy out so many times I don't know where it ended up...so I got an extra! Very interesting book when you live on an island in the middle of nowhere and you just wonder where the heck is all this stuff coming from???? ;)
Llallayue
This is a book for a rarified audience. For those who truly enjoy beach-combing and wondering where the oddments come from that wash up on their shores, here are some answers. For non-beach-combers/philosophers, this book would be of little interest. I enjoyed it greatly.
Ungall
Fascinating account of the author Skye Moody's own beachcombining discoveries and the stories of other beachcombers (treasure hunters) she's met around the world. She combines science, history, lore & legends. It's easy to read and understand. Loved it!
Muniath
This book is partly a memoir of advanced beachcombing (which is referred to as being a "flotsamist" in the book, and is considered a far superior pursuit to beachcombing), and part exhaustive non-fiction spiel regarding anything involving things floating around in oceans. There are sections about ambergris, amber, sea beans (I had never even heard of sea beans before reading this), messages in bottles, shells, treasure, beach glass, and other remarkable finds - as well as sections about currents and profiles of extraordinary "flotsamists."Frankly, though, about half way through it goes from a structured book to a slapdash collection of short blog entries about anything the author thought might be appropriate for the book. But regardless of that there is enough material here to maintain interest and if you are able to remember what you read you can become the local know-it-all with respect to flotsam, jetsam, and lagan (basically flotsam that sinks).