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by Jeanette A. Thomas,Cynthia F. Moss,Marianne Vater

eBook Echolocation in Bats and Dolphins download ISBN: 0226795985
Author: Jeanette A. Thomas,Cynthia F. Moss,Marianne Vater
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (December 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 631
ePub: 1515 kb
Fb2: 1971 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lrf lit lrf azw
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Echolocation in Bats and. has been added to your Cart. Jeanette A. Thomas is a professor of biology at Western Illinois University.

Echolocation in Bats and. Marianne Vater is a professor in the Department of Physiology and Cell Biology at the University of Potsdam, Germany.

Jeanette Thomas, Cynthia Moss, Marianne Vater

Jeanette Thomas, Cynthia Moss, Marianne Vater.

Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text. Bats have evolved a very complex yet robust sonar system capable of echolocation performances far beyond the current state of the art in robotics,. Using their sonar systems, bats are able to navigate in complex environments, detect and hunt prey, find roosting places and build a spatial memory map ..

Thomas, Jeanette . Moss, Cynthia . Vater, Marianne, eds. (2004). Echolocation in bats and dolphins. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. Elemens, Coen P. A. F. Mead; L. Jakobsen; J. M. Ratcliffe (2011). Superfast Muscles Set Maximum Call Rate in Echolocating Bats". Journal of Comparative Physiology A. 182 (2): 203–215. Szewczak, J. E. Arnett (2007).

Dolphins need echolocation to navigate, locate prey, hunt, protect themselves from predators in murky waters or where . Thomas, Cynthia F. Moss, Marianne Vater. University of Chicago Press, 2004.

Dolphins need echolocation to navigate, locate prey, hunt, protect themselves from predators in murky waters or where there is no sunlight and to communicate. In fact, in deep dark waters, their sense of sight is almost nil, but they do not need it because they can detect and chase fast prey through the emission of sounds. Most odontocete cetaceans can emit very high-frequency sounds. In this sense, the frequencies vary according to the species, but there are general characteristics in all dolphins.

Cynthia Moss, Jeanette Thomas, Marianne Vater, Jeanette A. Moss. Cynthia F. Moss, Jeanette A. Thomas, Cynthia Moss, Jeanette Thomas, Marianne Vater. Join Chegg Study and get: Guided textbook solutions created by Chegg experts. Learn from step-by-step solutions for over 34,000 ISBNs in Math, Science, Engineering, Business and more. Answers in a pinch from experts and subject enthusiasts all semester long.

Not all bats use echolocation, but those that do have a range of frequencies for different purposes and techniques . Jeanette Thomas, Cynthia Moss and Marianne Vater, Echolocation in Bats and Dolphins (University of Chicago Press, 2004).

Not all bats use echolocation, but those that do have a range of frequencies for different purposes and techniques for preventing themselves becoming deafened by their own sounds. Some prey have evolved ways of detecting when bats are emitting high frequencies in their direction, and some fish have adapted to detect the sounds dolphins use to find them. Kate Jones Professor of Ecology and Biodiversity at University College London. Gareth Jones Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Bristol.

Jeanette A.

Echolocation is a form of acoustics that uses active sonar to locate objects. Many animals, such as bats and dolphins, use this method to hunt, to avoid predators, and to navigate by emitting sounds and then analyzing the reflected waves. Animals with the ability of echolocation rely on multiple receivers to allow a better perception of the objects’ distance and direction

Although bats and dolphins live in very different environments, are vastly different in size, and hunt different kinds of prey, both groups have evolved similar sonar systems, known as echolocation, to locate food and navigate the skies and seas. While much research has been conducted over the past thirty years on echolocation in bats and dolphins, this volume is the first to compare what is known about echolocation in each group, to point out what information is missing, and to identify future areas of research.Echolocation in Bats and Dolphins consists of six sections: mechanisms of echolocation signal production; the anatomy and physiology of signal reception and interpretation; performance and cognition; ecological and evolutionary aspects of echolocation mammals; theoretical and methodological topics; and possible echolocation capabilities in other mammals, including shrews, seals, and baleen whales. Animal behaviorists, ecologists, physiologists, and both scientists and engineers who work in the field of bioacoustics will benefit from this book.