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by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

eBook The Hidden Life of Deer: Lessons from the Natural World download ISBN: 006179211X
Author: Elizabeth Marshall Thomas
Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (November 2, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1572 kb
Fb2: 1261 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lit txt mobi mbr
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas began leaving food in small piles around her farmhouse. The book is less about the hidden life of deer and more about her rationalization for feeding the ones that live on her large track of undeveloped land

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas began leaving food in small piles around her farmhouse. Soon she had over thirty deer coming to her fields, and her naturalist's eye was riveted. The book is less about the hidden life of deer and more about her rationalization for feeding the ones that live on her large track of undeveloped land. There are interesting very sporadic pieces of trivia about the elegant mammal, but also a great deal of conjecture by the author.

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas (born September 13, 1931) is an American author. She has published fiction and non-fiction books and articles on animal behavior, Paleolithic life, and the !Kung Bushmen of the Kalahari Desert. Thomas was born to anthropologist Lorna Marshall and Laurence K. Marshall, co-founder of the Raytheon Corporation. She is the sister of ethnographic filmmaker John Marshall. She was raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts and attended Abbot Academy in Andover, Massachusetts.

The book a hidden life of deer is a great book that I recommend to anyone who is a fan of animals and how intelligent they are. .

In a way it was a postscript of life at home to The Old Way: A Story of the First People. That was a wonderful book of the hunter/gatherers of the Kalahari that the author knew so well as 'home' herself, and written about in such depth. The book a hidden life of deer is a great book that I recommend to anyone who is a fan of animals and how intelligent they are. T did a amazing job in showing us how deer really think and how society has the wrong idea of them.

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas began leaving food in small piles around her farmhouse

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas began leaving food in small piles around her farmhouse. Just as she did in her beloved books The Hidden Life of Dogs and Tribe of Tiger, Thomas describes a network of rules that have allowed earth's species to coexist for millions of years. Most of us have lost touch with these rules, yet they are a deep part of us, from our ancient evolutionary past. The Hidden Life of Deer is a narrative masterpiece and a naturalist's delight.

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas - whose previous books include The Hidden Life of Dogs and Tribe of Tiger, a hidden-lives of cats - lives in New Hampshire, where officials ask the population to refrain from feeding the deer, for various reasons: the deer may become overly dependent.

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas - whose previous books include The Hidden Life of Dogs and Tribe of Tiger, a hidden-lives of cats - lives in New Hampshire, where officials ask the population to refrain from feeding the deer, for various reasons: the deer may become overly dependent on the humans, and the humans will become overly possessive of the deer, to name just two. Acorns are a dietary staple of white-tailed deer and other species, and in a year bereft of acorns, Thomas decides to feed the deer store-bought corn.

Lessons from the Natural World. Elizabeth Marshall Thomas. The notion to write this book came from feeding corn to deer in the winter in south-central New Hampshire. This book is dedicated to my granddaughters, Zoë, Ariel, and Margaret; to my grandsons, David and Jasper; and to my great-grandson, Jacoby. I may have other great-grandchildren in time, and this book is dedicated to them too, but I cannot name them here because they have yet to be born. May the natural world in all its present wonder be there for them and for all children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. I didn’t know much about them except that they seemed to like corn. I wanted to know more.

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Read The Hidden Life of Deer, by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas online on Bookmate – In The Hidden Life of Deer, Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, the New York Times bestselling author of The Hidden Life of Do. In The Hidden Life of Deer, Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, the New York Times bestselling author of The Hidden Life of Dogs, turns her attention to wild deer, and the many lessons we can learn by observing nature. A narrative masterpiece and a naturalist’s delight, The Hidden Life of Deer is based on the twelve months Thomas, a renowned anthropologist, spent studying the local deer population near her home in New Hampshire.

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Elizabeth Marshall Thomas. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. The hidden life of deer : lessons from the natural world Elizabeth Marshall Thomas. Book's title: The hidden life of deer : lessons from the natural world Elizabeth Marshall Thomas. Library of Congress Control Number: 2009002777. International Standard Book Number (ISBN)

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In The Hidden Life of Deer, Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, the New York Times bestselling author of The Hidden Life of Dogs, turns her attention to wild deer, and the many lessons we can learn by observing nature. A narrative masterpiece and a naturalist’s delight, The Hidden Life of Deer is based on the twelve months Thomas, a renowned anthropologist, spent studying the local deer population near her home in New Hampshire.

Comments: (7)
Pettalo
I have no idea how I came across this book or why, but I'm so glad I did. I don't know what I enjoyed more, reading and learning about the deer (and the trees, and caterpillars, and fungi, and turkeys, etc. etc.) or simply spending time with this author, who strikes me as being the absolute best sort of person. She is astonishingly thoughtful and considerate, and I mean that in the sense that she truly does think through and consider every single decision she makes, even things that most of us would consider beneath our attention, like whether or not to feed the deer or fumigate for fleas. She weighs every possible consequence and outcome of her actions, with remarkably deep appreciation and respect for the life around her. If only more people were like this! I am so happy to have found this author, and can't wait to read her other books.
FireWater
I, like this book's author, feed "our" local deer and follow each deer families successes and losses. I've learned much in 7 years and thought to read another persons story of feeding deer for the purpose of entertaining myself.

I was stunned and delighted to find a vast store of knowledge delivered in story-like form about the deer and other wildlife living on the east coast of the U.S. The book follows the author's learning curve while she fed the deer and wild turkeys living on her land.

Don't for a second think this is a dry book focusing solely on deer. Not a chance! The forest itself, a variety of the animals living there including wild turkeys, bobcats and even bear have been included in humorous, thought provoking and sometimes sad stories throughout the book.

While I felt the authors several mentions of Gaia, the earth personified as a person/Goddess was unnecessary and distracting, I still recommend that anyone interested in forest wildlife and their habits, living in the wilderness, or just want an entertaining true story that's not based in a city, pick up The Hidden Life of Deer. You'll not be disappointed.
Anicasalar
I have lived in an upscale bedroom community in SE Michigan for the last 11 years. We are fortunate enough to have many deer come to our backyard which conjoins a nature reserve. I have learned so much about deer behavior, habits, life-style, etc., but Ms. Thomas expanded and added to my knowledge base, which I am grateful for.
Anyone who wants to understand these wonderful beings, in depth, should purchase the book. Even though it was written years ago, it remains extremely relevant.
Be aware that she does go on a hunt with a neighbor, but does not hunt herself. While she is an advocate for deer, she is an unbiased writer and does not demonize hunters....although in all honesty, I am not sure how anyone could kill these magnificent animals (or others!!).
Fiarynara
We often see deer when we walk in the nature preserve near our house, and our dog insists on chasing them. I wanted to understand them a bit better and had read Thomas's book on dogs which was very insightful. She's an excellent observer, and I had no idea that does will adopt orphaned fawns.

She also writes a bit about wild life management and raises a number of issues. Definitely worth reading.
Capella
I really liked this & learned several things I did not know before, even about trees. I live in an area where there are deer, esp in the state park. I love them & think they are beautiful, graceful beings so I was glad to learn more about how they live & what they do.
Ka
Thomas is great on dogs and on the San! people and her novels of prehistorical human life are fabulous. This has neither the knowledge nor the keen observations I've found so fine in her other work.
Hulbine
A wonderful look at nature surrounding us and revealing so much new information, comparing the many similarities between humans and other animals, including deer. I liked her total honesty and ability to see way beyond the clear and obvious. Her training, family background, and highly developed curiosity showed me the very intelligent ways deer manage their surroundings, and especially humans. A really good read!
The book is less about the hidden life of deer and more about her rationalization for feeding the ones that live on her large track of undeveloped land. There are interesting very sporadic pieces of trivia about the elegant mammal, but also a great deal of conjecture by the author. Ms. Thomas comes across as a somewhat eccentric, "tree-hugging" wildlife enthusiast who supports hunting but also believes human arrogance does a great deal of harm to nature. She takes umbrage with the other works pertaining to deer as nothing more than how-to books on killing the suckers. I agree. "The Hidden Life of Deer" has its heart in the right place, but there is simply not a lot of meat between the covers of this thing.

The book is more a journal about one year of her observing deer near their home in New Hampshire and interspersed with personal stories about her previous encounters with turkeys, black bears, bobcats, mice, rats etc. Some of the sections about how much corn she fed them, which groups ate first and so forth almost put me into a coma. It wouldn't have hurt if the book had had some witty wordplay, but it's likely not her forte. What kept me reading was the fact that the author lives about a hundred miles from my town in Maine. I could relate to the environment she described. Clearly, the ole gal loves nature and is continually surprised by new discoveries she observes. We should be grateful that there are people like Ms. Thomas that view the world with such wonder and try to make readers look as well as respect the natural beauty around us. Sadly, "The Hidden Life of Deer" falls short in her objective.