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eBook Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Soil: Results from an FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, 1992–1996 (Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences) download

by Gudni G. Hardarson,William J. Broughton

eBook Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Soil: Results from an FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, 1992–1996 (Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences) download ISBN: 0792352521
Author: Gudni G. Hardarson,William J. Broughton
Publisher: Springer; Partly reprinted from PLANT AND SOIL, 1999 edition (February 28, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 168
ePub: 1795 kb
Fb2: 1264 kb
Rating: 4.8
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Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Bibliographic Information. Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Soil. William J. Broughton.

Bibliographic Information. Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences.

Use of better tracking methods will help enhance biological nitrogen fixation and thus grain legume yields, while reducing their reliance on soil- and/or fertilizer-nitrogen. This volume will be invaluable to scientists working on biological nitrogen fixation, soil microbial ecology and legume production.

Soil and Water Management & Crop Nutrition Section, FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory. Role of legumes in sustainable cropping systems. rRNA based identification and detection systems for rhizobia and other bacteria. Use of marker genes in competition studies of Rhizobium.

The Conceptual Ecology of the Human Microbiome.

Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Rethinking the Theoretical Foundation of Sociobiology. Wilson et al. A Symbiotic View of Life: We Have Never Been Individuals. Gilbert et al. The Conceptual Ecology of the Human Microbiome.

by William J.

Published on Jul 1, 2000in Geoderma.

Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Soil Gudni G. Hardarson; William J. Broughton Springer 9780792352525 : Suitable for scientists working on biological nitrogen fixation, soil microbial ecolog.

Grain legume crops, e.g. common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and soyabeans (Glycine max L.) are amongst the main sources of protein in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Their high protein content derive from their ability, in symbiosis with Rhizobium bacteria, to fix atmospheric nitrogen. Incorporating contributions from molecular biologists, microbiologists, plant breeders and soil scientists, this volume reports the results of an FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (1992-1996), whose main objective was to develop molecular biological methods to study rhizobial ecology. Use of better tracking methods will help enhance biological nitrogen fixation and thus grain legume yields, while reducing their reliance on soil- and/or fertilizer-nitrogen. This volume will be invaluable to scientists working on biological nitrogen fixation, soil microbial ecology and legume production.