carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Plant Growth Regulators (Tertiary Level Biology)

eBook Plant Growth Regulators (Tertiary Level Biology) download

by Jeremy A. Roberts

eBook Plant Growth Regulators (Tertiary Level Biology) download ISBN: 0216924782
Author: Jeremy A. Roberts
Publisher: Springer; 1 edition (June 1, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 190
ePub: 1859 kb
Fb2: 1558 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi docx rtf doc
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

Plant Growth Regulators.

Plant Growth Regulators. What are plant growth regulators? In the title, and throughout the text, we have adopted this expression to describe a population of endogenous molecules and synthetic compounds of similar structure that are be­ lieved to play important roles in the regulation of plant differentiation and development. For many years, plant scientists have endeavoured to understand the nature and action of plant growth regulators and, as a result, an awesome quantity of written material now exists describing these chemicals and their effects. The combination of these three disciplines within the book is clear evidence of this. Calcium Expression biochemistry biology biosynthesis cell biology development gene expression growth metabolism plant plant growth plant physiology protein regulation. Authors and affiliations. Series: Tertiary Level Biology. Roberts, Jeremy A. 1988. Molecular Enzymology. Wharton, Christopher W. 1981.

Plant Growth Regulators book. As we all are aware that plants do require light, water, oxygen and minerals and other nutrition for their growth and develop. Apart from these external requirements, plants do depend on certain organic compounds to signal, regulate and control the growth of plants. These are collectively called as Plant Growth Regulators. There are different types of Plant Growth Regulators, which are also referred to as phytohormones or plant hormones. Let’s learn about them in more detail below.

Plant growth regulators (Tertiary level biology). EAN/UPC/ISBN Code 9780412016615. Brand Chapman and Hall.

Condition: Used: Good.

Different growth regulators such as, Gibberelic acid (GA3) (F1), 4-Chloro phenoxy acetic acid(4-CPA) (F2) and Flora . An experiment was conducted to study the influence of different growth chemicals on growth, fruit yield and quality attributes of strawberry.

Different growth regulators such as, Gibberelic acid (GA3) (F1), 4-Chloro phenoxy acetic acid(4-CPA) (F2) and Flora (Nitrobenzene 20. . Different growth regulators such as, Gibberelic acid (GA3) (F1), 4-Chloro phenoxy acetic acid(4-CPA) (F2) and Flora (Nitrobenzene 20% w/w) (F3) were used as foliar feeding.

Plant Growth Regulators Chemical Messengers Hormones  In plants, many behavioral patterns and functions are controlled by hormones. These are chemical messengers influencing many patterns of plant development. Plant hormones – a natural substance (produced by plant) that acts to control plant activities. Hormones   Are produced in one part of a plant and then transported to other parts, where they initiate a response. They are stored in regions where stimulus are and then released for transport through either phloem or mesophyll when the appropriate stimulus occurs.

What are plant growth regulators? In the title, and throughout the text, we have adopted this expression to describe a population of endogenous molecules and synthetic compounds of similar structure that are be­ lieved to play important roles in the regulation of plant differentiation and development. For many years, plant scientists have endeavoured to understand the nature and action of plant growth regulators and, as a result, an awesome quantity of written material now exists describing these chemicals and their effects. In this book we have aimed to distil this wealth of information into a more digestible form, and in particular we have focused our attention on a critical appraisal of the literature. The past few years have witnessed a change of emphasis in plant growth regulator research, which has been fuelled by powerful new techniques in molecular and cell biology. Today we can do more than just apply a plant growth regulator and quantify its effects; we have reached an exciting crossroads where plant scientists, molecular bio­ logists and chemists can pool their expertise and apply it to the out­ standing problems in this area. The combination of these three disciplines within the book is clear evidence of this. In keeping with a volume of this size, we have assumed that the reader has a sound knowledge of plant physiology and biochemistry. However, wherever possible, we have highlighted useful reviews which provide background information, along with recent publications that have contributed significantly to the literature.