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by Linda Cockburn

eBook Living The Good Life: How One Family Changed Their World From Their Own Backyard download ISBN: 1740663128
Author: Linda Cockburn
Publisher: Hardie Grant (April 3, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1521 kb
Fb2: 1222 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: azw lrf docx rtf
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Biological Sciences

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Linda Cockburn's "Living the Good Life" is an Aussie classic

Linda Cockburn's "Living the Good Life" is an Aussie classic. Or it deserves to be. The book tells the story, in diary form, of how one Australian family became disillusioned with the suburban dream, connecting the dots between their lifestyle and the wider balance that needs to be met between human needs and planetary health. Then, unlike most of the rest of us, they actively set about changing their lives to be more sustainable - and surprised themselves by finding happiness and valuable life lessons along the way.

Days : Hours : Minutes : Seconds.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Living the Good Life : How One Family . Inspiring and challenging, this chronicle of a unique household experiment takes readers inside one family's environmental test

Inspiring and challenging, this chronicle of a unique household experiment takes readers inside one family's environmental test. Already mindful of the impact human activity has on the environment, the author and her family decided to take a further step towards thoughtful living by aiming for complete domestic sustainability.

How One Family Changed Their World from Their Own Backyard.

Living the Good Life : How One Family Changed Their World from Their Own Backyard. For six months, Linda Cockburn and her family grew, made, or bartered for their food, generated their own power, collected their own rainwater, and aimed not to spend a single penny. All to discover if domestic sustainability really is possible in the modern world? This volume takes you through the author's diary-style entries.

Linda Cockburn was born in New Zealand in 1968. Of her 5 siblings she was judged the least likely to garden due to a horror of accumulating dirt under her fingernails, but now she's managed to accrue at least a few kilos of that

Linda Cockburn was born in New Zealand in 1968. Of her 5 siblings she was judged the least likely to garden due to a horror of accumulating dirt under her fingernails, but now she's managed to accrue at least a few kilos of that. She recently made the mistake of pondering the ability to live in a domestically sustainable way on 2180 sq m, and spent the last five years working towards that goal, dragging her partner Trev and son Caleb with her. E-Publication Description. Format code not yet allocated. Snowbooks Ltd. Date of Publication

Paperback published 2006-02-01 by Hardie Grant Books. Fed up with consumerism an Australian family takes on the challenges of growing all their own food, living self-sufficiently and enduring six months without spending a dollar

Paperback published 2006-02-01 by Hardie Grant Books. Alert if: New Price below. Fed up with consumerism an Australian family takes on the challenges of growing all their own food, living self-sufficiently and enduring six months without spending a dollar.

Our attempt to go six months without spending a dollar  . ember in The Netherlands but I can't find it anywhere on the online book stores anymore. 21 March 2017 at 19:00. I love love this book. PagesMediaBooks and magazinesBookLiving the Good LifePosts. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español. 4 September ·. I hereby take the pledge to lay down my Bitch Schtick and never pick it up again.

Living the Good Life. How One Family Changed Their World from Their Own Backyard. Published April 1, 2007 by Hardie Grant Books. Internet Archive Wishlist.

Inspiring and challenging, this chronicle of a unique household experiment takes readers inside one family’s environmental test. Already mindful of the impact human activity has on the environment, the author and her family decided to take a further step towards thoughtful living by aiming for complete domestic sustainability. For six months, the Cockburns grew, bartered for, and made everything they ate; used exclusively solar power; collected rainwater for drinking, cleaning, and cooking; parked the cars and turned to bicycles; and aimed to not spend a single dollar. From just their average home on an average-sized lot, they experienced success, surprises, and challenges in their quest—all while learning about themselves as a family. Whether readers are looking for lessons on adopting some—or all—of the Cockburns' practices or are just curious about what it might take to “do it yourself” even more deeply, this story will bring them along for the ride.
Comments: (7)
Nenayally
Even though author lives in Australia, this book shows the real struggle in today's modern world to be self-reliant. I love the sense of humor and the facts all thrown in together. I loved it.
Winawel
This is a great book even if you aren't into living a sustainable life. It is very entertaining and motivating if you are into living sustainably. Linda's "journal" entries are fun and informative and make you sad when finish the book.
Thoginn
The book might be more interesting to Australians than to this american. The author decided they would live for 6 months without spending a dollar (except for insurance, taxes, medical expenses, etc.), and they managed to do it by bartering produce for toilet paper and other necessities. They fueled their motivation for such a great sacrifice by promising themselves a spending spree at the end of the six months. The backbone of the book is a daily diary which frequently complains of copious sweating and supplies blow-by-blow descriptions of arguments or the details of stopping to play a game with her son. It is laced with information such as how to read a water meter in Australia, how many litres of water it takes to produce various cotton articles, the nutritional value of snails. There are occasional recipes sprinkled in, references to inexperienced gardening practices, vague references to being off the water, but no explanation of how they processed their own water. Or at least not in the part I read. I decided it wasn't worth wading through it hoping to find out something useful. There are pretty color pictures in the middle that are inspiring, but I found the account to be discouraging. Her comments that the rats in the garden weren't as bad as the brown snakes that they attracted, or the tale of lighting incense to get rid of the smell of the rat that died in their walls, just didn't enthuse me a lot for backyard gardening.
Windforge
Linda Cockburn's "Living the Good Life" is an Aussie classic. Or it deserves to be.

The book tells the story, in diary form, of how one Australian family became disillusioned with the suburban dream, connecting the dots between their lifestyle and the wider balance that needs to be met between human needs and planetary health.

Then, unlike most of the rest of us, they actively set about changing their lives to be more sustainable - and surprised themselves by finding happiness and valuable life lessons along the way.

If a fault will be found by reviewers here at Amazon, it is that the book *is* very Australia-centric, which may be challenging for some international audience unfamiliar with Australian idioms, political systems, ways of managing waste etc.

But for me I find this refreshing after the massive glut of US books on the market that simply expect everyone to be a US citizen familiar with *their* ways. It's a reminder that the world is not America, and many of us live in ways that are strikingly different from the US standard, with all its plusses and minuses.

Also, the overarching themes and challenges of the book - dealing with pests, reducing waste, finding ways to eat seasonally, managing food gluts - are relevant to anyone interested in growing and harvesting their own, no matter where in the world they live.

Linda Cockburn and her family moved from the home in Queensland in which the book is set a few years ago now, and are currently (as of 2010) building their own straw bale home down in Tasmania, Australia.

I'm guessing (and hoping) that she will set this new experience into another book. I look forward to reading it.
Stoneshaper
I really enjoed reading this book. It takes place in Austrailia but Americans can easily relate to it as well. The author's writing style is informative, realistic and humorous at times which makes it a nice read. The family spent 6 months with the intentions of not using a car, growing their own food and trying to be as self sufficient and environmentally friendy to our earth as possible. Though most of us would not go to the extent they did to live this simply I think any reader will be inspired to take some of their ideas and implement them in their on life style. This book is especially good for helping us think about living simply during today's economic hardships.
Togar
This is a fantastic read, could not put it down. The way the author expresses the issues and facts and incorporates them in the way they have chosen to live their life is inspiring. If you have any interest in the planet, you will find information in this book fascinating. Each person can adapt different elements into their life, big and small.

Oh and did I mention it has humorous bits where you will find yourself belly laughing...

Buy the book, you will not regret it.
EXIBUZYW
I Loved this book. Its a very realistic look at the good life. A very good read as well as an inspiration. They set their rules and mostly stuck to it. A very good illustration of what can be achieved by real people in real life. If you have an interest is self sufficiency, downshifting or simplifying your life, this is a great read.