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eBook Mysterious Universe download

by James Hopwood Jeans

eBook Mysterious Universe download ISBN: 0404147429
Author: James Hopwood Jeans
Publisher: Ams Pr Inc (June 1, 1933)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1890 kb
Fb2: 1423 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mbr lrf mobi rtf
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Astronomy and Space Science

by James Hopwood Jeans (Author)

by James Hopwood Jeans (Author). ISBN-13: 978-0404147426. Jeans states in his Foreword, "There is a widespread conviction that the new teachings of astronomy and physical science are destined to produce an immense change in our outlook on the universe as a whole, and on our views as to the significance of human life. The question at issue is ultimately one for philosophic discussion, but before the philosophers have a right to speak, science ought first to be asked to tell all she can as to ascertained facts and provisional hypotheses.

The Mysterious Universe is a popular science book by the British astrophysicist Sir James Jeans, first published in 1930 by the Cambridge University Press. In the United States, it was published by Macmillan

The Mysterious Universe is a popular science book by the British astrophysicist Sir James Jeans, first published in 1930 by the Cambridge University Press. In the United States, it was published by Macmillan. The book is an expanded version of the Rede Lecture delivered at the University of Cambridge in 1930. It begins with a full-page citation of the famous passage in Plato's Republic, Book VII, laying out the allegory of the cave.

An Elementary Treatise On Theoretical Mechanics.

Julian Huxley, E. Mellanby, . Haldane, William Lawrence Bragg, James Hopwood Jeans. Dynamische Theorie Der Gase. An Introduction to the Kinetic Theory of Gases. An Elementary Treatise On Theoretical Mechanics. Haldane, E. Mellanby, Julian S Huxley, James Hopwood Jeans, William Lawrence Bragg, . Tags: The Mysterious Universe. Home Books James Hopwood Jeans. The Mysterious Universe is a popular science book by the British astrophysicist Sir James Jeans, first published in 1930 by the Cambridge University Press.

The Universe Around Us book. Sir James Hopwood Jeans (11 de septiembre de 1877, Ormskirk, Lancashire – 16 de septiembre de 1946, Dorking, Surrey) fue un físico, astrónomo y matemático británico

The Universe Around Us book. Sir James Hopwood Jeans (11 de septiembre de 1877, Ormskirk, Lancashire – 16 de septiembre de 1946, Dorking, Surrey) fue un físico, astrónomo y matemático británico. Recibió su educación en el Merchant Taylors' School, Northwood y el Trinity College de Cambridge. Acabó en segundo puesto en la universidad en el Tripos (un reconocimiento de la Universidad de Cambridge) de 1898.

The Mysterious Universe is a science book by the British astrophysicist Sir James Jeans. Sir James Hopwood Jeans OM FRS (11 September 1877 - 16 September 1946) was an English physicist, astronomer and mathematician. It is an expanded version of the Rede Lecture delivered at the University of Cambridge in 1930, and begins with a full-page citation of the famous passage in Plato’s Republic, Book VII, laying out the allegory of the cave.

Cutter is an Australian soldier finishing his tour of duty in Iraq. Now author James Hopwood introduces readers to Nathan Cutter in Hopwood's Pro Se Single Shot Signature Series- Vengeance. All he wants to do is get home to his wife and daughter in Sydney. But when his family become innocent victims in an underworld turf war, and the police are too gutless to act, Cutter takes the law into his own hands. In Cutter's Law, the debut digital single in the series, Cutter is an Australian soldier finishing his tour of duty in Iraq.

(September 11 1877 in Ormskirk, Lancashire – September 16 1946 in Dorking, Surrey ) was an English physicist, astronomer and mathematician. This theory is not accepted today. Jeans, along with Arthur Eddington, is a founder of British cosmology.

The Mysterious Universe is a science book by the British astrophysicist Sir James Jeans

The Mysterious Universe is a science book by the British astrophysicist Sir James Jeans. It makes frequent reference to the quantum theory of radiation, begun by Max Planck in 1900, to Einstein’s general relativity, and to the new theories of quantum mechanics of Heisenberg and Schrödinger, of whose philosophical perplexities the author seemed well aware

Book by Jeans, James Hopwood
Comments: (3)
digytal soul
Sir James Jeans (1877-1946) was an English physicist, astronomer and mathematician. (Bertrand Russell was fond of quoting him is his books such as Religion and Science.)

Jeans states in his Foreword, "There is a widespread conviction that the new teachings of astronomy and physical science are destined to produce an immense change in our outlook on the universe as a whole, and on our views as to the significance of human life. The question at issue is ultimately one for philosophic discussion, but before the philosophers have a right to speak, science ought first to be asked to tell all she can as to ascertained facts and provisional hypotheses. Then, and then only, may discussion legitimately pass into the realms of philosophy."

He states in the opening chapter, "Into such a universe we have stumbled, if not exactly by mistake, as least as the result of what may properly be described as an accident. The use of such a word need not imply any surprise that our earth exists, for accidents will happen, and if the universe goes on for long enough, every conceivable accident is likely to happen in time.... In the same way, millions and millions of stars wandering blindly through space for millions of millions of years are bound to meet with every sort of accident, and so are bound to produce a certain limited number of planetary systems in time."

Here are some representative quotations:

"It is always the puzzle of time that brings our thoughts to a standstill."
"Most men find the final dissolution of the universe as distasteful a thought as the dissolution of their own personality, and man's strivings after personal immortality have their macroscopic counterpart in these more sophisticated strivings after an imperishable universe."
"These concepts reduce the whole universe to a world of light, potential or existent, so that the whole story of its creation can be told with perfect accuracy and completeness in the six words, 'God said, "Let there be light."'"
"We have already considered with disfavour the possibility of the universe having been planned by a biologist or an engineer; from the intrinsic evidence of his creation, the Great Architect of the Universe now begins to appear as a pure mathematician."
"Modern scientific theory compels us to think of the creator as working outside time and space, which are part of his creation, just as the artist is outside his canvas."
Shadowbourne
Sir James Jeans (1877-1946) was an English physicist, astronomer and mathematician. (Bertrand Russell was fond of quoting him is his books such as Religion and Science.)

Jeans states in his Foreword, "There is a widespread conviction that the new teachings of astronomy and physical science are destined to produce an immense change in our outlook on the universe as a whole, and on our views as to the significance of human life. The question at issue is ultimately one for philosophic discussion, but before the philosophers have a right to speak, science ought first to be asked to tell all she can as to ascertained facts and provisional hypotheses. Then, and then only, may discussion legitimately pass into the realms of philosophy."

He states in the opening chapter, "Into such a universe we have stumbled, if not exactly by mistake, as least as the result of what may properly be described as an accident. The use of such a word need not imply any surprise that our earth exists, for accidents will happen, and if the universe goes on for long enough, every conceivable accident is likely to happen in time.... In the same way, millions and millions of stars wandering blindly through space for millions of millions of years are bound to meet with every sort of accident, and so are bound to produce a certain limited number of planetary systems in time."

Here are some representative quotations:

"It is always the puzzle of time that brings our thoughts to a standstill."
"Most men find the final dissolution of the universe as distasteful a thought as the dissolution of their own personality, and man's strivings after personal immortality have their macroscopic counterpart in these more sophisticated strivings after an imperishable universe."
"These concepts reduce the whole universe to a world of light, potential or existent, so that the whole story of its creation can be told with perfect accuracy and completeness in the six words, 'God said, "Let there be light."'"
"We have already considered with disfavour the possibility of the universe having been planned by a biologist or an engineer; from the intrinsic evidence of his creation, the Great Architect of the Universe now begins to appear as a pure mathematician."
"Modern scientific theory compels us to think of the creator as working outside time and space, which are part of his creation, just as the artist is outside his canvas."
Tam
This text was published in 1931, after the fall of Wall Street, when people were feeling uneasy about world tensions and a faltering economy. Much like today! Jeans was a famous scientist and thinker, which comes through his work like a beam of golden light. I'm usually attracted to the arcane, the esoteric, but this text held my interest and then some. Jeans develops his ideas in the following chapters:
--The Dying Sun
--The New World of Modern Physics
--Matter and Radiation
--Relativity and the Ether
--Into the Deep Waters
Jeans forwards the concept of radiation--all around us, through us--as germane to understanding life itself. Apparently he was inspired to develop this idea from one of his famous friends, Dr. Oscar Brunler, who also hit on radiation theory in his writings. Although we have progressed miles in our understanding of physics, this text if nothing else helps us to understand the dawning of its importance in everyday life. Well written and thought-provoking!