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by June Goodfield,Stephen Toulmin

eBook The Fabric of the Heavens: The Development of Astronomy and Dynamics download ISBN: 0226808483
Author: June Goodfield,Stephen Toulmin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; New edition edition (November 1, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 294
ePub: 1779 kb
Fb2: 1946 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: doc azw rtf lit
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Astronomy and Space Science

Stephen Toulmin and June Goodfield, outline the history of celestial thinking from Egyptian and Babylonian times to the Newtonian Copernician revolution that erupted into our visualization of the Y2K space

Stephen Toulmin and June Goodfield, outline the history of celestial thinking from Egyptian and Babylonian times to the Newtonian Copernician revolution that erupted into our visualization of the Y2K space. Until Kepler, Sun-centered calculations provided no better fit to observational data than Earth-centered models

Goodfield has written several books on the history of her native Sussex, including Deans Place (2006) and . The Fabric of the Heavens: The Development of Astronomy and Dynamics (with Stephen Toulmin) (1961). The Architecture of Matter (with Stephen Toulmin) (1962).

Goodfield has written several books on the history of her native Sussex, including Deans Place (2006) and Stanmer & the Pelhams (2007) and Wingrove and the Churchill Connection, in collaboration with fellow historian Peter Robinson. Her work Rivers of Time: Why is everyone talking to Philippa? (2008) was inspired by a seventeenth-century memorial on the island of Nevis. The Discovery of Time (with Stephen Toulmin) (1965). The Siege of Cancer (1975).

Stephen Toulmin and June Goodfield

Stephen Toulmin and June Goodfield. Stephen Toulmin and June Goodfield. Praise for The Fabric of the Heavens: "I cannot remember when I last went through a book, any book, with such all-devouring zest.

Praise for The Fabric of the Heavens: "I cannot remember when I last went through a book, any book, with such all-devouring zest. What is more, even the most complex technicalities are reduced to a positively crystalline clarity: If I can understand them, anyone can. The Fabric of the Heavens is, in every sense of the word, an eye-opener.

Stephen Toulmin, June Goodfield. This pelican book is a history of astronomy which is very good at turning back the clock, and inviting the reader to consider schoolboy science once again as the grand mysteries that they once were

Stephen Toulmin, June Goodfield. This pelican book is a history of astronomy which is very good at turning back the clock, and inviting the reader to consider schoolboy science once again as the grand mysteries that they once were. The book is, in this way, reminding us moderns of how much we intellectually take for granted, and take for "obvious": such facts that are in fact no more plausible on the face value than competing pictures of how the world may work: Since Galileo and Newton, dynamics has been made a branch of mathematics, and we no longer stop to question whether this can be legitimately done.

Toulmin, Stephen Edelston; Goodfield, June, 1927-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by MishelP-loader on July 20, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Sayfa 166 To make his point, Oresme refuted in turn all the standard arguments against the idea of a rotating Earth. He tackled first the arguments from observation. If it is objected that the Heavens can be seen to move, then we can simply reply that all. Bu kitabın geri kalanı nerede? Kullanıcılar ne diyor?

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. The Development of Astronomy and Dynamics. by Stephen Edelston Toulmin, June Goodfield.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. Published June 1979 by Harpercollins College Div.

June Goodfield is a British scientist and writer of fiction and non-fiction. The fabric of the heavens : the development of astronomy and dynamics" (with Stephen Toulmin). Goodfield gave a short speech on the importance of leaving a written legacy behind and was joined at the event by World War Two singer Dame Vera Lynn and actor and explorer Brian Blessed.

The Fabric of the Heavens : The Development of Astronomy and Dynamics. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. The Fabric of the Heavens : The Development of Astronomy and Dynamics. Stephen Toulmin, June Goodfield.

Conceived as three companion volumes that form an introduction to the central ideas of the modern natural sciences, these books—intelligent, informative, and accessible—are an excellent source for those who have no technical knowledge of the subject.Praise for The Fabric of the Heavens:"I cannot remember when I last went through a book, any book, with such all-devouring zest. What is more, even the most complex technicalities are reduced to a positively crystalline clarity: If I can understand them, anyone can. The Fabric of the Heavens is, in every sense of the word, an eye-opener."—Peter Green, The Yorkshire Post"Not until the last chapter of the book is [the reader] allowed to think again wholly as a modern man has become accustomed, by common sense, to think. The discipline is admirably suited to the authors' task, and cunningly devised for the reader's edification—and, indeed, for his delight."—Physics TodayPraise for The Architecture of Matter:"The Architecture of Matter is to be warmly recommended. It is that rare achievement, a lively book which at the same time takes the fullest possible advantage of scholarly knowledge."—Charles C. Gillespie, New York Times Book Review"One is impressed by the felicity of the examples and by the lively clarity with which significant experiments and ideas are explained. . . . No other history of science is so consistently challenging."—Scientific AmericanPraise for The Discovery of Time:"A subject of absorbing interest . . . is presented not as a history of science, but as a chapter in the history of ideas from the ancient Greeks to our own time."—Times Literary Supplement
Comments: (4)
Modred
Great read lots of amazing information
OwerSpeed
Book was as advertised, arrived as forecast, and was good value for the money. The book is a good addition to my reference library.
Hellstaff
"All of planetary dynamics was a mess until Copernicus showed up, right? Sweeping away all Ptolmey's epicycles and deferents, he single-handedly gave birth to the modern conception of a Sun-centered planetary system. Right? Well, not exactly." Ryan Wyatt
*

Unfortunately, the history of astronomy didn't proceed along such a simple path. The story of our relationship with the stars and their celestial kins is ancient, fascinating, and full of awe. Stephen Toulmin and June Goodfield, outline the history of celestial thinking from Egyptian and Babylonian times to the Newtonian Copernician revolution that erupted into our visualization of the Y2K space.

The lives and works of Aristotle, Philoponus, Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton are duely explored, linking them into a geometric progression. Until Kepler, Sun-centered calculations provided no better fit to observational data than Earth-centered models. Copernicus's revolution in fact required decades to gain momentum, and the first standard-bearers favored only his mathematics over the older systems.

The Fabric of the Heavens is, in every sense of the word, an eye-opener. It was a first volume in a four-volume series, The Ancestry of Science: an introduction to the development of astronomy and its dynamics. The writers explore the contribution of the sciences, surveying noteworthy philosophical accounts of the scientific enterprise, the nature of theories, and the growth of scientific knowledge to early cosmological thinking.

Concentrating on the background of ancient science, ranging from the beginnings of celestial forecasting in Sumeria to the influences of Newton's thought on an evolving science. The writers use a compelling scientific and precise language to trace the history of ideas that made today's science. They develop the main concepts in philosophy of science, present science as an intellectual process that changed and promoted philosophy.

Stephen Toulmin is a British philosopher, and science historian, born in 1922, was influenced by Ludwig Wittgenstein, at Cambridge University. He was Professor at University of Southern California, was known for seminal work in modeling arguments and developing the case for the Return to Reason, vs. Rationality. He is the author of some twenty books, in those domains.
Eyalanev
"The Fabric of the Heavens" is the first in a series of three books, written in the 1960s, that attempt to outline the development of modern scientific thought. This first book deals with astronomy and dynamics, and the union of those two disciplines that created our modern ideas of the universe, forces, motion, etc.
Toulmin and Goodfield begin in ancient Babylon, where highly accurate mathematical techniques were used to calculate the positions of heavenly bodies. They move through several periods of Greek thought, through the medieval period and the flourishing of Islamic scholarship, on through the Renaissance, up to Newton, past Einstein, and on to the middle of the twentieth century. They are careful to show how and why past astronomers and natural philosophers asked the questions they did, why things that today appear to be common sense were inconceivable in the past, and why obviously brilliant people explained the world in ways we now see as misguided.
"The Fabric of the Heavens" is an amazing book, especially because of Toulmin and Goodfield's ability to make complex ideas clear to those of us who aren't physicists or astronomers. I was, however, somewhat dissatisfied near the end. Toulmin and Goodfield, while skilled at explaining the distant past, seem a bit slapdash describing the first half of the twentieth century, and, of course, do not describe the second half at all. The book also has a highly Western focus, probably because cosmological ideas in other parts of the world did not directly affect the development of modern science.
Nevertheless, "The Fabric of the Heavens" is fascinating, well-written, and enjoyable. I highly recommend it.