carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Rocket Dreams: How the Space Age Shaped Our Vision of a World Beyond....

eBook Rocket Dreams: How the Space Age Shaped Our Vision of a World Beyond.... download

by Marina Benjamin

eBook Rocket Dreams: How the Space Age Shaped Our Vision of a World Beyond.... download ISBN: 0099283654
Author: Marina Benjamin
Publisher: Vintage; New Ed edition (February 5, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1700 kb
Fb2: 1147 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: rtf lit mobi lrf
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Astronomy and Space Science

Benjamin's book may burn with a sense of a dream betrayed, but her smoldering, often cynical anger . This is how she discusses the unfortunate demise of our most brilliant NASA dreams

Benjamin's book may burn with a sense of a dream betrayed, but her smoldering, often cynical anger never blinds or paralyzes her narrative. This is how she discusses the unfortunate demise of our most brilliant NASA dreams. She casts most of the blame on the astronaughts completely; because she feels that by landing on the Moon, studying the Moon and spending vast amounts of money, energy and talk about the Moon, all that we wanted to do was speak of the Earth.

Rocket Dreams is about those solutions. about the places where the space program landed. In Rocket Dreams, an extraordinarily talented young writer named Marina Benjamin will take you on a journey to those landing sites

Rocket Dreams is about those solutions. In Rocket Dreams, an extraordinarily talented young writer named Marina Benjamin will take you on a journey to those landing sites. A visit with retired astronauts at a celebrity autograph show is a starting point down the divergent paths taken by the pioneers, including Edgar Mitchell, founder of the "church" of Noëtic Sciences

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Rocket Dreams: How the Space Age Shaped Our Vision of a World Beyond as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Marina Benjamin is a recovering space addict

Marina Benjamin is a recovering space addict. As a girl, she tells us, she was obsessed by the Apollo programme and its promise of a wild black yonder - a promise that, in the 1970s and since, seems to have been thoroughly broken. Rocket Dreams is an attempt to understand what that enthusiasm for space meant to those who held it, how it faded, and to what extent the phenomenon of cyberspace is its resurrection, or re-enactment, or legacy.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Rising out of this prehistoric landscape is Merritt Island, a fat belt of white middle-class suburbia shaped like a clothespin and shored up by coastal dunes and brackish marshland. It is a place of little apparent distinction. With its rickety beach houses, green-blue swimming pools, and dowdy strip malls, Merritt Island looks like a poor cousin to the Florida Keys and life there follows the same idling rhythms of fishing and sunbathing.

In her new book Rocket Dreams: How the Space Age Shaped Our Vision of a World Beyond, Marina Benjamin .

In her new book Rocket Dreams: How the Space Age Shaped Our Vision of a World Beyond, Marina Benjamin argues that space exploration has shaped our worldviews in more ways than on. Benjamin thinks it is no coincidence that the first Earth Day on April 20, 1970, occurred in the midst of the Apollo program; or that one of the astronauts developed a new school of spiritualism; or that people "should be drawn to an innovative model for the domestic economy sprung free from the American space program by NASA administrator James Webb. Exploration shapes world views and changes cultures in unexpected ways, and so does lack of exploration.

Rocket Dreams is her quicksilver tour, teasing out the threads of imagination that once streamed into space, around a world .

Rocket Dreams is her quicksilver tour, teasing out the threads of imagination that once streamed into space, around a world that has shrunk but has grown complicated. The astronauts were the first explorers who could not tear themselves away from the sight of where they came from.

Benjamin's book may burn with a sense of a dream betrayed, but her smoldering, often cynical anger never blinds or paralyzes her narrative. Without feigning objectivity, she takes on a very tough question: what does space mean to us? Then she follows it through launch facilities, astronaut autograph sessions, alleged UFO crash sites in Roswell, and, apparently, into many a library.

Marina Benjamin is the author of four books: Rocket Dreams: How the Space Age Shaped Our Vision of a World Beyond (2003), Last Days in Babylon (2006), The Middlepause: On Turning Fifty (2016), and Insomnia (2018). A Mind in Transit: Marina Benjamin on Insomnia. A memoir on the liminal state of sleeplessness and mind wandering.

Rocket Dreams is a fast-moving, fact-filled study of how all the dreams that went in to moonflight in the '60s have found new homes and mutated into new fascination with space. It is about our unquenchable desire to reach out to other worlds, physical and imaginative.

Comments: (7)
Xtreem
Benjamin's book may burn with a sense of a dream betrayed, but her smoldering, often cynical anger never blinds or paralyzes her narrative. Without feigning objectivity, she takes on a very tough question: what does space mean to us? Then she follows it through launch facilities, astronaut autograph sessions, alleged UFO crash sites in Roswell, and, apparently, into many a library. Unlike most space writers, her facts check out completely. She's not kidding when she traces the modern dream of space-going utopias back to aviation fantasists such as Alfred Lawson. This is the guy who wrote in 1916 that airplanes would bring about the next phase of human development, a superior being known as "Alti-man" who would live in the sky. Echoes of this seemingly laughable notion persist to the present day in the lore of UFO enthusiasts and would-be space pioneers alike. Benjamin does a nice job showing how it's also alive and well among cybernauts building virtual-reality worlds for themselves. Rocket Dreams is a brutally honest journey that will shake spacers down to their core beliefs. For everyone else, it will provide loads of dry wit and some good laughs.
X-MEN
Sputnik was launched when I was in the first grade, and I have followed the space program with rapt attention ever since. But even though I count myself among the geekiest of space buffs, I've sometimes felt that there is a deep contradiction at the heart of the human spaceflight effort. I could never put my finger on it, but Marina Benjamin has.

For one, it never occurred to me that the mesmerizing short film "Powers of Ten," which has been widely shown in schools and museums for 30 years, has been unwittingly undermining the case that we will ever go anywhere in the cosmos. Space is just too vast and empty, as that film shows with visceral impact.

Benjamin uses another film, the 1972 Russian version of "Solaris," as the jumping off point for this thought: "Is mankind's push into the cosmos the result of a natural drive--an urge as deeply embedded as the other basic impulses, for example, the sex drive? Or are we in our determination to fling ourselves off the planet contravening the very essence of who we are?"

Elsewhere, she observes that commerce usually follows in exploration's wake, except that it hasn't really worked out that way for space. "Without successfully accommodating the interests of business, space could never measure up to the 'new frontier' legacy, much less become the 'final frontier'.... It would only be another Everest or another South Pole--which is to say, it would merely be a place whose emptiness and isolation piques our vanity." Wow, has she nailed it!

Her book will be upsetting to those who unreflectingly believe that we are destined to spread throughout the cosmos just as we spread across the Earth. But if you're interested in getting at the origin of that peculiar notion and want to have your mind jostled in a myriad of other ways, I encourage you to read this stimulating little book.
Zamo
What the author Marina Benjamin attempts to do in her book, is to hold serious discussions about the US Space Program and NASA and all the related, high-tech spin-offs of that fast-paced time. She did an excellent job of describing what she felt and what she saw: Ms Benjamin was raised in England and when she came out to the US, one of the first things she did was drive out to see the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. She was most dismayed to see all the Saturn V launch towers were gone.

The surrounding geography she describes as being a ghost town swamp, with acres of hungry yellowed grass - eager to swallow up the highway and all buildings surrounding the Space Center.

The once majestic Apollo rockets are still laying out there at the Space Center, but instead of gleaming white in the sun - they are instead..... decaying...rusting...and rotting. Not at all being inspiring or taking one's breath away in glorious display: in the fashion they deserve to be displayed.

She wonders what went wrong?

How did America come to abandon it's once lofty space goals?

She launches into beautifully written dialogue...take a look;

"...the pull of space has been understood to elicit in us a kind of spiritual phototropism, or flowering a desire to beleive that it is the better part of ourselves that responds to the call of the heavens. And so, when we dream of space travel, we dream of freedom and beauty; perfection and transcendence: we dream of what we may become."

Isn't that excellent?

She has alot more intellectual dialogue to offer up, and her theories of WHY we embarked on this magnificent journey up to the moon is deserving of winning distinguished writing awards and journalistic trophies.

In her attempt to explain our national drive to conquer the moon, she reels in our most grandiose insights...it's beautiful.

After she states the ideals of the Apollo program, she then launches into some negativity and of course, the national budget which destroyed all ideals that APOLLO had. Apollo 18, 19 and 20 were hurriedly shelved without any discussion it seems, and mysteriously Ms Benjamins wonders why Americans let go of the goals of the Moon and Mars to emotionlessly. This is how she discusses the unfortunate demise of our most brilliant NASA dreams.

She casts most of the blame on the astronaughts completely; because she feels that by landing on the Moon, studying the Moon and spending vast amounts of money, energy and talk about the Moon, all that we wanted to do was speak of the Earth.

We didn't really appreciate our planet until we left it.

Valid and interesting point...I only wish the author spent two chapters discussing the primal bond of Mother Earth and her native sons, who were astronaughts. She has some hostility towards them and further discussed it.

Her chapter on ROSWELL inspires me to take a long road trip out that way .... she warns that we may as well be on the surface of MARS when we're out there.

It was an amusing and fun chapter on that forlorn wide spot on the road...Roswell.

The place of alien dreams and possibly it is the UFO capitol of the nation.

She interviews the surviving local folks (who were alive at the time of the alien crash) who have some personal involvment with the alleged UFO crash from 1947. But she is a non-beleiver.

The book rambles on but hits a rough spot on chapters dealing with cyberspace and Alphaworld. I have no interest whatsoever to read about Internet interactive psuedo worlds.

2 chapters are wasted on this...I skipped them completely.

(Chapters 4 & 5).

By chapter six, Ms Benjamins' back in her rowboat and gets her prose rythm back on track. Discussions on the Pioneer 10 and 11 are held -

as well as discussions on SETI. All are pretty interesting, but her best writing is evidenced in chapters 1,2 and 3.

I found this book on sale and I must say, it was food for thought -- I enjoyed the first 3 chapters very intensely.

Her writing in most of the first three chapters can be described as brilliance in the face of the sun. I do recommend this book for all those persons who wish to upgrade their use of the English language, and range of topics to discuss while in the company of intelligent persons.
Kakashkaliandiia
The author ruminates on the scarred spaceflight culture that Apollo created and the later space program destroyed. She visits Roswell, New Mexico, with its alien kitsch, and the Kennedy Space Center and Cocoa Beach, Florida, with its gigantic rocket assembly buildings and launch complexes and reminders of the heyday of Apollo, when humans went to the Moon. Now, more than half of the world's population has been born since the last Apollo mission to the Moon in December 1972, and those exciting events seem much less real than previously. She also explores the frontiers of cyperspace, suggesting that this may become the final frontier instead of the Moon and Mars and other places in the universe.