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eBook Wild Honey: More Stories from an African Wildlife Sanctuary download

by Bookey Peek

eBook Wild Honey: More Stories from an African Wildlife Sanctuary download ISBN: 1906251207
Author: Bookey Peek
Publisher: Max Press (March 2, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1829 kb
Fb2: 1361 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf docx lrf doc
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Agricultural Sciences

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Wild Honey: More Stories from an African Wildlife Sanctuary and manage a slice of heaven and hell all rolled into on. .

Wild Honey: More Stories from an African Wildlife Sanctuary. Bookey Peek and manage a slice of heaven and hell all rolled into on.All the Way Home" is a lovely book - just a whole heap of tales from Stone Hills, Zimbabwe pulled together by the recollections of the author and thoroughly immerses one in the sights, sounds and smell of her land

In that sense, Wild Honey is equally the story of the warthog and the honey beaver that are adopted by Peek, and .

In that sense, Wild Honey is equally the story of the warthog and the honey beaver that are adopted by Peek, and who in turn adopt her, into that wider family of life on earth. Highly recommended, but start with 'All the Way Home' to really appreciate this. With a touching mixture of humour and pathos, Bookey picks up again the story of Poombi, the warthog who featured so strongly in 'All the Way Home', and introduces us to Badge, the utterly charming honey badger who took over her home and family.

Select Format: Paperback. More Stories from an African Wildlife Sactuary. ISBN13:9781906251208. Release Date:March 2009.

I put up a post on the Stone Hills Wildlife Sanctuary page promising to write a new blog when and if we ever get rain

Mali was rescued by Richard and Bookey Peek from Malilangwe, found roaming alone, underweight dehydrated and completely disorientated, we will never know what exactly happened to her mother. I put up a post on the Stone Hills Wildlife Sanctuary page promising to write a new blog when and if we ever get rain. Animals are suffering and dying daily on Stone Hills, as they are all over the country, and a serious drought is predicted.

Bookey Peek's sequel to her captivating book All the Way Home takes us back to Stone Hills Wildlife Sanctuary, where comedy, tragedy and the antics of 'the meanest animal in the world' make every day an experience

Bookey Peek's sequel to her captivating book All the Way Home takes us back to Stone Hills Wildlife Sanctuary, where comedy, tragedy and the antics of 'the meanest animal in the world' make every day an experience. The story evolves as we follow Bookey's vain attempts to discipline and house-train Badge, an animal with a mind of its own. It is a tale of hilarity, charm and poignancy set against the menacing fear of land grabs, election intimidation and problems of daily living in Zimbabwe.

Following on from the highly acclaimed All the Way Home, here is a brand new volume of unforgettable adventures from Richard and Bookey Peek's wildlife sanctuary amongst Zimbabwe's ancient Matobo Hills. Packed with anecdote and adventure, Wild Honey leads us back to the Stone Hills sanctuary, where comedy, tragedy and the extraordinary antics of the most misunderstood animal in the world make every day unforgettable. In these troubled times Stone Hills has become more than a sanctuary

Learn more about the Honey badger - with amazing Honey badger photos and facts on Arkive. Here, in our first extract from her touching new book, Wild Honey: More Stories From An African Wildlife Sanctuary, Bookey explains how none.

Learn more about the Honey badger - with amazing Honey badger photos and facts on Arkive. WARNING: do not look a honey badger in the eyes or he will turn your ass to stone. He looked like a helpless bundle of fur, but this orphaned honey badger cub could turn into a growling, fight-picking menace – as the besotted couple who rescued him soon discovered.

Find this Pin and more on Moholoholo Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre by African Conservation Experience. Here, in our first extract from her touching new book, Wild Honey: More Stories From An African Wildlife Sanctuary, Bookey explains how none

Find this Pin and more on Moholoholo Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre by African Conservation Experience. Libraries near you: WorldCat.

More Stories from an African Wildlife Sactuary.
Comments: (4)
Perilanim
This is a laugh out loud,beginning to end read.For every reader who loves the African scene,this book is for you.
The Rollers of Vildar
As a lover of animals I am constantly being amazed by their intelligence and perception. Dogs that surf and save lives, parrots that talk and count, hyenas and wolves that allow you to temporarily join the pack without ripping your leg off, orangutangs and gorillas that trust us with their babies. When I hear someone mention such denigrating terms such as `dumb animal' or `they are worse than animals' when making the comparison to a gang of rapists or murderers, I wonder if they realise just how inappropriate the analogy is. Animals, generally, are good people, even the notoriously grumpy African honey badger, who thinks nothing of chasing a buffalo away from a waterhole, and if you, as a human, try to intervene in the foraging quests of a badger in the wilds, you need to be a much better tree climber than he is. But what really astonishes me is the emotional side of animals. Other than imprinting, they are capable of forming the most loyal and bizarre relationships. When Bookey and Richard Peek took on the surrogate role of parents for the orphaned warthog, Poombi and the Badger, they were probably fully aware of just how big an emotional burden they were also taking on. You can't raise animals without falling in love with them, and wild animals have a tenuous lifespan. It is worse when the animals return your love and trust, when they have learned to rely on you for their wellbeing, when they bring their young to you for approval because you are accepted as part of the family, and the heartbreak you must surely feel when disaster befalls them. It is hard then to think of them simply as wild animals. Then they are family members that you let down and feel guilty about. That is the downside of running a wildlife sanctuary, especially in the uncertain political climate of Zimbabwe, but just as in life itself, there is always an upside to make it worthwhile, and in these stories from an African wildlife sanctuary you will see that upside in abundance, see the love, care and the humour that the peaks and their dedicated African staff enjoy in the magnificent stretch of bush known as stone hills. I can't help but feel envious. You will love this book.

Jerold Richert - author of The Flamingo Room
Lost Python
I had no knowledge of Bookey Peek as an author, or the wonderful characters of Stone Hills, until I was lucky enough to catch 10 minutes of her husband Richard's documentary Honey Badger: Raising Hell. And for those 10 minutes, I was absolutely mesmerized by the cutest little fellow - purportedly the meanest animal in the world - an African honey badger called Badge. Having missed most of the movie I went on an internet hunt to find a copy, as I couldn't get Badge and his unfinished story out of my mind. During my search for the DVD, I found reference to Bookey and her two biographies - All the Way Home and Wild Honey - which are collections of stories from the wildlife sanctuary she runs with her husband. I ordered them online instantly. And I'm very glad I did.

I have so thoroughly enjoyed both books - I didn't want them to end. Bookey has such a wonderful way with words, and totally drew me into the incredible life she leads at Stone Hills Wildlife Sanctuary in Zimbabwe. I fell in love with the land, its history, its rugged beauty, and of course, the animals Bookey is so privileged to share her life with.

In Wild Honey, along comes Badge to keep Bookey and her family busy. And my goodness, what a handful he turns out to be. But he quickly charms his way into their hearts. Before long, I too found myself besotted by the orphaned baby badger. Even his noxious anal secretions seemed endearing thanks to Bookey's skillful prose, which resonated with her own love and delight in the tiny cub.

Bookey's evocative style had me laughing out loud at times, and nearly in tears at others. I experienced a whole range of emotions reading Wild Honey. There was worry on occasion - like the day Badge decided to have a nap in a comfy nook nextdoor to a leopard's hideout. Fascination, as he discovered more and more about his place in the world. And wonder at the amazing relationship Bookey and her family had with the meanest animal on earth.

I revelled in my reading forays to Africa, escaping to the sanctuary as soon as I re-opened the book each night. Bookey's fabulous literary imagery is superbly complemented by Richard's outstanding artwork and photographs appearing throughout the text, so it's not hard to imagine you are right there at Stone Hills with them. Alas, with the pages turning effortlessly, I finished Wild Honey all too quickly. I am now eagerly awaiting Bookey's next collection of even more stories from her African wildlife sanctuary.

Highly recommended reading.
Kulalas
I was enthused to read this book after seeing the documentary made on raising "Badger" the Honey Badger. Assuming that Wild Honey was mostly about this part of their lives (due to the blurb and the front cover as well as implied in the documentary) I was surprised to find that not one word of the honey badger is mentioned until Chapter 15, over half way through.
In reading the book, the latter aside, I thought it would still be an enjoyable read but Bookey's coochy-coo writing style was painful to read. As someone involved in conservation myself, her views on wildlife were just as painful in some aspects. It may however be alright for soemone who has only ever dreamed of the African Bush... (I actually find it very odd she has managed to write in this style even though she goes into details about being pushed off the property at one point due to the risks of staying in the beginings of the troubles in Zimbabwe.)

The most painful thing though, she manages to insult both South Africans and Australians in one paragraph. I don't think she realises these are probably two of her biggest markets.

I would not recommend this book, however if you wish to only have a dreamy view of the bush and hand-raising animals, maybe you will enjoy it.