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eBook Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings download

by Donald P. Morgan

eBook Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings download ISBN: 0160210313
Author: Donald P. Morgan
Publisher: United States Govt Printing Office; 4 edition (June 1, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 207
ePub: 1790 kb
Fb2: 1228 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf lrf rtf azw
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Agricultural Sciences

Donald P. Morgan1989年6月1日.

Donald P. Included is information on the health hazards of pesticides currently in use, along with current consensus recommendations for management of poisonings and injuries caused by them. Formatted for quick reference by through indexing, the book addresses poisoning by insecticides, pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, rodenticides, fumigants, and other solvents, acaricides, repellents, and adjuvants. Indexed by symptoms and signs and by chemical and product names.

Recognition and management of pesticide poisoning. The most common sources of pesticide poisonings, signs and symptoms, and specifics of management are addressed in Table . –5. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, . TABLE 2. Most Common Pesticide Poisonings: Recognition and Management. Mechanism of action/toxicity.

Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings (6th e. Washington, DC: Office of Pesticide Programs, . Environmental Protection Agency. Percutaneous penetration of some pesticides and herbicides in man".

Recognition of Poisoning. Sometimes pesticide poisoning is obvious. of Recognition and Management of Pesticide. The patient is brought in with a container of. pesticide, the pesticide residue is still in the. patient’s mouth, and the patient has symp-. toms that are characteristic of the labeled pes-. 2. Additional Interventions. While skin and gastrointestinal decontami-. nation are progressing, investigation into the. background of the exposure should be ongo

ed. of: Recognition and management of pesticide poisonings, Donald P. Morgan.

ed. 4th ed. Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Medical University of South Carolina

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Medical University of South Carolina. The updated manual is authored by James R. Roberts, . H, and J. Routt Reigart, . of the Medical University of South Carolina.

The Office of Pesticide Programs of the . Environmental Protection Agency has sponsored the series since 1973. There is general agreement that prevention of pesticide poisoning remains a much surer path to safety and health than reliance on treatment. Most indoor uses of organophosphates have been eliminated, and a combination of EPA risk mitigation actions has limited their use on food crops. In addition to the inherent toxicity of pesticides, none of the medical procedures or drugs used in treating poisonings is risk free.

Most poisonings from pesticides do not have a specific antidote, making decontamination the most important intervention. For maximal benefit to the patient, skin, eye, and gastric decontamination should be undertaken while specifics of the poisoning are being determined. As in most illnesses and injuries, the history of the poisoning is of great importance and will determine specific needs for decontamination and therapy, if any exist. Protection of health care workers during the decontamination process is important and frequently overlooked.

Organophosphate poisoning is poisoning due to organophosphates (OPs). Organophosphates are used as insecticides, medications, and nerve agents. Symptoms include increased saliva and tear production, diarrhea, vomiting, small pupils, sweating, muscle. Symptoms include increased saliva and tear production, diarrhea, vomiting, small pupils, sweating, muscle tremors, and confusion. While onset of symptoms is often within minutes to hours, some symptoms can take weeks to appear. Symptoms can last for days to weeks.