carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » The Conquest of New Spain (Penguin Classics)

eBook The Conquest of New Spain (Penguin Classics) download

by Bernal Diaz Del Castillo,John M. Cohen

eBook The Conquest of New Spain (Penguin Classics) download ISBN: 0140441239
Author: Bernal Diaz Del Castillo,John M. Cohen
Publisher: Penguin Books (August 30, 1963)
Language: English
Pages: 412
ePub: 1851 kb
Fb2: 1158 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: azw lit rtf lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: World Literature

Spanish historian Bernal Diaz del Castillo (. 492-1584) was a soldier in the .

Bernal Díaz del Castillo (c. 1496 – January 11, 1584) was a Spanish conquistador, who participated as a soldier in the conquest of Mexico under.

Bernal Díaz del Castillo, himself a soldier under Cortes . People Who Read The Conquest of New Spain Also Read.

Captain Bernal Diaz del Castillo. The Conquest of New Spain. (6th printing (1973) e.

Bernal Díaz del Castillo, himself a soldier under Cortes, presents a fascinatingly detailed description of the Spanish landing in Mexico in 1520 and their amazement at the city, the exploitation of the natives for gold. Bernal Diaz del Castillo.

Bernal Díaz del Castillo, himself a soldier under Cortes, presents a fascinatingly detailed description of the Spanish landing in Mexico in 1520 and their.

Spanish historian Bernal Diaz del Castillo (.

Bernal Diaz del Castillo. All Documents from The Conquest of New Spain (Penguin Classics).

Vivid, powerful and absorbing, this is a first-person account of one of the most startling military episodes in history: the overthrow of Montezuma's doomed Aztec Empire by the ruthless Hernan Cortes and his band of adventurers. Bernal Díaz del Castillo, himself a soldier under Cortes, presents a fascinatingly detailed description of the Spanish landing in Mexico in 1520 and their amazement at the city, the exploitation of the natives for gold and other treasures, the expulsion and flight of the Spaniards, their regrouping and eventual capture of the Aztec capital.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
Comments: (7)
Munimand
I read this book in a little over a day for a Pre-Columbian History class at university.

Bernald Diaz was a foot soldier for Cortez. He wrote this memoir at the end of his life. But the unabridged text has details that are so specific (Diaz describes Cortezes saddle in great detail. He also describes the weeping sores of gonnorhea on the men as they climb the great Aztec temple to meet Montezuma!!.) that I dont find it impossible he can remember the really important details.

This is in fact a favortite book of mine. I have lent it out so many times I always just buy a new one (the rarest of books is the one that is returned!).

The story of Cortez's conquest and destruction of the Aztec empire amd the beginning of Spain's domination of the indiginous peoples for centuries to come. But HOW Cortez conquered the Aztecs and surrounding tribes is amazing.

Also, the Aztec myth regarding their destruction by the returning, malevolent god; Queztecoutal is hair raising. The Aztec's believed that in the year that Cortez landed, Coutzequatl (Im sure I spell that wrong. The god is pictured as a winged serpent and is the supreme god of the Aztec's as it brings about the end of Aztec rule) will return in anger and wrath to destroy all the Aztecs and reclaim the city of Tenochtilan, capital city of the Aztec empire.
And Coutzequatl will return as a WHITE MAN FROM THE EAST!.

And who shows up exactly per the calander's religious predictions?: CORTEZ.

The whole story is amazing and so very very sad. Diaz describes the Aztec city as rivaling anything in Europe. In fact, he states that the beauty and sophistication of design is beyond anything he's seen in Europe.

And it was utterly destroyed.

The book to read along with this one is "THE HUMMINGBIRD AND THE HAWK". It details the history of the Aztec's fall with a significant amount of embellishment and fantasy added for effect no doubt.

But the story is 100% real: men who seek god and gold (and not in that order) destory a civilization; it's culture, history and people but for those they put to work as slaves.

It's an unbelievable story. But it really did occur.
FRAY
Almost 500 years after it was written, The Conquest of New Spain is a compelling read, providing a first person account of Corte's invasion of Mexico. the characters on both sides of the conflict are vividly portrayed. Ranks up there among the great historical accounts of the New World that captures the clash of cultures that resulted in the Spanish conquest of Mexico. Of especial interest was the development of alliances between the Spanish and various indigenous groups who were opposed to the Aztecs. The diplomatic negotiations with the Aztecs are intricately described. The translation is excellent!
Nikok
This is a book only a Spaniard could write. It reads as if it were written by Inigo Montoya with its exaltations of the valor of both the Conquistadors, who (to paraphrase) for years hence would sleep in their armor because they knew no other life than that of a soldier, and the Aztecs, who (also paraphrasing) fought like a thousand Hectors in defense of Tenochtitlan. This book may take place in our world, but you will have trouble believing that because it is not our world as we know it. Nothing has ever transported me to another time and place so completely as The Conquest of New Spain -- and I’ve ridden in Doc Brown’s Delorean. If you have ever read another historical account that had the same effect, then, dear reader, you MUST tell me about it.
Minnai
I loved, loved, loved this eye-witness account of Cortez's conquest of Mexico, but I had to buy another book to get this whole story. This is only the first half of Bernal Diaz Del Castillo's amazing memoirs. Get "The Memoirs of the Conquistador Bernal Díaz del Castillo (Halcyon Classics)" instead and save yourself the trouble of having to pay for another book to see how thing end.
Hanad
Sometimes extraordinary events are fortuitously recorded by a well placed participant. In this case, Bernal Diaz del Castillo, describes the 16th century Spanish discovery and defeat of the Mexican empire in an account that is so compelling that it is difficult to put down.
The basic facts are not disputed, and reveal the extraordinary military valour of Cortez and most of his men. He gives weight to existing tribal conflicts, the role of religious beliefs and also illustrates Cortez's manipulative cunning and great love of love of gold, even going as far as cheating his own men.