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eBook Desire and Duty: A Sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice download

by Haller/Buchanan Studio,Ted and Marilyn Bader

eBook Desire and Duty: A Sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice download ISBN: 0965429903
Author: Haller/Buchanan Studio,Ted and Marilyn Bader
Publisher: Revive; 1st edition (July 1, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 285
ePub: 1255 kb
Fb2: 1459 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mobi rtf lit txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: United States

This was not the greatest sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice that I've read. This book in no way reflects Jane Austen's characters in Pride and Prejudice

This was not the greatest sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice that I've read. I enjoyed that this story delved into more about Georgiana, but was a bit annoyed with the way Elizabeth and Darcy were portrayed. Most of Elizabeth's wit and outspoken thoughts and words were missing, and Darcy's pleasant mien was a little hard to believe. This book in no way reflects Jane Austen's characters in Pride and Prejudice. The characters in Desire and Duty (where did they get the title, it does not follow with the book at all!) are insipid, weak, immature, dull, unappealing, uncommitted and totally out of character of the original characters.

Ted and Marilyn Bader. The Baders, Ted and Marilyn, bring to Desire and Duty an intimate knowledge of the society that made Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy, Wickham and his Lydia, and even Lady Catherine and her Mr. Collins, possible. No rent sunders that fabric as the Baders’ extended narrative brings us again into the presence of Jane Austen’s glorious troupe of Georgian performers. Unlike Dickens they do not make their villain too steep, their heroine irresponsible, their hero moonstruck.

Desire and Duty book. Desire and Duty is Ted and Marilyn Bader's sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. Jane Austen s story ends with Elizabeth s marriage and the Baders continue her story as wife, mother, and confidante to her sister-in-law, Georgiana. Set in the years 1805-1816, Desire and Duty tells the romantic adventures of Many critics feel the lively heroine of Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth Bennet Darcy, is the best characterized female in all of English literature.

Desire and Duty is Ted and Marilyn Bader's sequel to Jane Austen's . I really enjoyed reading this particular sequel to "Pride and Prejudice". This is one of many sequels to Pride and Prejudice written by amateur writers

Desire and Duty is Ted and Marilyn Bader's sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. The story takes place between 1805-1816 and, to my suprise, focused on Mr. Darcy's sister Georgiana and her struggles between desire and duty. The authors followed Jane Austins ideas she left for the continuation of P&P. This is one of many sequels to Pride and Prejudice written by amateur writers. It was mediocre, but still kind of interesting to see how others see Elizabeth and Darcy's future.

I don't venture too much into sequels into Jane Austen's novels because 1) I was burned by one really, really . As such, the many beloved characters of Pride and Prejudice are mostly relegated to the sideline, if included at all.

Ted Bader and Marilyn Bader, Desire & Duty: A Sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (Revive, 1997). Go to authors' web page). Julia Barrett, Presumption: An Entertainment (M. Evans, 1993).

Chapter five of the Jane Austen novel Pride and Prejudice. Chapter 5. Within a short walk of Longbourn lived a family with whom the Bennets were particularly intimate. Sir William Lucas had been formerly in trade in Meryton, where he had made a tolerable fortune, and risen to the honour of knighthood by an address to the King, during his mayoralty. The distinction had perhaps been felt too strongly.

Jane Austen did not write a sequel but many have been written by. .Desire and Duty (Ted and Marilyn Bader). Mr. Darcy Takes a Wife (Linda Berdoll). Darcy & Elizabeth (Linda Berdoll)

Jane Austen did not write a sequel but many have been written by numerous fans of her work. The last time I finished reading the novel, I decided to read all the "sequels" I could find to see how many different ways her fans have imagined "happily ever after. Some are good, some are horrible. Unofficial Pride and Prejudice sequels: Mr Darcy's Daughters (Elizabeth Aston). The Exploits and Adventures of Miss Alethea Darcy (Elizabeth Aston). The True Darcy Spirit (Elizabeth Aston). Darcy & Elizabeth (Linda Berdoll). Pemberley, or, Pride and Prejudice Continued (Emma Tennant).

Many critics feel the lively heroine of Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth Bennet Darcy, is the best characterized female in all of English literature. Jane Austen s story ends with Elizabeth s marriage and the Baders continue her story as wife, mother, and confidante to her sister-in-law, Georgiana. Set in the years 1805-1816, Desire and Duty tells the romantic adventures of Mr. Darcy s beautiful, shy, devout younger sister, Georgiana. After her narrow escape (in Pride and Prejudice) from the nefarious clutches of Mr. Wickham, Georgiana is very cautious about men. Her childhood friend and poor gentleman neighbor, Mr. Thomas Staley, returns from the battle of Waterloo to become a tutor for the Darcy children. He is fascinating to her, but he is ashamed of his poverty. When Georgiana realizes her feelings for Thomas are more than friendship, she has to fight her own extreme shyness as well as the machinations of her imposing and powerful aunt, Lady Catherine, who wishes to see Georgiana married to the Duke of Kent, who will inherit Catherine s estate. Along the way, issues of duty and desire, in marriage and in one s relationship to God, are presented. Surprises in the plot rivet the attention of the reader until the very end. Desire and Duty is unique among sequels to Pride and Prejudice since it is the only one which follows the ideas Jane Austen left for the continuation of her famous book.
Comments: (7)
riki
This was not the greatest sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice that I've read. I enjoyed that this story delved into more about Georgiana, but was a bit annoyed with the way Elizabeth and Darcy were portrayed. Most of Elizabeth's wit and outspoken thoughts and words were missing, and Darcy's pleasant mien was a little hard to believe. So unbelievable, I half expected to see Wickham invited to Pemberley. The fact that Elizabeth and Darcy didn't think when they were called Kent by Lady Catherine and all the "weird happenings" after the visit didn't set them off enough to act against the accusations laid at there feet about Thomas. Frustrated that actual story covered 42% of the book, while the other 58% were Historical Notes. While these were nicely arranged by chapters, and research obviously done by the authors, more story would have been appreciated. I hope the follow-up book to this book is better.
Uscavel
As I posted on Goodreads: This is a P&P sequel that is focused on Georgiana and the nearly star-crossed love she has with her neighbour Thomas. I found it a bit dry, especially compare to other sequels. Part of that may be because I'm not a big fan of Georgiana focused sequels.

There's a bit of religious moralizing in the story, as well, which reminds me of "Conviction" another Georgiana sequel. If you liked that story then you should like this one as well. I didn't find that the religious component fit as well as it does in Maria Grace's works.
Vushura
Desire and Duty: A Sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Even though I sampled this book before accidentally purchasing ( I meant to borrow from Kindle library), I wasn't prepared for the direction the story took. It did not conform to Regency etiquette, behavior or speech.Instead, it quickly devolved into a thinly veiling Methodist sermon. Since I am not of that faith, I did not appreciate being "ambushed" but the authors. I assume some readers might be interested in this type of story so I am very disappointed that the authors were not more forthright in presently their point of view from the beginning. I will not be completing the remaining 75% of this book and have returned it for a refund. Jane Austen fans beware! This book is not what it seems. I considered it a waste of my time and money.
Quinthy
I have to totally agree with all the extremely bad feedback that this book has received. It only goes to show you that ANYONE can write a book, but to my astonishment, how does it get published? I have a feeling the writers paid for the publishing themselves! This book was so very badly written that I absolutely could never have believed that I was reading a Pride and Prejudice Sequel. Mr. Ted Bader would do better to stick to his medical practice and write, what I can only assume to be extremely dreary medical manuscripts. Mrs. Marilyn Bader should stick to jarring preserves!

This book in no way reflects Jane Austen's characters in Pride and Prejudice. The characters in Desire and Duty (where did they get the title, it does not follow with the book at all!) are insipid, weak, immature, dull, unappealing, uncommitted and totally out of character of the original characters. I felt that I was reading a 1st Grade Jane and Dick story, which I found written much better than this book!

At the end of the book the authors say that they are going to write a sequel to this sequel!!!!! This is mind-numbing! Please do not take advantage of Jane Austen's patrons and put upon them another of your childish pranks. P.S. For heaven's sake get rid of the picture in the back of the book, it only reminds me of Mr. & Mrs. Collins of Pride and Prejudice (maybe it is!)
Valawye
Ick! I've bought every P&P sequel I could get my hands on, and this is the flattest and lamest of them all. Preachy, shallow, cardboard characters inhabit a drab world written for a second-grader. Drearily heavy emphasis on religion and morality with leaden dialogue leaves the characters as stick figures moving through stilted lines. The first couple of chapters are not so bad when viewed as window-dressing to Austen's masterpiece, but the authors should have ended the book there. It gets steadily worse and worse, to the point of being downright unreadable by the mid-way point. If you buy it, good luck getting through it.
Instead, I'd highly recommend "Letters from Pemberley," or "The Diary of Henry Fitzwilliam Darcy," both of which are quick reads, but very sweet, satisfying, and well-done. I also enjoyed "Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman," which was a bit Harlequin Romance-ish, but still very entertaining.
Yla
The entire text of this book appears twice in this e book version. Is this really necessary??? I don't think so!!! I did enjoy the story though I only read it once and skipped the repeat in the second half of the book!
Xlisiahal
It seems the various reviews are divided into mostly two opinions, "I loved it" or "I hated it". I fall into the first category, I found Desire and Duty a very satisfactory read. It was fast, I finished it in one sitting, but this is not too unusual for me, I frequently stay up late reading. I was entertained by D&D. If you like Emma Tennet's books or Pamela Aiden's lovely Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman trilogy, I believe you wil enjoy Desire & Duty, this book is sweet and shows the characters I loved in P&P as close as any of the many sequels I have read.
Some novels try to mimic the same writing style as Austen, and some novels try to remain true to her plot or characters. This book does neither. The writing is "hokey" - I'm sorry I can't come up with a better word for it! While the authors go to great length to explain how they were true to the language of Jane Austen, they miss the mark entirely. Then you have the characters - while the names and places were the same (Mr. Darcy, Lizzy, Pemberley, etc.) there was very little likeness in how they were portrayed, not to mention a see-through plot. If you go into this book with the expectation that it is a stand alone historical romance, then you might not be let down by the final result, but if you are looking for a good follow-up to Janes Austen then don't bother, there are much better books out there!