carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Here, There Everywhere

eBook Here, There Everywhere download

by Chris Roberson

eBook Here, There  Everywhere download ISBN: 1591023319
Author: Chris Roberson
Publisher: Pyr (April 30, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 283
ePub: 1934 kb
Fb2: 1976 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf lrf lit txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: United States

Chris Roberson is part of a certain cabal of science fiction authors that allegedly haunt Central Texas, plotting all .

Chris Roberson is part of a certain cabal of science fiction authors that allegedly haunt Central Texas, plotting all manner of mischief and nefarious deeds, or so I am told. Here, There & Everywhere" is episodic in nature and doesn't necessarily break any new ground in the time travel genre, but I'm a fan of cross-pollination with historical figures and other literary characters, and so I give it higher marks than I might otherwise. Also, the cover art by John Picacio is great.

Here, There, and Everywhere book. Chris Roberson has written a fun book about a woman via a bracelet called Sofia who can travel through time and space and divergent time lines as well. Even though he keeps up with current theories of time travel he doesn't forget that the best science fiction isn't about the science but the people. It is the one I like to re-read when ever I get the chance.

Chris Roberson's short fiction has appeared in the anthologies Live Without a Net (Roc, 2003), The Many Faces of Van Helsing (Ace, 2004), and FutureShocks (Roc, 2005), with previous and forthcoming appearances in the pages of Asimov's Science Fiction, Black October, Fantastic Metropolis, RevolutionSF, Twilight Tales, Opi8, Alien Skin, Electric Velocipede, and.

Here, there & everywhere. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Women travelers - Fiction. Time travel - Fiction. t on November 30, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Here, There and Everywhere" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles from their 1966 album Revolver. McCartney includes it among his personal favourites of all the songs he has written. In 2000, Mojo ranked it 4th in the magazine's list of the greatest songs of all time.

When Roxanne Bonaventure is eleven years old, a dying woman gives her a gift that changes her life utterly, making her a singular creature, with no analogue or equivalent

When Roxanne Bonaventure is eleven years old, a dying woman gives her a gift that changes her life utterly, making her a singular creature, with no analogue or equivalent. With the strange device called the "Sofia," she is granted the ability to travel anywhere in space and time, not only through times that were and will be, but also through the worlds that could have been and might someday be.

Here, an old lady, wounded and evidently dying, appears in a flash of light; she gives Roxanne a bracelet, the . There’s little or no originality to Roberson’s scattershot storytelling, and seemingly the future bores him-none of Roxanne’s trips there hold any lingering interest.

Here, an old lady, wounded and evidently dying, appears in a flash of light; she gives Roxanne a bracelet, the Sofia, which, Roxanne will discover, can open doors to past and future, indeed, alternate pasts and futures. Later, she explores the Beatles’ career-all of them, including the one where Pete Best remained their drummer. Overall: exotic and ephemeral, like lychee-flavored bubblegum. Pub Date: April 1st, 2005.

AbeBooks For more on Chris Roberson visit ww. hrisroberson.

For more on Chris Roberson visit ww. From School Library Journal: Adult/High School–Roxanne Bonaventure, a precocious 11-year-old, leaves school one day to find a woman sprawled on the sidewalk.

When Roxanne Bonaventure is eleven years old, a dying woman gives her a gift that changes her life utterly, making her a singular creature, with no analogue or equivalent. With the strange device called the "Sofia," she is granted the ability to travel anywhere in space and time, not only through times that were and will be, but also through the worlds that could have been and might someday be. From that day forward, no place or time can contain her, no danger can assail her, no mystery can elude her. From the deepest secrets of the past to the furthest flung visions of the future, Roxanne's life knows no boundaries except those she can imagine. But such power comes at a price: the life she might have led is forever lost to her, twisting away among the infinite threads of the Myriad. Roxanne finds herself isolated, unable to make lasting, meaningful relationships with friends, family, or strangers. Here, There & Everywhere is the story of one woman searching for herself, and for someone with whom to share her life. It is one story, and many stories - the jigsaw puzzle of a life, from youth to old age, projected against the backdrop of everything that ever was, might have been, and may yet be. Roxanne's adventures take her from Victorian England to Ancient Egypt, from the End of Time to the birth of The Beatles. Along the way, she encounters every method of time travel theoretically possible: Visser Wormholes and Tipler Cylinders; a mysterious substance called chronium; and the slow and steady path we all take, moving forward one day at a time. And somewhere in the endlessly splitting paths of the Myriad lies the secret of Roxann
Comments: (7)
Kann
An interesting and somewhat engaging book that was unsatisfying. A young girl is given a mysterious bracelet by an old woman who vanishes immediately. She learns that she can use the bracelet to travel to other times and other timelines as multiple universes are created by the decisions people make. She spends her life traveling throughout time and space but not having anyone with whom she can share her life. In the afterward the author explains that the first and last chapters were written at a writers’ workshop. Then about half the intervening chapters were created to make a novella. Then, in order to create a full-blown novel, the other chapters were written. That’s how the book reads, almost like a collection of short stories about the same main character. Many chapters come out of nowhere and don’t really lay the groundwork for what comes next. Perhaps this was intentional as this is what the woman’s life is like. I was disappointed and not inclined to read more by this author.
Clonanau
The concept here isn't particularly new, as the author acknowledges with references to both "By His Bootstraps" and "The Man Who Folded Himself." But Roberson manages to find something rather new to say. Not only does he knock most time-travel SF into a cocked hat, by way of modern physics, but his take on the nature of time and the universe is particularly satisfying.

Roxanne Bonaventure is unique in the cosmos, the sole possessor of a 5-dimensional magic bracelet that allows her to move as she will in space, time and probability. The story follows her from the age of 11, when she is granted this "blessing", through the long years of her life. In the vignettes that comprise the novel, we see her learn and change, observing humanity in all its choices, until she finally finds out that what she really wants is the one thing she cannot have.

But sometimes you get what you need.
Inertedub
I loved this book. Thought this was the best Sci-Fi novel I have ever read about time travel. The book throughout is excellent and the very ending puts it completely over the top wrapping up everything in the book. I will warn you that most other people I've recommended this book liked it a lot but didn't love it as much as I did-not sure why. May have been because the main character is female or they just weren't impressed with how the time traveling was handled. But again, as far as time traveling, best Sci-Fi novel I have ever read.
Tetaian
It's just what I was looking for . Very pleased. Shipped very quickly. It's a great book, definitely recommend it to others. Thank you!
Fiarynara
I haven't been blown away by this book. In fact, I am halfway through right now and put it down to read another book. I'll probably come back and finish it, but it feels a little "children's bookish" to me and hasn't been really unusual or compelling.

One of the many traps that time-travel books can fall into is the "infinite universes" trap where every possible action a person makes creates a new universe to accomodate that new timestream. Eventually, this takes all meaning out of any action that the character makes because it doesn't matter what action you take if you have taken every other possible action in a parallel universe. And it becomes tedious and boring.

I prefer books that dwell more on the story and the person, rather than the philosophy of time travel and its paradoxes and ways around them.

This seems like an amateurish effort. It isn't terrible, it just isn't compelling.
Ishnjurus
Chris Roberson is part of a certain cabal of science fiction authors that allegedly haunt Central Texas, plotting all manner of mischief and nefarious deeds, or so I am told. I mean, Austin's a comparatively small town, and I'm regularly running into the likes of Kinky Friedman, Ernest Hemingway, and Honore de Balzac, and don't think I haven't resorted to fisticuffs to settle certain sensitive affairs, but I'm pretty certain that I've never encounterd Mr. Roberson and his ilk. But I digress.

This present volume is a repackaging of, and expansion upon, "Any Time At All", the previous collection of the escapades of Roxanne Bonaventure, whose tales have been under development for several years. As a young girl, Roxanne comes into possession of a strange bracelet that allows her to travel through time and space, giving her access to all types of variant Earths both past and future, although she soon discovers that she can never change her native timeline's past. (As with most time travel fiction, considering the physics and implications and rules of rattling across time/space is headache-inducing here, so best not to think too deeply upon the mechanics, although there is one particular precept here that is critical to the novel's primary plot point.)

Naturally, she embarks upon amusing escapades throughout history, including a mandatory brush with the Nazis, because if you can go to the past, battling these evildoers is pretty much de rigeur. She also pops back to Victorian London to assist one Sandford Blank (a fictional melange of Sherlock Holmes and Sexton Blake), a character who will be featured on his own in one of the prolific Mr. Roberson's forthcoming novels.

It should be noted that the author credits several influences, among them Philip Jose Farmer's Wold Newton Universe (a postulation that many of the Victorian and Pulp Era heroes are all related), in emulation of which Mr. Roberson has created a whole clan of Bonaventures who've had rollicking adventures of their own in separate novels. He also gives a nod to Jess Nevins' comprehensive if daunting "Encylopedia of Fantastic Victoriana", which is definitely worth picking up for fans of that genre, or followers of Alan Moore's League of Extraordinary Gentleman.

I also feel compelled to mention that Mr. Roberson is the grand poobah of MonkeyBrain Books, a genre publisher with some excellent titles.

"Here, There & Everywhere" is episodic in nature and doesn't necessarily break any new ground in the time travel genre, but I'm a fan of cross-pollination with historical figures and other literary characters, and so I give it higher marks than I might otherwise. Also, the cover art by John Picacio is great. (He has done most, if not all, of the covers for the works of the aforementioned cabal of authors.)

Oh, fans of Doctor Who will probably find an extra dimension in this novel.