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eBook The Dead Father (Audible Modern Vanguard) download

by Dennis Holland,Donald Barthelme

eBook The Dead Father (Audible Modern Vanguard) download ISBN: 1423395743
Author: Dennis Holland,Donald Barthelme
Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Library edition (February 15, 2010)
Language: English
ePub: 1530 kb
Fb2: 1472 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf lrf azw lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: United States

Donald Barthelme (Author), Dennis Holland (Narrator), Audible Studios . The Dead Father" is a novel by Barthelme who is far more famous for his short stories

Donald Barthelme (Author), Dennis Holland (Narrator), Audible Studios (Publisher) & 0 more. His use of Post Modern conventions is genuinely unique and he wields a story of just enough depth to keep the reader guessing where it might take him next, but always comfortable in the passenger seat of Barthelme's vehicle. The book takes the reader on a journey wherein a god is disposed of, simply that. The Dead Father" is a novel by Barthelme who is far more famous for his short stories. But fans of his short stories won't be surprised by anything in The Dead Father.

Written by Donald Barthelme, Audiobook narrated by Dennis Holland. With these audacious and murderously witty stories, Donald Barthelme threw the preoccupations of our time into the literary equivalent of a Cuisinart and served up a gorgeous salad of American culture, high and low. Here are the urban upheavals reimagined as frontier myth; travelogues through countries that might have been created by Kafka; cryptic dialogues that bore down to the bedrock of our longings, dreams, and angsts.

The Dead Father (Paperback). Published May 6th 1986 by Penguin Books. The Dead Father (Audible Audio). Published August 12th 2009 by Audible Modern Vanguard. Author(s): Donald Barthelme, Dennis Holland. ISBN: 1423395751 (ISBN13: 9781423395751). Paperback, 192 pages. Author(s): Donald Barthelme. ISBN: 0140086676 (ISBN13: 9780140086676). Audible Audio, 5 pages. Author(s): Donald Barthelme, Dennis Holland (Narrator).

The Dead Father appears to be about pretty much everything: fatherhood; sex; religion and our place in it; and .

The Dead Father appears to be about pretty much everything: fatherhood; sex; religion and our place in it; and the history (or philosophical pseudohistory) of the novel’s land and its people, a few of whom turn out to be made of cardboard, as are some of the local animals, which is a fact that does not inhibit the Dead Father from slaying.

The Dead Father is a gargantuan half-dead, half-alive, part mechanical, wise, vain, powerful .

The Dead Father is a gargantuan half-dead, half-alive, part mechanical, wise, vain, powerful being who still has hopes for himself. In the austere, extraordinary prose that strongly influenced a generation of fiction writers, Donald Barthelme offered in The Dead Father a glimpse into his unique fictional universe: a many-shaded landscape of first and last things, striking, comic, manic, inevitable. People Who Liked The Dead Father Also Liked These Free Titles

Donald Barthelme's Sixty Stories is a collection of some of his greatest work from the 1960s and 1970s. Each of these pieces is raucous, absurd, incisive, and beautiful; each represents not only a story, but the re-imagination of the story as a form.

Dennis Holland, Donald Barthelme. There is nothing unusual about the foot, except that it is seven meters high. Nineteen people are dragging, by means of a cable, an immense carcass through the countryside. The carcass is that of the Dead Father, a half-dead, half-alive, part-mechanical, wise, vain, powerful being who still has hopes for himself, although he is, effectively, dead

Donald Barthelme (April 7, 1931 – July 23, 1989) was an American short story writer and novelist known for his playful, postmodernist style of short fiction

Donald Barthelme (April 7, 1931 – July 23, 1989) was an American short story writer and novelist known for his playful, postmodernist style of short fiction.

Barthelme’s father, a professor of architecture, was . The book is both a homage to post-modern traditions and a tool for authors that succeeded him.

Barthelme’s father, a professor of architecture, was demanding of his rebellious son growing up. He often didn’t agree with the type of writing his son was attempting to d. The book’s story arc follows a band of people dragging the Dead Father across what is portrayed as a dystopian wasteland.

Dennis Holland delivers a well-paced, entertaining performance of Barthelme's classic. As the titular character-the Dead Father, a huge, half-dead, semimechanical godlike ruler-is dragged by a group of his children across his lands toward his burial spot, bizarre and increasingly absurd exploits and conversations unfold. Holland, a seasoned reader of Barthelme's work, does ample justice to the tone and spirit of the text. His comedic timing is superb, as is his voice for the Dead Father.

“There is nothing unusual about the foot, except that it is seven meters high.” Nineteen people are dragging, by means of a cable, an immense carcass through the countryside. The carcass is that of the Dead Father, a half-dead, half-alive, part-mechanical, wise, vain, powerful being who still has hopes for himself, although he is, effectively, dead. Thomas, Julie, Edmund, Emma, and the others variously insult, placate, cater to, and defend the Dead Father as the procession moves through the country of the Wends, the territory of the Great Father Serpent, and a variety of encounters and explorations toward its mysterious goal.

In the austere, extraordinary prose that strongly influenced a generation of fiction writers, Donald Barthelme offered in The Dead Father a glimpse into his unique fictional universe: a many-shaded landscape of first and last things, striking, comic, manic, inevitable.

Comments: (7)
in waiting
Barthelme employs all the tools of post-modernism to discuss progression and how the past clings to us, influences us even if we try to ignore it. A fable that covers literature, family, politics, gender roles, etc. If you can get through the more difficult parts, it comes together at the end. Not necessarily recommended for the beginning reader, but mostly for literature heads looking to see what happens after Beckett.
Kulalas
This is another book I read because it was recommended as one of 1001 books to read before I die. It was published at a time when I was reading the law and then starting a career so I missed it. I personally didn't enjoy it which may be a weakness on my part. I should add some chapters and some side comments were fun. This is another example of the post-Vietnam war literature which I guess I don't understand though I think it was meant for my generation. I m still glad to have read it.
Fordredor
Could not connect with this author. Just could not get involved with this silly story and the author's style. I hated it!
Katishi
An unconventional book. I had to read it for a class... I probably wouldn't ever read it again.
POFOD
A little too far fetched for me.
Hiclerlsi
Though i must say i prefer his short stories, Don B has nothing short of a fab read here.

There was a point in the book where I realized in my head I had equated the DF to Bernie from 'Weekend at Bernie's'. If this isn't enjoyable, then I don't know what is.

It's been said that the perfect preface to the book is Plath's "Daddy" and I would have to agree.
Minnai
To call 'The Dead Father' a novel is a bit of stretch. It's more of a musing, a strange dream. What there is of a story here lacks focus. It's interesting for a bit, but grows tiresome. Perhaps the book's best part is a book within the book called 'The Manual for Sons', in which a number if differing father types are presented for satirical scrutiny: it's not a pretty picture; but it is entertaining.

The praise this novel receives is most likely attributed to its 'differentness', and given the time it was published, in the mid '70s, when there were plenty of calls for the death of the novel and such, and the continued march of post-modern games masquerading as novels, it's not surprising that the 'lit-heads' of the time were fascinated by this one. So if you like that sort of thing, this is for you. Otherwise try out Barthelme's short fiction first; it's far more rewarding - his true metier.
I hate experimental fiction. Don DeLillo and his ilk, they bore me; it's just a lot of fake cleverness. But this book, while you can't deny the avantness of its garde, is...well...the first page brings up the question of just what exactly is lodged in the supine, mile-tall Dead Father's teeth. "Mackerel salad. At least we think it is mackerel salad. In the sagas, it is mackerel salad." Wildly fantastic, caustically funny ( the sex scenes will make you fall out of your chair), prosodically innovative ( I believe Barthelme has invented his own verb tense) and yet, easy to follow and, really, with an old-fashioned plot. It is a parable about the overthrow of old tyrannies -- and in spite of all the literary smartaleckitude it is tender and genuinely moving. You have never read anybody like Barthelme, and if you can find this book anywhere (out of PRINT! how DARE they? ) treasure it. Nothing like it has ever been written or will be again. Sixty-eight stars (if they would allow it.)