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eBook I Was Amelia Earhart download

by Jane Mendelsohn

eBook I Was Amelia Earhart download ISBN: 0679450548
Author: Jane Mendelsohn
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf; 1st edition (April 2, 1996)
Language: English
ePub: 1158 kb
Fb2: 1434 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit doc mbr azw
Category: Literature
Subcategory: United States

In the second half of this novel Jane Mendelsohn recounts the time following their disappearance. It is told to us in Earhart's own words with occasional narration

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). In the second half of this novel Jane Mendelsohn recounts the time following their disappearance. It is told to us in Earhart's own words with occasional narration. The log book which Amelia kept during the time after her exit from our world reflects her introspective self analysis and evolution of her understanding of relationships not only between humans but with the rest of nature and the cosmos.

Jane Mendelsohn was born and raised in New York City. Discover new books on Goodreads. She is the author of three novels: the best-selling I Was Amelia Earhart, shortlisted for the Orange Prize, and Innocence, and American Music. She is a graduate of Yale. See if your friends have read any of Jane Mendelsohn's books. Published to wide acclaim by Knopf in 2010, American Music is now out in paperback from Vintage. Jane Mendelsohn’s books.

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I Was Amelia Earhart by Jane Mendelsohn was a strange reading experience. This is a dreamy book about what could have happened to Amelia Earhart on her round-the-world airplane flight in 1937. Instead of a outward look at the life of Amelia Earhart, this was more akin to being inside Amelia Earhart looking out. The. This is a dreamy book about what could have happened to Amelia Earhart on her round-the-world airplane flight in 1937 Читать весь отзыв.

I was Amelia Earhart : a novel. Books for People with Print Disabilities. by. Mendelsohn, Jane, 1965-. A memoir by Amelia Earhart, the aviatrix, describing her life and her romance with Fred Noonan, the navigator, after they disappeared on their round-the-world flight in 1937. On the subject of her life she writes, "Noonan once said any fool could have seen I was risking my life without living i. Of the desert island where they crashed, "We call it Heaven, as a kind of joke. A moving tale by a first novelist. Internet Archive Books.

In this brilliantly imagined novel, Amelia Earhart tells us what happened after she and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared off the coast of New Guinea. By Jane Mendelsohn Read by Blair Brown. Part of Vintage Contemporaries. Category: Historical Fiction Literary Fiction.

Jane Mendelsohn: I wrote the book before Donald Trump was a prominent figure on the political scene, but many of the issues . I Was Amelia Earhart, Jane Mendelsohn's first novel, was an international bestseller in 1996 and short-listed for the Orange Prize. Posted by the author's publisher).

Jane Mendelsohn: I wrote the book before Donald Trump was a prominent figure on the political scene, but many of the issues that led to the rise of Trump were present in the world, and I felt an urgent need to write about them n New York whose domineering personality sets off a chain of events within his family that unleashes the worst dangers inherent in his empire. Vintage Books & Anchor Books.

Jane Mendelsohn was born in New York City, July 4, 1965. She was graduated summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, from Yale University in 1987, and attended Yale Law School for one year before beginning a career as a writer/journalist. In 1992, Ms. Mendelsohn spotted an article in The New York Times about the discovery of a piece of a plane believed to have been Amelia Earhart's. The article mentioned that Earhart traveled with a navigator, Fred Noonan, who was with her on her last flight.

In this brilliantly imagined novel, Amelia Earhart tells us what happened after she and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared off the coast of New Guinea one glorious, windy day in 1937. And she tells us about herself.There is her love affair with flying ("The sky is flesh") . . . .There are her memories of the past: her childhood desire to become a heroine ("Heroines did what they wanted") . . . her marriage to G.P. Putnam, who promoted her to fame, but was willing to gamble her life so that the book she was writing about her round-the-world flight would sell out before Christmas.There is the flight itself -- day after magnificent or perilous or exhilarating or terrifying day ("Noonan once said any fool could have seen I was risking my life but not living it").And there is, miraculously, an island ("We named it Heaven, as a kind of joke").And, most important, there is Noonan . . .
Comments: (7)
Loni
Author Mendelsohn probably didn't need to add the name Earhart after Amelia since anyone older than 30 probably can't think of anyone else named Amelia. Like Lindbergh there was only one. And in our mind's eye she is forever 39, classy, slender, athletic, good looking with a "kiss my butt" attitude and the guts of a burglar.

She knew from young she would be a heroine and didn't suffer the faint of heart. When the word went out across what passed as the media in 1939 that her plane was missing millions of just plain folks held their collective breaths. It is not a spoiler to say that she slipped out of the firmament that day in 1939 into that historical status of one of the great enigmas of the twentieth century. As far as we know Amelia and her plane have never been seen again.

It goes without saying that theories surrounding her disappearance are as common as dust. As time dragged on and we plunged into WWII one of the favorites was that she was taken prisoner with all that entails. Others believed she was stranded some where on a desert island. Searches for her remains and that of her plane continue to this day as the clock and calendar stride inexorably onward toward 75 years since that faithful day.

But this book is only marginally about that. The build up to the day she flew off to conquer the world is told in little vignettes from her personal life. We are treated in this fictional version of a part of her life to the occasional doubts and depression that invaded her veneer. We meet her husband and promoter George P. Putnam. We are introduced to her navigator Fred Noonan who is portrayed as a hopeless if not hopeful alcoholic. He is competent and talented but with his looks, personality and propensity for the sauce this hail fellow was usually pretty much worthless first thing in the morning. With this companion and a compromised communication system Amelia set off to circumnavigate the globe equatorially in her beloved Lockheed Electra 10E.

In the second half of this novel Jane Mendelsohn recounts the time following their disappearance. It is told to us in Earhart's own words with occasional narration. Amelia Earhart was an accomplished and successful writer and was the Aviation Editor for Cosmopolitan. The log book which Amelia kept during the time after her exit from our world reflects her introspective self analysis and evolution of her understanding of relationships not only between humans but with the rest of nature and the cosmos. Both she and Noonan go through a bit of metamorphosis and become by turns estranged and close. The author does not over embellish but the writing is nearly poetry. My favorite line is As they flew into oblivion "... wondering which of us was more forsaken: the navigator who didn't care where we were going or the pilot who didn't care if we ever got there."

No conclusions, no wrapping up, no great mystery solved; a good companionable read that puts you right there on the beach. I'll say no more. Short and sweet. 3* GIBO
tamada
Our local library selected this book as the choice for Westport Reads, a community month-long event during which the entire town is supposed to read the same book. I understand why they chose this book as certainly the questions of how we live are paramount to the book. The author imagines Amelia Earhart's life both future and past from the perspective (mostly) of Earhart if she had survived and landed on an atoll or small island with her navigator. The two find peace that neither had achieved within the context of their normal lives and the text asks the question,"What is paradise to you?" As most of us know, it's not what we might expect. Thus, the book was a good choice for starting conversations throughout a town. Historical fiction is tricky, because the author imposes insight onto not entirely fictitious characters as they are based on individuals who actually existed and had their own experiences, consequences and systems of belief. It's pleasant to consider alternate existences and that's what fiction is all about. But, historical fiction can be tricky. The author maintains Amelia's voice and makes a believable argument towards catharsis. I struggle more with the genre in general than with her approach. It's entirely fair to imagine, "what if..." and a well-known historical figure such as Earhart inspires curiosity.
Umge
The first part of the book is wonderful. In it, the author added what she conceived to possibly have been Amelia Earhart's thoughts on top of actual history. Part 2 is a story about "life" after the plane crash-landed on a deserted island. All in all, it was a pleasant reading experience. It fits nicely into the category of "beach reading."
Stan
I had read "I Was Amelia Earhart" well over ten years ago and always counted it as one of my favorite books. After seeing an Amelia Earhart special on NatGeo channel recently, one that covered all the speculations about what happened to her, I realized I missed the little book! Not finding it on my bookshelves (obviously not returned by the last person I'd loaned it to), I headed to Amazon.com and was so glad to find some used copies in good shape--practically perfect shape, in fact. The style is enchanting, switching without the reader's notice between first and third person and the detail is true to the imagination of a person wondering about her end. It IS a little book...about vertical postcard size and just over 130 pages...but not little in its effect. I highly recommend this book.
Marinara
Amelia Earhart was married in her sister's home not far from where I live and I saw her signiture on an old register when I visited the Narragansett Hotel on Block Island, R.I.several years ago.
The book was interesting from the respect that recent evidence seems to further the theory that Amelia and her navigator landed on Howland Island and died there. The novel softens the blow of the thinking that they suffered a violent death when their plane ran out of gas and plunged into the Pacific ocean.
A good read and I highly recommend to people who still wonder and speculate about Amelia's fate.
Silver Globol
I wanted to keep reading to know how this would end. It definitely kept me interested and was a nice way to think about what may have happened (at least partly) to Amelia Earhart.
OwerSpeed
Well, this was an interesting book and one I enjoyed. Wish I could write like this lady.
Will read again.
The author of this book speculates on what might have happened to Amelia Earhart and her navigator had they survived the crash. It is an interesting study on perceived survival techniques. I'm not sure they would have survived for as long as the reader is led to think.