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eBook The Red Pony download

by John Steinbeck

eBook The Red Pony download ISBN: 0670829900
Author: John Steinbeck
Publisher: Viking Juvenile; Reprint edition (October 1, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 128
ePub: 1110 kb
Fb2: 1210 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit azw mbr lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: United States

Born in Salinas, California, in 1902, John Steinbeck grew up in a fertile agricultural valley about twenty-five miles from the Pacific Coast - and both valley and coast would serve as settings for some of his best fiction.

Born in Salinas, California, in 1902, John Steinbeck grew up in a fertile agricultural valley about twenty-five miles from the Pacific Coast - and both valley and coast would serve as settings for some of his best fiction. In 1919 he went to Stanford University, where he intermittently enrolled in literature and writing courses until he left in 1925 without taking a degree.

The Red Pony is not, as I stated in the beginning, a book for children, but it is preeminently a book about a child. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1973.

Home John Steinbeck The Red Pony. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11. "It might.

Самая большая электронная читалка рунета. Поиск книг и журналов. Billy Buck sat down on the steps, because he was a cow hand, and it wouldn't be fitting that he should go first into the 3 John Steinbeck dining-room. Children's Books - Steinbeck, John - The Red Pony (Children's Books). He heard Mr. Tiflin in the house, stamping his feet into his boots. The high jangling note of the triangle put the boy Jody in motion.

The Red Pony by John Steinbeck; (5 ) In this small but mighty Steinbeck book of short stories we get to meet Jody, his ma and pa and the ranch hand, Billy Buck. All four stories are coming of age. In recent years Steinbeck has been elevated to a more prominent status among American writers of his generation. If not quite at the world-class artistic level of a Hemingway or a Faulkner, he is nonetheless read very widely throughout the world by readers of all ages who consider him one of the most "American" of writers. Born in Salinas County, California on February 27, 1902, Steinbeck was of German-Irish parentage.

The Red Pony is an episodic novella written by American writer John Steinbeck in 1933. The first three chapters were published in magazines from 1933–1936, and the full book was published in 1937 by Covici Friede

The Red Pony is an episodic novella written by American writer John Steinbeck in 1933. The first three chapters were published in magazines from 1933–1936, and the full book was published in 1937 by Covici Friede. The stories in the book are tales of a boy named Jody Tiflin. The book has four different stories about Jody and his life on his father's California ranch.

The stories chronicle a young boy’s maturation. In The Gift, the best-known story, young Jody Tiflin is given a red pony by his rancher father. Under ranch hand Billy Buck’s guidance, Jody learns to care for and train his pony, which he names Gabilan. Caught in an unexpected rain, Gabilan catches a cold and, despite Billy Buck’s ministrations, dies. Jody watches the buzzards alight on the body of his beloved pony, and, distraught at his inability to control events, he kills one of them.

He had been to the barn, had thrown rocks at the swallows’ nests under the eaves until every one of the little mud houses broke open and dropped its lining of straw and dirty feathers.

He had been to the barn, had thrown rocks at the swallows’ nests under the eaves until every one of the little mud houses broke open and dropped its lining of straw and dirty feathers nch house he baited a rat trap with stale cheese and set it where Doubletree Mutt, that good big dog, would get his nose snapped. Jody was not moved by an impulse of cruelty; he was bored with the long hot afternoon. Doubletree Mutt put his stupid nose in the trap and got it smacked, and shrieked with agony and limped away with blood on his nostrils.

The Red Pony by John Steinbeck; (5 ) In this small but mighty Steinbeck book of short stories we get to meet . Early in the 1940s, Steinbeck became a filmmaker with The Forgotten Village (1941) and a serious student of marine biology with Sea of Cortez (1941).

Reissued from a 1945 limited edition, this timeless American classic--illustrated with watercolor paintings--traces a boy's journey into manhood
Comments: (7)
Nalmezar
This story tells the life of a Northern California farm in the early 1900s, and Jody Tiflis, the farmer's son, from roughly age 10-12. It's odd that the story is called The Red Pony, because the episode of the pony only takes about half the book. But getting and caring for the pony is a seminal event in Jody's life, and one that changes him from a child into a young adult. His unquestioning adulation of Billy, the ranch hand, changes to a more mature and forgiving love. His fear of his father becomes a mature acceptance of Carl's shortcomings.
While I was hoping the story would turn out differently, this is the way things happen on a farm, even today, with or without veterinarians' help. Events have a true-to-life feel, as though most of them really happened in the author's life. The style is almost poetically beautiful. A wonderful read!
Not-the-Same
I discovered the works of John Steinbeck back in 1981-ish when I was trying to "expand my horizons" as a literate person trying to move on from shoddy works of horror, (which I still love reading) to more thought provoking and meaningful works of fiction. Of course several books by John Steinbeck were on this list of "MUST READS". Reading John for the first time was an awaking to me. I discovered that a good book was more than just being 17 and reading a story and hoping for cuss words...oh no...,as I discovered at 25, there is so much more to a good book. John became one of my favorites and I've read his works more than once. As I am now in a position to do some traveling, I began looking for was to travel and still enjoy a good book. Of course, the audiobook is perfect for this. Which brings me, finally, to The Red Ponys narrator, Frank Muller. I first heard Frank Muller as an audiobook narrator when I bought Stephen Kings Dark Tower II: The Drawing of the Three on Cassette for a trip from TX to MI. It was a case of, I"ll give this a try and see if if sucks or not. Let me tell you, it did not suck. Frank was the voice of Stephen King. He was also the voice for Charles Dickens and Herman Melville and Jack London and Pat Conroy. He knew how to tell a story and how to use his voice to take the listener by the hand and show what was happening. There are many good audiobook narrators, but none,(in my opinion) has ever reached the level of greatness that Frank did. That Frank is no longer with us makes me miss him more. There will be no more books read the way Frank read them. And that is the listeners loss. I am on my own quest now. And that is to find and purchase as many audiobooks narrated by Frank Muller as I can.

This review, I suppose, is about two things. The wonderful story of Jody and his initiation into the world of death, birth, and disappointment as told by John Steinbeck, and Frank Mullers interpretation of Johns short novel. If you want to read a good story, you won't be disappointed reading John Steinbecks moving tale. If you want to hear the story, find this edition read by Frank Muller. Together, John and Frank will touch your heart and make you feel joy and loss and love and hurt.
Melipra
I signed on as a volunteer coach at the National Steinbeck Center’s Young Authors’ Day and learned that the 6-8 graders would be writing about the first chapter of “The Red Pony.” Yikes, it was time to re-read the short book that I hadn’t opened in many years.

Here in the Land of Steinbeck (Monterey, CA), the man is revered—and rightfully so. “The Grapes of Wrath” and “East of Eden” are beautiful novels that still move readers, decades after their publication. “Cannery Row” and “Tortilla Flat” are whimsical, yet poignant tales from a bygone era of my neighborhood.

As I re-read “The Red Pony” and thought about today’s middle schoolers, I found the story of Jody, the somewhat mischievous 10-year-old farm boy with stern parents, less than riveting. Granted, the themes of death and dying, maturing as a result of difficult experiences, of wanting to please parents and earn their love, are timeless and universal. Steinbeck wrote about them in a simple, yet profound way that continues to make this little book a classic at the middle school level. Nonetheless, I couldn’t get past visions of the 31-year-old Steinbeck, not yet a fully formed novelist, scribbling away and honing his skills for the great works to come.

Do I recommend it for middle schoolers? Definitely. Just don’t expect Jody Tiflin to grab their interest the way Harry Potter and Katniss Everdeen do.
Konetav
Who dares to review Steinbeck's work? Not me! I loved "The Red Pony" the first time I read it, 45 years ago. I loved it again in 2015. Some American Classics - - particularly Steinbeck - - must be read more than once, years apart, to fully internalize the art and craft.
Inerrace
Great gift for my daughter!
*Nameless*
wonderful story, allows for good discussions on main idea, details of how to read and analyze.
Insanity
I loved this book and will probably read it again sometime. The story was simple but really warming and heartfelt. A perfect feel-good book.
Good read. A little odd that it reads as two books. Wh as t happened with the second horse? Still good.