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eBook A Complicated Kindness: A Novel download

by Miriam Toews

eBook A Complicated Kindness: A Novel download ISBN: 1582433224
Author: Miriam Toews
Publisher: Counterpoint (August 17, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 264
ePub: 1134 kb
Fb2: 1576 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc lrf mobi mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: United States

A Complicated Kindness (2004) is the third novel by Canadian author Miriam Toews. The novel won a number of awards including the Governor General's Award for English Fiction, the CBA Libris Fiction Award, and CBC's Canada Reads

A Complicated Kindness (2004) is the third novel by Canadian author Miriam Toews. The novel won a number of awards including the Governor General's Award for English Fiction, the CBA Libris Fiction Award, and CBC's Canada Reads. The novel is set in a small religious Mennonite town called East Village, generally considered to be a fictionalized version of Toews' hometown of Steinbach, Manitoba.

Toews does not turn "A Complicated Kindness" into a sour polemic. Her novel crackles with humor; there simply isn't a page where Nomi's mordant sensibilities don't elicit laughter. Toews' tart observations about East Village compete with Nomi's descriptions of the malignant characters circulating through her life. Her uncle, the major domo of the church, is called The Mouth; his wife, Aunt Gonad.

A Complicated Kindness book. In this stunning coming-of-age novel, award-winner Miriam Toews balances grief and hope in the voice of a witty, beleaguered teenager whose family is shattered by fundamentalist Christianity. Half of our family, the better-looking half, is missing," Nomi Nickel tells us at the beginning of A Complicated Kindness.

In A Complicated Kindness, Miriam Toews captures the spirit of boredom and desolation that comes from being trapped in a. .I have very mixed feelings about this book.

In A Complicated Kindness, Miriam Toews captures the spirit of boredom and desolation that comes from being trapped in a backward small town like few authors of her generation. Set in the Mennonite. There were times that I just wanted to put it aside, there was not much going on, and other times I kept reading to see what was going to happen to Nomi.

A complicated kindness : a novel. by. Toews, Miriam, 1964-. Teenage girls, Fathers and daughters, Maternal deprivation, Dysfunctional families, Mennonites. New York : Counterpoint. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

In this completely captivating book, Miriam Toews has created some of the most engaging characters in Canadian .

In this completely captivating book, Miriam Toews has created some of the most engaging characters in Canadian literature: Hattie, Logan and Thebes are bewildered, hopeful, angry, and most of all, absolutely alive. Full of richly skewed, richly funny detail, The Flying Troutmans is a uniquely affecting novel. From Publishers Weekly. A road novel helped along by a lovably nutty cast, Toews's latest (after A Complicated Kindness) follows a ragtag crew as they crisscross America

A Complicated Kindness': A Prairie Home Companion.

A Complicated Kindness': A Prairie Home Companion. By Liesl Schillinger. Such is the plight of Nomi, the 16-year-old narrator of Miriam Toews's brilliant third novel, "A Complicated Kindness," a coming-of-age story that takes place in the late 1970's and early 1980's in East Village, a claustrophobic Mennonite community in rural Manitoba. The only business in town (not counting Jesus) is a factory where chickens are slaughtered, and the only pleasure is the anticipation of eternal rest.

A Complicated Kindness - Toews Miriam - Читать книгу онлайн, скачать книгу бесплатно без регистрации. If I’m forced to read one more Narnia series book I’ll kill myself. I would love to read the diary of a girl my age - a girl from the city. Or a textbook on urban planning

A Complicated Kindness - Toews Miriam - Читать книгу онлайн, скачать книгу бесплатно без регистрации. Or a textbook on urban planning. Or a New York City phone book. I would kill to own a New York City phone book. Trudie always said her eyes were hazel, but in fact they’re the same smoky green as Ray’s. Trudie and Ray are second cousins.

I like to ride my bike to train crossings in empty fields and watch graffiti fly past me at a hundred miles an hour. It really is the perfect way to view art.

I like to ride my bike to train crossings in empty fields and watch graffiti fly past me at a hundred miles an hour s from Detroit or St. Louis for providing some colour in my life. I’ve often wanted to send a message back to them. Nomi from Nowhere says hello. But the train doesn’t stop here and I don’t have any spray paint. At night, I like to go to Purple City

In this stunning coming-of-age novel, award-winner Miriam Toews balances grief and hope in the voice of a witty, beleaguered teenager whose family is shattered by fundamentalist Christianity"Half of our family, the better-looking half, is missing," Nomi Nickel tells us at the beginning of A Complicated Kindness. Left alone with her sad, peculiar father, her days are spent piecing together why her mother and sister have disappeared and contemplating her inevitable career at Happy Family Farms, a chicken slaughterhouse on the outskirts of East Village. Not the East Village in New York City where Nomi would prefer to live, but an oppressive town founded by Mennonites on the cold, flat plains of Manitoba, Canada.This darkly funny novel is the world according to the unforgettable Nomi, a bewildered and wry sixteen-year-old trapped in a town governed by fundamentalist religion and in the shattered remains of a family it destroyed. In Nomi's droll, refreshing voice, we're told the story of an eccentric, loving family that falls apart as each member lands on a collision course with the only community any of them have ever known. A work of fierce humor and tragedy by a writer who has taken the American market by storm, this searing, tender, comic testament to family love will break your heart.
Comments: (7)
Billy Granson
I've become a big fan of Ms. Toews. Her stories are sad, compelling, moving, and funny.Built pretty unabashedly on the author's own life, though still fiction, they evocatively depict life in a rural Mennonite community in Canada, from the perspective of, in the case of A Complicated Kindness, a conflicted, troubled adolescent girl raised in a non-conforming family. Her characters are vivid, quirky, and interesting. One of the most intriguing aspects of Toews's writing is how she incorporates dialog. She doesn't use quotation marks. That's not all that unusual - a lot of writers do that. But with her, several exchanges between characters can occur in a single paragraph, and intermix with the protagonist's inner thoughts. That may sound like it should be confusing, but I never, ever got confused. It made perfect sense throughout. It felt to me like I was listening to a story told by a camp fire. It flows wonderfully.

The only reason I didn't give this book 5 stars is because I don't think it's quite as good as All My Puny Sorrows, so I had to give it less than a perfect score. Call it a four-and-a-half.
Anaginn
This is a well-written book, but it is horribly depressing. There is in theory nothing wrong with a depressing book, but it was so sad I actually resented it. Some of the other reviewers seem to see Nomi Nickel as a "cute" little teen growing up, sort of a Mennonite
Gidget. In fact she is a severely depressed girl who loses her mother and older sister, and whose father and best friend are kind, but clearly psychotic. In reaction to the ultra-conservatism of her sad town, she goes to the opposite extreme, and drinks, drugs, and has sex too early. The end is very well-written, but we don't know what happens to Nomi. We don't know if she leaves her town,
or sits alone and spends her whole life dreaming in her head. One issue the book raises is: Do we see Nomi and her family as psychologically Disturbed, or do we see their behavior as coming from the small community they live in? Interesting, but I am still worried Nomi is alone in her house, still daydreaming.
Quinthy
I read this book first when I was about fifteen. I heard snippets of it on a CBC radio broadcast, and it really got under my skin. The book has shaped a lot of my perspectives and really resounded with me because I empathized with the main character's experiences in growing up in a small town.

With that out of the way, the sense of humour, the unique writing style, and the imagery are all really strong here. The author is sympathetic even to antagonistic characters, and it's great. Everyone is held responsible for their actions, too.

I do think some readers will dislike the ending, and that prose style does take getting used to as well.

All in all, it's a wonderful book by a really good author, and I have to recommend it for all ages--particularly people who think YA is all fluffy romance and post-apocalyptic adventure.
Invissibale
"A Complicated Kindness" is a work of extreme adolescent alienation and unalloyed angst. No mere coming-of-age novel, its subject matter, a young woman's frustrated rage against the suffocating strictures of a small religious sect in an isolated rural Canadian community, is bound to upset its readers. Its author, Miriam Toews, has created a disenchanted, bewildered and embittered protagonist whose rebellion against her tightly-controlled environment rarely produces positive results. In fact, Nomi Nickel receives no solace, spiritual guidance or moral direction from her sequestered Mennonite community. The ironically named East Village is, to Nomi, death-in-life -- everywhere from its major industry, a slaughterhouse for chickens to its otherworldly preoccupation with damnation and the afterlife.

Against this repressive milieu, Nomi's mother and sister have fled precipitously, leaving her to fend for herself with her overmatched father. Her oldest sister, Tash, wantonly flouts convention, brazenly embracing a life-sytle that literally predetermines her excommunication from the church and town. More intriguing is the torment her mother, Trudie, experiences. Divided in loyalty between husband, family and faith, Trudie elects an understated subversion of Mennonite tyranny. Her inability to make decisions, her unspoken support of Tash's revolt and her agonizing ultimate decision to flee make her the quiet, invisible embodiment of discontent.

In the wake of their departure, Nomi and her befuddled father Ray make do poorly. The disappearance of the home's furniture eerily mirrors the absence of Trudie and Tash. Ray, a devoted sixth-grade teacher, adheres to the structure of Mennonite behaviors, even including wearing a coat and tie to a demolition derby which he attends with Nomi. His heart, torn asunder from conflicted loyalties and the tormented love he has for both his wife and his faith, cannot expand sufficiently to take care of his remaining daughter. Consequently, Nomi's life spirals inexorably out of control. Cigarettes, drugs and rock music cannot staunch her emotional bleeding. Limited by an understandable poor self-image and resisting social pressures for too enormous to battle alone, Nomi flounders. Even halfhearted attempts at sexual expression fail in bittersweet hopelessness.

Toews does not turn "A Complicated Kindness" into a sour polemic. Her novel crackles with humor; there simply isn't a page where Nomi's mordant sensibilities don't elicit laughter. Toews' tart observations about East Village compete with Nomi's descriptions of the malignant characters circulating through her life. Her uncle, the major domo of the church, is called The Mouth; his wife, Aunt Gonad. Nomi's friends are a rogue's gallery of teen-aged desperation -- from The Comb, East Village's accommodating pusher; Lydia, her emotionally devastated friend, hospitalized for depression; her feckless boyfriend Travis, whose callow cowardice belies his grandiose dreams.

Even though "A Complicated Kindness" is a dazzling success, it does have some inexplicable flaws. Nomi's character wanders from genuine adolescent authenticity to an unbelievable omniscient figure; the character often says things that Nobel laureates would be proud to utter. On numerous occasions, characters become caricatures, sapping the novel's gritty realism for cheap laughs and satirical overkill. Questions posed by the relationship between Ray and Trudie deserve better consideration than the pat answers "A Complicated Kindness" provides. It comes as no shock to the reader that there are several surprise twists at the novel's conclusion.

That being said, "A Complicated Kindness" is an extremely important book. Its honesty, insights and sensitivities reveal its author's enormous talents. In Nomi Nickel, Miriam Toews has created an adolescent anti-hero for the late twentieth century, one who could easily hold her own with Holden Caulfield.