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eBook Mazes and Monsters download

by Rona Jaffe

eBook Mazes and Monsters download ISBN: 0385286392
Author: Rona Jaffe
Publisher: Delacorte Pr; First Edition edition (September 1, 1981)
Language: English
ePub: 1506 kb
Fb2: 1753 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lit doc txt lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: United States

I know Mazes and Monsters is a very popular game on this campus. I played it for two years. The game takes control of your life.

In the spring of 1980 a bright, gifted student at Grant University in Pequod, Pennsylvania, mysteriously disappeared. I know Mazes and Monsters is a very popular game on this campus. I strongly warn anybody who is thinking of starting to stop, and anyone who is playing it to quit before it’s too late. Perhaps what was most disturbing about this case was something that was on every parent’s mind.

Mazes and Monsters (also known as Rona Jaffe's Mazes and Monsters) is a 1982 American made-for-television drama film directed by Steven Hilliard Stern about a group of college students and their interest in a fictitious role-playing game (RPG) . .

Mazes and Monsters (also known as Rona Jaffe's Mazes and Monsters) is a 1982 American made-for-television drama film directed by Steven Hilliard Stern about a group of college students and their interest in a fictitious role-playing game (RPG) of the same name. The movie starred a 26-year-old Tom Hanks in his first leading film role. The film was adapted from a novel of the same name by Rona Jaffe.

Mazes and Monsters is a 1981 novel by Rona Jaffe. The novel is a cautionary tale regarding the then-new hobby of fantasy role-playing games. The book was adapted into a made-for-television movie by the same name in 1982 starring Tom Hanks. The novel is based in large part on the largely apocryphal "steam tunnel incidents" of the late 1970s.

However Rona Jaffe is not one of those Edwardian style writers that eventually get around to what may be a plot. Each chapter is only a few pages and I am not sure just what criterion is used to call it a chapter. Then periodic lay there would be a "Part" and the chapter numbers started from chapter one again.

Chill winds blew, and it snowed. ants of some totalitarian country;. ants of some totalitarian country; asexual, dogged, unfrivolous. Underneath their colorless uniforms, however, they seethed with life.

Mazes and Monsters book. There is a blurb from Cosmopolitan magazine in the back of this book that reads, "Reading Rona Jaffe is like being presented with a Cartier watch; you know exactly what you're getting and it's just what you want. For me, it's like really good cheesecake: completely empty calories and completely filling.

Part thriller, part love story, Mazes and Monsters is a spellbinding novel about a group of college students in the 1980s who use a fantasy game as refuge from their personal, emotional, and social problems. Based loosely on the steam tunnel incidents of the 1970s, the four friends-Kate, Jay Jay, Daniel, and Robbie-eventually take their game too far when they decide to live-action role-play in the caverns near their college campus.

Mazes and Monsters - Rona Jaffe. Mazes and Monsters - Rona Jaffe.

Mazes and monsters : a novel. Mazes and monsters : a novel. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on February 8, 2010.

Four university friends, obsessed with a fantasy, role-playing game delve into the darkest parts of their minds and carry the game one terrible step too far
Comments: (7)
Nayatol
Love this book
Watikalate
I am someone who hates to read, but this book I started back in college, and did not get very far. This time i could not put it down. It was a good read . A little slow in parts . I had an ok ending.
Adoranin
I'm not sure of the target audience for this when first published but I was not it. Re-reading (why? idle curiosity to see if it was as bad as I recalled -- yep!), proves I'm still not that audience and I still can't figure out how this came to be made into a film. Blame it on the 80s, I suppose. All said and done, the book beats the movie, but not by much.
Whitegrove
One of the most poorly written novels of all time, but it is a part of D&D culture and lore so it gets bumped up to 2 stars.
Hanelynai
WARNING: Review contains spoilers.

I learned about a rather lousy made-for-TV movie called "Mazes and Monsters" from Noah Antwiler's website, The Spoony Experiment, where he did a video review on it. I had seen the movie at our local library and was curious, given that the DVD cover seems to tote it as a fantasy thriller starring Tom Hanks, but upon finding out that it was actually a straight-to-TV "Lifetime movie" about the evils of the Dungeons and Dragons role-playing game, I lost interest. The movie looked bad, and the whole effort to make tabletop RPGs look like a recruiting tool of Satan or a psychologically destructive pastime seemed rather silly to me.

When I found out said movie was actually based on a book, however, I bit. I knew it was going to be bad, but I was curious to see just how bad it could get. And in that respect, it didn't exactly disappoint.

Four college kids get together to play an obvious DnD ripoff called Mazes and Monsters, using the game as a means to escape from the problems of their real lives -- Daniel's controlling parents who reject his dreams of becoming a video game designer, Kate's near-rape experience and distrust of men, Jay Jay's famous and wealthy but emotionally distant parents and his feelings of being out of place as the youngest student on campus, and Robbie's emotional struggle with the disappearance of his older brother. At one point, Jay Jay suggests they take the game to the next level by having a live-action role-playing session in the caverns near the campus, and his friends readily agree. But Robbie, already emotionally unstable, starts to slip into the persona of his character, and eventually abandons his friends to go on a quest to find "The Great Hall." As the police become involved and the game comes under suspicion, the other three players have to find Robbie and try to snap him out of his persona before he injures someone... or himself.

I have to admit that "Mazes and Monsters" isn't bad... for a first draft. Yes, it's an obvious rough draft -- apparently Rona Jaffe wrote the book in a matter of days in order to cash in on a recent headline (the disappearance of college student James Dallas Egbert), and it shows. The book breaks the cardinal rule of "show, don't tell," dumping information in great chunks instead of allowing the reader to gather said info on their own. And the middle third of the book is taken up with describing the students' home lives and families, when I feel this would have been more effectively done at the beginning of the book.

The characters are likable -- the driven yet vulnerable Kate, the intelligent leader Daniel, the quirky jokester Jay Jay, and the sweet yet troubled Robbie -- and for the most part they feel well developed. But they aren't given enough to do, and the book isn't long enough to accommodate the lives and actions of all four of them, especially as they end up having to share page space with their parents as well. This book could have benefited from some extra page space, as well as a rewrite.

The biggest flaw of this book is that it seems the author can't really decide whether to use the book to demonize Dungeons and Dragons and other role-playing games, or to tell a character-driven story. And in trying to do both, she succeeds at neither. The characters and their interesting lives are shoved aside in favor of the "Dungeons and Dragons is immature, emotionally stunting, and dangerous" message, and the ending -- where three of the characters have grown up, dismissed the game as childish, and go on to live fulfilling lives while the fourth who clings to the game ends up with mental illness -- just hammers the reader over the head with it all the more. And yet the author undermines her own message by developing the characters so much beforehand, and making it clear that Robbie had problems before playing the game and so the game isn't to blame for his psychotic break. Unless that was her intention the entire time, though it's remarkably unclear.

What's frustrating is that there's the makings of a decent (not great, but decent and readable) character-driven story in this book, but the fact that this book is so obviously a published rough draft and chooses to preach over telling said story spoils it. This book could have used a re-write, and to have the anti-DnD message toned way down. These characters deserve better than the book they were put in, as well as a better author who can put the story before the soapbox-preaching.

For the true story behind this book -- and to see just how off the mark this obvious fictionalization is -- read The Dungeon Master: The Disappearance of James Dallas Egbert III by William Dear. For a better book about Dungeons and Dragons players, one with an actual story instead of a soapbox, read Into the Wild Nerd Yonder by Julie Halpern. "Mazes and Monsters" is mostly a curiosity, a product of its time whose "DnD is EVIL!" message has not aged well over the years.
Jarortr
There is a fine line between thought and deed, fiction and reality, perception and fact. Written before the internet age, possibly based on a real story, the virtual lives of Rona's characters are replicated far more by today's glass-eyed Candy Crush playing generation than hers.

The idea of exploring an imaginary world of dragons, treasure, excitement, danger and ultimately (for one) victory is not new. I'm sure numerous daydreaming accountants, librarians and office-workers spend hours indulging, instaed of doing any work. For many others, sexual fantasies rule - especially for those into s & m!

There were some problems with this book: the pen pictures of Kate, Jay Jay, Robbie and Daniel's families were insufficiently deep to resonate or add much to their persona's - and the staccato nature of the short chapters didn't always work, but might have helped an avid reader with a low attention-span, partially engaged in a contemporary computer game.

The college scenes were good - the parties, drinking, brief flings, minor irritations, meaningful convesations about meaningless subjects...I went to uni, but lived at home so didn't fully experience it. But it is the deep vortex of the game that is the star - and the inability of one player to escape from it.

We never learn what happened to Robbie's brother who walked out, never to return: maybe he's somewhere near Greenwich Village playing Mazes and Monsters right now, about to join his sibling in intra-terrestrial existence.

Kate is exactly the sort of girl we all want to meet but never do - but not if she's going to lead us down to those dangerous caverns.

As the 21st Century reaches puberty, we should recognise that reality, personal contact and relationships, real, rather than virtual intimacy, make for a better world. Maybe this book was an early warning of what we might face if we ignore the danger signs....
Folsa
I had seen the movie first. I like to read the books that inspire movies.

The book has more background details and descriptions of the characters than is need for the story. However Rona Jaffe is not one of those Edwardian style writers that eventually get around to what may be a plot.

Each chapter is only a few pages and I am not sure just what criterion is used to call it a chapter. Then periodic lay there would be a "Part" and the chapter numbers started from chapter one again.

I am used to playing D & D. Also with the advent of computers "Colossal Cave" or "Adventure" and see that it as a wrinkle to the story not the focus. What seems too much detail here is just a vehicle to display the foibles of the players.

As the story unfolds about friends playing the great game together and this mishap that unfold, especially the epilogue this could have been the screen play for the movie.