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eBook Beyond the Curve (Modern Japanese Writers Series) download

by Kobo Abe

eBook Beyond the Curve (Modern Japanese Writers Series) download ISBN: 4770016905
Author: Kobo Abe
Publisher: Kodansha USA Inc (February 1, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 248
ePub: 1651 kb
Fb2: 1924 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc mbr mobi rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Short Stories and Anthologies

Kōbō Abe (安部 公房, Abe Kōbō), pen name of Kimifusa Abe (安部 公房, Abe Kimifusa, March 7, 1924 – January 22, 1993), was a Japanese writer, playwright, musician, photographer and inventor.

Kōbō Abe (安部 公房, Abe Kōbō), pen name of Kimifusa Abe (安部 公房, Abe Kimifusa, March 7, 1924 – January 22, 1993), was a Japanese writer, playwright, musician, photographer and inventor. Abe has been often compared to Franz Kafka and Alberto Moravia for his modernist sensibilities and his surreal, often nightmarish explorations of individuals in contemporary society.

Kobo Abe is the kind of writer who reminds one of other writers. This book was translated from Japanese, and although some of the phrasing seems awkward at times, it actually enhances the overall surrealism of Abe's writing. His Kafkaesque "An Irrelevant Death" places an unexplained corpse in the apartment of A- who must then decide how to dispose of it without suspicion. In another story that recalls Kafka, "Dendrocacalia," a man named Common experiences an unexpected metamorphosis into a rare and sought-after plant. Try the local library or used book shop.

Beyond the Curve, Kōbō Abe Collection of fiction which explores many of modern man's dilemmas in an insightful, yet highly surrealistic style. Abe is one of the most highly regarded writers in Japan today.

Beyond the Curve book. Kobo Abe is so surreal in his writing! This book is such a good read. Like many modern Japanese stories, these feature mental anguish and alienation. Many of the characters are men living alone, friendless and disconnected from society, confronting inner demons and suffering the terrors of their minds. Some stories involve magical realism. Abe puts your mind in the Twilight Zone and makes no apologies.

A writer of ideas and a creator of striking images, Abe writes more from the head than the heart. A stimulating but eventually sterile road. A short-fiction collection from the noted Japanese author Abe (Woman in the Dunes, The Ark Sakura, et. -pieces whose originality is sometimes overwhelmed by their relentless surrealism. All the stories depend on a similar premise: a seemingly commonplace situation that increasingly becomes menacing and surreal. In the title story, a man suddenly becomes amnesiac on his way home, just before the curve on the road.

Secret Rendezvous: Kobo Abe - more awesome crazy Japanese literature! .

Designer: John Gall Designer: Ned Drew via book cover book book cover cover covering. Beyond the Curve: A collection of works including such stories as "An irrelevant death," "The dream soldier," "Dendrocalia," "The special envoy," and "The crime of S. Beyond the curve.

Book cover series design for Vintage Books, Designed in collaboration with Ned . Japanese Poster: Kobo Abe - The Double of Human Being. 2009 Gurafiku: Japanese Graphic Design.

Book cover series design for Vintage Books, Designed in collaboration with Ned Drew - John Gall. Yi Zhong. What others are saying.

by. series The University of Sheffield/Routledge Japanese Studies Series. Books related to Representing the Other in Modern Japanese Literature.

Fiction & Literature. by. Manga and the Representation of Japanese History. Japan Through the Looking Glass.

Abe Kōbō, Japanese novelist and playwright noted for his use of bizarre and allegorical situations to underline the isolation of the individual. He grew up in Mukden (now Shenyang), in Manchuria, where his father, a physician, taught at the medical college. In middle school his strongest subject. Abe formed the Abe Kōbō Studio, a theatrical company, in 1973. He regularly wrote one or two plays a year for the company and served as its director. The best-known of his plays, Tomodachi (1967; Friends), was performed in the United States and France. In theatre, as well as in the novel, he stood for the avant-garde and experimental.

Kobo Abe, Japanese author. Recipient Post-war Literature prize, 1950, 25th Akutagawa prize, 1951, Kishida prize, 1958, Yomiuri Literature prize, 1962, Tanizaki prize, 1967, Yomiuri Literature prize, 1975. 11920/?tag prabook0b-20.

A collection of works including such stories as "An Irrelevant Death," "The Dream Soldier," "Dendrocalia," "The Special Envoy," and "The Crime of S. Karma"
Comments: (7)
Sinredeemer
KA is best known as a novelist, but his short fiction, here in "BTC" is quite engaging. It's too bad this book is not more widely available. Kafka is a strong influence throughout - somewhat shamelessly at times, but who cares: good writing is good writing. 'Intruders' is the best in the collection, about a strange family that knocks on a man's apartment door in the middle of the night and proceeds to take over his apartment and life, making him into a sort of servant. In the opening story, a man comes home to find a corpse in his bed. His decision making is engaging. A few of the stories are duds, but that's generally the case. Worth the time, if you like KA's novels, and Japanese fiction, especially Murakami, who was clearly influenced by KA.
Kagda
My fourth copy. The other three were loaned to friends and were never seen again.
I especially love the true story of "Noah's Arc".
Dead Samurai
Great short stories from Japan; kind of a cross between Stephen King and Kafka. The author is perhaps best known for his “Woman in the Dunes.” Like many modern Japanese stories, these feature mental anguish and alienation. Many of the characters are men living alone, friendless and disconnected from society, confronting inner demons and suffering the terrors of their minds. Some stories involve magical realism.

In the title story, a man can’t bring himself to walk past a curve in the road to get home. Little by little he discovers he can no longer remember who he is or what he is doing. In another story, a man’s business card pirates his identity. (We’re all heard how important business cards are in Japanese culture). Another man comes home to find a dead body in his apartment and he tries to hide it rather than calling the police. Not a wise move.

In another story a man’s life is so futile that he lets himself be talked into becoming a tree to be taken care of, on display in an arboretum. Men in wartime return as ghosts, riding in the jeep in which they were killed. A poor poet’s mother weaves herself into a jacket to keep her son warm. A boisterous multi-generational family take over a man’s apartment and turns him into their slave. An architect is hired to design a bizarre internally-disconnected building for a modern corporation. Two men terrorize passengers overnight in a semi-deserted train station in a cat-and-mouse game: which one is the escaped mental patient and which one is the guard trying to bring him in? Stories you will remember.
Loni
This collection of short stories, translated from the Japanese by Juliet Winters Carpenter, is a surreal foray into the illogical and improbable. Kobo Abe is the kind of writer who reminds one of other writers. His Kafkaesque "An Irrelevant Death" places an unexplained corpse in the apartment of A- who must then decide how to dispose of it without suspicion. In another story that recalls Kafka, "Dendrocacalia," a man named Common experiences an unexpected metamorphosis into a rare and sought-after plant. But not all stories evoke Kafka. "The Life of a Poet" embraces the lyrical mythology of Latin American magic realism as a crone is accidentally made into thread and a deadly snow falls made of "crystalline dreams, souls, and desires." Lewis Carroll's convoluted logic surfaces in "The Bet" when an architect for a particular demanding advertising company discovers a world of small doors, head-shaking conversations, and stairs that lead not to an expected succession of floors but instead to places governed by a red light and adages. The bizarre building teaches the architect the logic of the illogical. When he designs "the path of the president's office as a mathematical function of the System," he resolves the story in an entirely fitting way.
Despite the derivative feel to these stories, they are distinctly Abe's. His Japanese sensibilities give them a different twist, for while Kafka chose to change his character into a cockroach, Abe chooses instead to transform his bewildered character into a scrubby plant that grows at high altitudes and which would be quite at home in a government funded hothouse. The author's confidence in the wildness of his imagination gives these stories an authority of voice, allowing for the needed suspension of disbelief. Abe's fictional realm is a difficult one to leave.
It took me a couple of stories to fully appreciate Abe's talents, but I'm glad I continued reading. Readers of Japanese and international fiction should most definitely take a look at Abe's work. Don't expect realism - or anything close to it - because Kobo Abe's fiction exists on another plane.
Leceri
This collection of short stories by Kobo Abe was a challenge for me. I don't generally enjoy short stories that much, and my interest in surrealism is limited. Still, I found them compelling despite the tendency toward studies in frustration. "Intruders" was especially so, with the protagonist powerless against those taking over first his apartment, then his livelihood, and finally his life. My favorite story was "Beguiled," where in a confrontation between two men, one is the pursuer, the other the pursued . . . but which is which? This book was translated from Japanese, and although some of the phrasing seems awkward at times, it actually enhances the overall surrealism of Abe's writing. Definitely worth reading, but only worth full price if this is your favorite genre. Try the local library or used book shop.
in waiting
Beyond the Curve by Kobo Abe is one of the best compilations of short stories I've read. His style is like a blend of Rod Serling, Stephen King and Salvador Dali. Each tale is strange and unique and tests the limits of your imagination. As much as I like his other books, this one is my favorite because it runs the gamut of his storytelling style from novels like Woman in the Dunes to the outrageously surreal Kangaroo Notebook. If you haven't read any of Abe's work, Beyond the Curve is a great introduction.