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by Nikolai Leskov,Richard Pevear,Larissa Volokhonsky

eBook The Enchanted Wanderer: and Other Stories download ISBN: 0307268829
Author: Nikolai Leskov,Richard Pevear,Larissa Volokhonsky
Publisher: Knopf; Translation edition (March 26, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 608
ePub: 1627 kb
Fb2: 1282 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: docx lit azw doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Short Stories and Anthologies

Together, Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky have translated works by Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov .

Together, Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky have translated works by Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Gogol, Bulgakov, and Pasternak. They were twice awarded the h Club Translation Prize (for their versions of Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov and Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina), and their translation of Dostoevsky’s Demons was one of three nominees for the same prize. They are married and live in France. I enjoyed the Enchanted Wanderer the best but all the short stories (short novellas) were good and worth reading I found they were often the right length to read before bed. I highly recommend this work.

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky (Russian: Лариса Волохонская, RU) are literary translators best known for their collaborative English translations of classic Russian literature. Individually, Pevear has also translated into English works from French, Italian, and Greek. The couple's collaborative translations have been nominated three times and twice won the h Club Translation Prize (for Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov)

A few days later, Chekhov writes to his brother, Alexander: Leikin brought along with him my favourite writer, NS Leskov

A few days later, Chekhov writes to his brother, Alexander: Leikin brought along with him my favourite writer, NS Leskov. He came over to our place; he came with me to the Salon and to the Sobolev Lane dens of vic. e turned to me, half drunk, and asked: ‘Do you know who I am?’ ‘Yes, I do’.

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. Other Books by This Author. Other author's books: The Enchanted Wanderer and Other Stories. pages ; cm. Includes bibliographical references. eISBN: 978-0-307-96236-2. I. Pevear, Richard,, translator. II. Volokhonsky, Larissa, translator. Leskov is a writer who yields enormous pleasure, breaking past sectarian literary and ideological premises. The Enchanted Wanderer. Nikolai Leskov, a younger contemporary of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy and one of the great masters of Russian fiction, is a writer who keeps being discovered

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. Nikolai Leskov, a younger contemporary of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy and one of the great masters of Russian fiction, is a writer who keeps being discovered. The first to discover him was Leskov himself. He was in his late twenties and working as a business agent for his uncle, a Russianized Scotsman named Alexander Scott, whose firm managed the vast estates of two noble Russian families. Leskov later described those years, from 1857 to 1859, as the best period of his life.

The enchanted wanderer. by Nikolai Leskov & translated by Richard Pevear ; Larissa Volokhonsky. Age Range: 1831 - 1895.

In stories long considered classics, Leskov takes the speech patterns of oral storytelling and spins them in new . Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

In stories long considered classics, Leskov takes the speech patterns of oral storytelling and spins them in new and startlingly modern ways, presenting seemingly artless yarns that are in fact highly sophisticated. It is the great gift of this new translation that it allows us to hear the many vibrant voices of Leskov's singular art. Język: english. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Free ebooks since 2009.

The titular story, The Enchanted Wanderer, is the longest and the most entertaining. It reminded me somewhat of Voltaire's Candide, but a tamed down version. This book was different from other Russian novels I've read because instead of focusing on the aristocracy, the stories focus on the working class. Highly recommended to anyone who enjoys Russian literature. I read the Ebook version, translated by Richard Peaver and Larissa Volokhonsky, and it contains the following short stories: The Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk: not the best of Leskov's stories, but a nice start nonetheless. The Sealed Angel: truly amazing!

As Richard Pevear points out in the introduction to The Enchanted Wanderer - a collection of 17 stories vibrantly translated by Pevear and Larissa ­Volokhonsky - this has happened at least three times

As Richard Pevear points out in the introduction to The Enchanted Wanderer - a collection of 17 stories vibrantly translated by Pevear and Larissa ­Volokhonsky - this has happened at least three times. The first rediscovery took place during Leskov’s own lifetime: in the 1880s, after he had suffered for years an almost total critical neglect, the young Chekhov hailed his oeuvre, declaring him a mixture of an elegant Frenchman and a defrocked priest.

The award-winning translators of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, and Gogol now bring us a Russian writer ripe for rediscovery, whose earthy and exuberant stories, famous in his own country, have never before been adequately translated into English. Leskov was Chekhov’s favorite writer and was greatly admired by Tolstoy and Maxim Gorky. His short stories—innovative in form, richly playful in language, now tragic, now satirical, now wildly comic in subject matter—exploded the prevailing traditions of nineteenth-century Russian fiction and paved the way for such famous literary successors as Mikhail Bulgakov. These seventeen stories are visionary and fantastic, and yet always grounded in reality, peopled by outsized characters that include serfs, princes, military officers, Gypsy girls, wayward monks, horse dealers, nomadic Tartars, and, above all, the ubiquitous figure of the garrulous, enthralling, not entirely trustworthy storyteller.In stories long considered classics, Leskov takes the speech patterns of oral storytelling and spins them in new and startlingly modern ways, presenting seemingly artless yarns that are in fact highly sophisticated. It is the great gift of this new translation that it allows us to hear the many vibrant voices of Leskov’s singular art. 

Comments: (7)
Cogelv
A very good collection, another great translation by P & V. I read the kindle version and had no problems, the translators put in a lot of footnotes, so if you are not up on Russian cultural practices or slept thru Sunday school, this will help out (also the Shakespeare references). What I found interesting was the authors reference to Varus and the Teutoburg forest, I think it might say something about our current education system when this author expected his readers to catch the reference. I enjoyed the Enchanted Wanderer the best but all the short stories (short novellas) were good and worth reading I found they were often the right length to read before bed. I highly recommend this work.
Not-the-Same
I was only recently made aware of Leskov. A contemporary of the "Big Three" Russian writers -- Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Turgenev -- and cited as an influence by Chekhov, Leskov remains little known outside of academia, yet this collection demonstrates that his work deserves a place amongst the true greats of Russian literature.

Leskov has been described as a Russian Mark Twain, and I think this is true to some extent. His flair for anecdote, dry sense of humor, and knack for capturing everyday speech all invite such a comparison, and his stories are as quintessentially Russian as Clemens's are American. But while Clemens seems to focus his insights primarily on the social issues of his time, Leskov takes a more philosophical approach, inviting his readers to reflect on larger questions of human existence.

The seventeen (!) stories in this volume take the reader on a whirlwind tour of 19th century Russian life, touching on topics such as the place of women in Russian society, the power of religious belief, the effects of serfdom on the serfs and their masters, the nature of spirits, and, above all, the question of what truly defines a Russian man or woman. The stories are told with honesty and compassion, taking an unflinching look at some of the darker aspects of Russian society, yet always managing to capture the incredible resilience of the human spirit and the power of good against the evils in life. But there are few places where Leskov explicitly makes clear his opinions, preferring instead to let the reader glean what they may from the stories themselves. These are true icebergs of stories, concealing at least as much beneath the surface as is immediately visible. This is not to say a casual reader won't enjoy these stories -- in fact, they are incredibly readable and enjoyable -- but for those who like to dig deeper there is much to find here.

Stylistically, Leskov is tremendously original and engaging, even in translation. Many of the stories are structured in a deliberately un-literary way, more like someone recounting a tale out loud than a written work. (Indeed, several of the stories are framed by just such a storytelling context.) This gives the stories a certain unpredictability and excitement, leaving the reader never certain of where the narrative is going to go next.

The collection contains the following short stories and novellas: The Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, The Sealed Angel, The Enchanted Wanderer, Singlemind, The Devil-Chase, Deathless Golovan, The White Eagle, A Flaming Patriot, Lefty, The Spirit of Madame de Genlis, The Toupee Artist, The Voice of Nature, A Little Mistake, The Pearl Necklace, The Spook, The Man on Watch, and A Robbery.

A note on the translation. Some have compared Pevear and Volokhonsky's translations of some of the stories unfavorably with others available, but not having read the alternatives I can't comment. I will say that in comparison to other translations by P&V, this one seems a little less polished, but it makes up for it by the number and variety of stories contained within this single volume. Well worth a read!
Kinashand
I read a review in the TLS of two translations of Nickolai Levsky's The Enchanted Wanderer. The Enchanted Wanderer: and Other Stories (The TLS review was written A. N. Wilson and entitled "Chekhov's less famous master." It appeared in the 15 May 2013 issue. you can easily find it for free by googling this information.) I have to agree with the reviewer that the Ian Dreiblatt translation is far superior to Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky 's. The Dreiblatt translation is hilarious (when it is supposed to be hilarious). The Enchanted Wanderer (The Art of the Novella) The humor and general rawness and immediacy of Dreiblatt's rendering does just not come across in P and V's rather stilted rendering. Dreiblatt knows how to use the same word to set up a joke. See the repetition of "fake" passport in chapter five, for example. Dreiblatt sets up "fake" as the punchline ("it's just that it was fake"). Peaver and V first use "illegal" and then "false," totally spoiling the effect. And whoever heard of a "false" passport? "Fake" is clearly the correct word. Similar examples could easily be multiplied. I am happy to have both translation as the the P and V is not only a handsome and inexpensive hardcover but contains many other wonderful stories and novellas by Leskov as well. I am baffled by the relative poverty of imagination in the P and V translation. I am amazed by the amount of effort and energy that went into their translation, and I am grateful that they did it. Both are obviously brilliant scholars. Somehow, they don't seem to have an ear for English, or at least not for the kind of English that would best suit Leskov..
Getaianne
Leskov is a writer not to be missed. His story "A Lady Macbeth of the District of Mtsensk" provided the rudimentary basis for the libretto of Dmitri Shostakovich's opera of the same name. It's fascinating to discover the story behind the opera, plus many more compelling stories by this author, including the spectacular "The Sealed Angel," a miraculous story about a wandering group of "Old Believers" at a time of a schism in the Russian Orthodox Church following the ascendancy of Peter the Great.
Corgustari
As with most short story collections I really enjoyed some of the stories, but found some of them to be a bit boring. I thought the translators did a great job because I really enjoyed the writing, and Leskov is known to be somewhat difficult to translate. I definitely would recommend this to fans of classic Russian literature. Also this edition is just really pretty :)