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eBook Love and Longing in Bombay download

by Vikram Chandra

eBook Love and Longing in Bombay download ISBN: 0140265724
Author: Vikram Chandra
Publisher: Penguin Books (August 30, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1345 kb
Fb2: 1292 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: docx lit azw rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Short Stories and Anthologies

Home Vikram Chandra Love and Longing in Bombay

Home Vikram Chandra Love and Longing in Bombay. Love and Longing in Bombay, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26. Love and Longing in Bombay. It had been with him from long ago, this leap, and he knew where it took him, but this night a pain grew in that part of him that he no longer had, and he tried to fight it away, imagining the rush of air against his neck, the flapping of his clothes, the complete darkness, but it was no use. He was still awake.

I bought Vikram Chandra’s Love and Longing in Bombay (1997) after coming across raves for his later novel Sacred Games (2007)

I bought Vikram Chandra’s Love and Longing in Bombay (1997) after coming across raves for his later novel Sacred Games (2007). Chandra’s deep dive into Mumbai’s underworld attracted me, but was I ready for a 992-page epic? I decided to begin with this 268-page collection of long stories and short novellas about Mumbai when it was called Bombay. Sentence by sentence, Chandra is a prose master. Everything he writes is a pleasure to read but in his quest to avoid stating the obvious he often lost me as his convoluted, evanescent plots unwound.

This was pretty thin, but insignificant enough not to detract. The five stories were mixed and somewhat eclectic. Each story has a title attributed with a Hindu concept (sort of based on Purusartha), loosely described below with each story.

It’s that slow descent into the dusk that oppresses me, that endless end with its under-taste of death. Not so long ago, one Sunday evening, I flipped the television off and on a dozen times, walked. around my room three times, sat on the floor and tried to read a thriller, switched on the television again, and the relentless chatty joyousness finally drove me out of the house. I walked aimlessly through the streets, listening to the long echoes of children’s games, tormented by a nostalgia that settled lightly over me.

Vikram Chandra's keenly anticipated new novel is a magnificent story of friendship and betrayal, of terrible violence, of an astonishing modern city and its dark side. 123. Published: 2008. 106. Published: 2011. Red Earth and Pouring Rain.

Vikram Chandra (born 1961 in India) is an Indian-American writer. His first novel, Red Earth and Pouring Rain, won the 1996 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best First Book. Chandra was born in New Delhi in 1961

Vikram Chandra (born 1961 in India) is an Indian-American writer. Chandra was born in New Delhi in 1961. His father Navin Chandra was a business executive who is now retired. His mother Kamna Chandra has written several Hindi films and plays. Her most notable works include the films Prem Rog (1982), 1942: A Love Story (1994), Chandni, directed by Yash Chopra and Qarib Qarib Singlle (2017)

Love and Longing in Bombay. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Love and Longing in Bombay. From the acclaimed author of 'Red Earth and Pouring Rain', this is a collection of interconnected stories set in contemporary India.

However while reading Love and Longing in Bombay, the city itself didn't strike as particularly important. Vikram Chandra is a remarkable, startling and very welcome exception. Mr. Chandra is a marvelous storyteller

However while reading Love and Longing in Bombay, the city itself didn't strike as particularly important. you'd be hard pressed to assign them any sort of archetype. Can't wait for his next piece. Chandra is a marvelous storyteller. This matters, because telling a good story, not cleverness and fireworks, is what fiction is about.

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Vikram Chandra is the author of Geek Sublime, Sacred Games (now a Netflix series), Love and Longing in Bombay, and . Vikram Chandra’s first novel, Red Earth and Pouring Rain, was published in 1995

Vikram Chandra is the author of Geek Sublime, Sacred Games (now a Netflix series), Love and Longing in Bombay, and Red Earth and Pouring Rain. Vikram Chandra’s first novel, Red Earth and Pouring Rain, was published in 1995. The book won the Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best First Book and the David. Higham Prize for Fiction. His collection of short stories, Love and Longing in Bombay, was published in 1997. Love and Longing in Bombay won the Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best Book (Eurasia region) and was short-listed for the Guardian Fiction Prize.

A civil servant narrates six stories to the patrons of a Bombay bar, tales of ghosts and soldiers, love and hate between families, and corruption in present-day India. By the author of Red Earth and Pouring Rain. Tour.
Comments: (7)
Blackseeker
I bought Vikram Chandra’s “Love and Longing in Bombay” (1997) after coming across raves for his later novel “Sacred Games” (2007). Chandra’s deep dive into Mumbai’s underworld attracted me, but was I ready for a 992-page epic? I decided to begin with this 268-page collection of long stories and short novellas about Mumbai when it was called Bombay.
Sentence by sentence, Chandra is a prose master. Everything he writes is a pleasure to read but in his quest to avoid stating the obvious he often lost me as his convoluted, evanescent plots unwound. The five stories in “Love and Longing” have one-word titles that are basic Hindu concepts connecting obliquely, if at all, to the stories’ content. For instance, it’s seemingly a fruitless quest, figuring out how “Shanti,” which means inner peace, is an appropriate title for a story about boy meets girl. Turns out near the end that the girl is named Shanti. Perhaps the name is appropriate after all, since the hero starts out feeling “as if he was gone from himself” but eventually achieves contentment.
The hero of “Kama” (which means longing) is an angsty detective named Sartaj with “the smell of hopelessness in my armpits.” As he pursues a murder investigation down the highways and byways of the seedy side of Mumbai, “he could feel its huge life and all its unsolved dead.” After reading all these stories, Chandra’s readers might feel that their guide to Bombay is instead leading them on a blindfold tour of the city’s tortured psyches.
Dibei
Love and Longing in Bombay: Stories
This book was the one that introduced me to the gifted Vikram Chandra who I had never heard of. I was favorably impressed by his turn of the prhrase in these marvelous short stories that all come together at the end. I highly recommend it to anyone who likes short stories. This is set in India in the past (early to mid 20th century, I believe), and I have discovered a new love for reading books about India through this book. Buy it. You won't be disappointed. I've since bought other books by Vikram Chandra and he's a great author. You won't be disappointed.
Visonima
Between 1925 and 1965, the force of Ernest Hemingway's prose ravaged two generations of American writers by seducing them into pathetic imitation of the inimitable. In India, over the past twenty years, the success of Salman Rushdie's writing (all surface brilliance, not-so-magical-realism, and an underlying condescension toward all living things other than the author) has corrupted the style of far too many Indian writers--faced with a dynamic reality to equal any on earth, they slip into silliness, excess and metaphor. Vikram Chandra is a remarkable, startling and very welcome exception. Mr. Chandra is a marvelous storyteller. This matters, because telling a good story, not cleverness and fireworks, is what fiction is about. Writing in the handsome, clean prose that seems effortless to non-writers (while arousing jealousy in fellow writers), Chandra seduces the reader quickly and doesn't break the spell until the last page of his tales. These novellas of life in Bombay from the Independence era to the hi-tech age have the old-fashioned ability to make the reader neglect other matters until he or she finds out what happened. Unlike Mr. Rushdie, whose main characters never seem more than sly intellectual constructs, Mr. Chandra's characters live for us. We CARE about their fates. We believe that they are real. Their wounds are, faintly at least, our own. I recommend this to any lover of good fiction, and I look forward to future volumes from this wonderful, dauntingly-talented author.
Raelin
The language is flashy and original, but the old-fashioned skills are lacking: the author does not create fully engaging characters, and the plots are weak. Nor, oddly, does he convey the feeling and atmosphere of Bombay. The female characters, especially, are cardboard cutouts -- the lady in the long sex scene is almost a soft-core parody.
Danial
Many of the other reviews seem to concentrate on the fact that these stories take place in Bombay...and now that I think about it, I see why...

However while reading Love and Longing in Bombay, the city itself didn't strike as particularly important...as one reviewer notes, this could've been any city in the world.

What I liked best about the title were the characters themselves, stunningly unique...you'd be hard pressed to assign them any sort of archetype.

Also, Chandra's writing makes this book worth reading, verbose but it all seems so necessary in context...I love this stuff. Can't wait for his next piece.
unmasked
I read these characters sometime ago. The five chapters "Dharma", "Shakti", "Kama", "Artha" and "Shanti" seemed reasonable means of understanding the authors work. I vaguley remember the story except for the fact that an old man was narrating these stories in a corner of a room or hotel. It is quite a lot about Bombay. One thing for sure, while reading these stories, they do catch your attention. But the endings of these stories were some what disappointing.
grand star
Just another testimony to the brilliance of Chandra, he draws you into his stories, carries you along for the ride and allows you a tast of the culture and environment of India, excellent book
good.