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by Osip Mandelstam,Christian Wiman

eBook Stolen Air: Selected Poems of Osip Mandelstam download ISBN: 0062099426
Author: Osip Mandelstam,Christian Wiman
Publisher: Ecco; Original edition (March 27, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 128
ePub: 1732 kb
Fb2: 1892 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi mbr txt lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Poetry

A new selection and translation of the work of Osip Mandelstam, perhaps. Post - reading thoughts: is this what perfection STOLEN AIR: Selected Poems of Osip Mandelstam, translated from the Russian by Christian Wiman with contributions and Introduction by Ilya Kaminsky, 2012 by Ecco. You're one person when you pick up a book, and when you finish, you're quite another. That's definitely how this one struck me.

Stolen Air spans Mandelstam's entire poetic career, from his early highly formal poems in which he reacted . Now we have Christian Wiman and Ilya Kaminsky's magnificent Stolen Air: Selected Poems of Osip Mandelstam.

Stolen Air spans Mandelstam's entire poetic career, from his early highly formal poems in which he reacted against Russian Symbolism to the poems of anguish and defiant abundance written in exile, when Mandelstam became a truly great poet. Aside from the famous early poems, which have a sharp new vitality in Wiman's versions, Stolen Air includes large selections from The Moscow Notebooks and The Voronezh Notebooks.

Osip Emilyevich Mandelstam (Russian: О́сип Эми́льевич Мандельшта́м, IPA: ; 14 January 1891 – 27 December 1938) was a Russian and Soviet poet and essayist of Jewish origin

Osip Emilyevich Mandelstam (Russian: О́сип Эми́льевич Мандельшта́м, IPA: ; 14 January 1891 – 27 December 1938) was a Russian and Soviet poet and essayist of Jewish origin. He was the husband of Nadezhda Mandelstam and one of the foremost members of the Acmeist school of poets. He was arrested by Joseph Stalin's government during the repression of the 1930s and sent into internal exile with his wife Nadezhda.

Osip Mandelshtam (1891- 1938), one of the three great Acmeist poets, wrote verse distinguished by classical restraint, majestic conciseness, and sonority. Much of his early poetry is embodied in his two collections Stone (1913) and Tristina (1922). Arrested in 1934, he was exiled first to the Ural region and then to Voronezh. In 1938 he was rearrested, sentenced to forced labour, and died in harrowing circumstances in Vladivostok. From "The Heritage of Russian Verse," by Dimitri Obolensky.

Osip Mandelstam was a popular russian poet. He was one of the foremost members of the Acmeist school of poets. Mandelstam's poetry, acutely populist in spirit after the first Russian revolution in 1905, became closely associated with symbolist imagery. In 1911, he and several other young Russian poets formed the Poets' Guild. Here are below some of his most famous poems ever written during his lifetime. Browse all poems and texts published on Osip Mandelstam. He published his first collection of poems, The Stone, in 1913. Osip Mandelstam Poems.

Osip Mandelstam ranks among the most significant Russian poets of the 20th century Osip Mandelstam: Poems, selected and translated by James Greene, forewords by Nadezhda Mandelstam and Donald Davie.

Osip Mandelstam ranks among the most significant Russian poets of the 20th century. With considerable guidance from the state, the press mounted a campaign against Mandelstam. Fearing that such allegations would result in his being banned from publishing, Mandelstam vehemently denied the charges. Osip Mandelstam: Poems, selected and translated by James Greene, forewords by Nadezhda Mandelstam and Donald Davie, Elek (London), 1980.

Two hundred sixty four poems by Osip Mandelshtam. Mandelstam’s father was a merchant, and his mother was born into the intelligentsia. He spent his youth in St. Petersburg, where he studied in a school of commerce and wrote his first verse. In 1907 he visited Paris and became enamored of the French Symbolists. In 1911 he studied at the University of Heidelberg and then the University of St. Petersburg, though he never graduated. Mandelstam is one of the truly outstanding Russian poets of his or any time, highly esteemed by such important writers as Nikolai Gumilyov, Anna Akhmatova, and Boris Pasternak.

Osip Mandelstam was born into a Jewish merchant family in Warsaw and later .

Osip Mandelstam was born into a Jewish merchant family in Warsaw and later moved to St. Petersburg where he received his secondary education at a prestigious school. He also studied at the Sorbonne and at Heidelberg University. He made his first steps as a poet in association with the Acmeist poets (Anna Akhmatova and Nikolay Gumilyov). For many intellectuals in Russia today, two poets - Osip Mandelstam (1891-1938) and Joseph Brodsky (1940-1996) - have acquired a nearly sacred status. Both are presented almost in the guise of Christian martyrs, as poets who suffered for their verse: One died at the hands of the authorities and the other was forced to emigrate.

The story of the poet Osip Mandelstam, who suffered continuous persecution under Stalin, but whose wife constantly supported both him and his writings until he died in 1938. Stolen Air: Selected Poems of Osip Mandelstam. by Osip Mandelstam · Christian Wiman. Hope Against Hope was first published in English in 1970. It is Nadezhda Mandelst. A new selection and translation of the work of Osip Mandelstam, perhaps the most important Russian poet of the twentieth century. Political nonconformist Osip Mandelstam's opposition to Stalin's totalitarian government made him a target of the communist st.

The Age by Osip Mandelstam. My age, my beast, is there anyone Who can peer into your eyes And with his own blood fuse Two centuries' worth of vertebrae? The creating blood gushes From the throat of earthly things, And the parasite just trembles On the threshold of new days. While the creature still has life, The spine must be delivered, While with the unseen backbone A wave distracts itself. Again they've brought the peak of life Like a sacrificial lamb, Like a child's supple cartilage- The age of infant earth.

Osip Mandelstam was perhaps the most important Russian poet of the nineteen-hundreds—a  crucial instigator of the “revolution of the word” that took place in early twentieth-century St. Petersburg and a political non-conformist who earned the enmity of Stalin and his totalitarian regime. With Stolen Air, Christian Wiman, editor of POETRY, America’s oldest and most prestigious magazine of verse, offers a new selection and translation of Mandelstam’s poetry—from his hard-edged and highly formal early poems to his almost savagely musical later works—for a new generation to be moved by, marvel at, and appreciate.
Comments: (7)
Xal
I have been reading the poems of Osip Mandelstam in translation since I first encountered him through Nadezhda Mandelstam's magnificent memoir, Hope Against Hope, in 1970. Many very fine poets have produced fine versions in English of the poems and prose of the most amazing Russian poet of modern times--one is tempted to say, certainly one of the most amazing poets, period. W.S. Merwin and Clarence Brown, James Green, Sidney Monas, Bernard Meares, and others have helped make him available to those of us with limited or no Russian.

Now we have Christian Wiman and Ilya Kaminsky's magnificent Stolen Air: Selected Poems of Osip Mandelstam. I do not mean in any way to denigrate the achievements of the other poets and translators, but only to say that Wiman and Kaminsky have created a truly great book, a work of power and poetry that brings Mandelstam to us (that in itself is a great achievement), offering him to us in the form of English poems that stand with the best of modern poetry--not just of translations (of which we are privileged in our time to have many that achieve greatness as translation--from Daniel Mendelsohn, John Ashbery, Richard Howard, to name only a few) but great poetry. For anyone who values Mandelstam, for anyone who cares at all about poetry, Wiman's volume is essential. Read it however you can, buy it if you can. You will treasure it.
Lcena
These translations are beautiful and memorable. I have no idea how faithful they are to the original. But the mind for images and sounds is definitely not missing. Its also good (though disturbing) to read some of Mandelstam's later poems, right before his untimely death at the hands of the criminally insane.
Berkohi
No comments.
Konetav
Gorgeous poetry ... and an exceptional translator to match. A must buy for anyone who appreciates poetry.
Diredefender
One of the best Russian poets, murdered for his muse
Ferne
Mandelstam is one of the greatest poets of the 20th century and, unfortunately, little known by general readers in the US. Among the virtues of this book is Ilya Kaminsky's introduction, which is not only informative, but lyrical and poetic itself. As other reviewers have noted, Wiman's poetry captures (I trust, not reading Russian) a muscular musical sound to Mandelstam's poetry that is lacking in other translations. I appreciate, for example, Wiman's assertive use of alliteration, assonance, and internal and slant rhyme. Some of the poems virtually punch one from the page. Among my favorites are "Bring Me To The Brink" ("The pain that sings in me does not sing, and is true") ; "Leningrad"; "Gown of Iron"; Faith ("Mother of maple, mother of snow"); "To Natasha Schtempel" ("Because the soul of brokenness is the soul") and the sublime poem "The Necklace." In the latter case, though, I find the translation by W.S. Merwin and Clarence Brown more forthright and simpler, in a positve way. Compare these two translations:

"Love, what's left for us, and of us, is this
Living remnant, loving revenant, brief kiss
Like a bee flying completed hiveless" (Wiman)

"For us, all that's left is kisses
tattered as the little bees
that die when they leave the hive" (Merwin)

Of course, this is purely subjective, but I find Merwin's translation, without the verbal tricks, more effective in capturing the melancholy sense of ending, with the bittersweet solace of love, than Wiman's.

Occasionally, Wiman's translations of Mandelstam (and Wiman is very upfront and honest that these are ultimately his poems, not Mandelstam's, because of the nature of translation) read too contemporary to me, too much like Wiman's own poetry or the poetry of Franz Wright.

Nevertheless, this is certainly a book that contemporary poets and readers of poetry should own.
Zolorn
Wiman has captured Mandelstam's voice and music brilliantly in his marvelously evocative translations of the works of one of the most challenging and important Russian poets. The collection spans the entirety of Mandelstam's career and includes many works not elsewhere translated.

As reviewed in Russian Life