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eBook Snow Water download

by Michael LONGLEY

eBook Snow Water download ISBN: 0224072579
Author: Michael LONGLEY
Publisher: Jonathan Cape; First Edition edition (2004)
Language: English
Pages: 80
ePub: 1185 kb
Fb2: 1928 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: docx lrf azw mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Poetry

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Michael Longley’s Snow Water follows his highly acclaimed The Weather in Japan to prove that he is one of the best nature poets in English: a poet who can rightly claim the paradoxically liquid crystal snow water as a metaphor for his own imagination.

Michael Longley, CBE (born 27 July 1939) is a poet from Belfast in Northern Ireland. He was succeeded in 2010 by Harry Clifton.

Michael Longley has received honorary degrees from Queen’s University Belfast, Trinity College Dublin, the Open University and University College Dublin

Michael Longley has received honorary degrees from Queen’s University Belfast, Trinity College Dublin, the Open University and University College Dublin. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of Aosdana. He was the winner of the American Ireland Fund Literary Award in 1996. In 2001 he received the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, and in 2003 the Wilfred Owen Award. He was awarded a CBE in 2010, and was the Ireland Professor of Poetry from 2007 to 2010.

Michael Longley's Snow Water follows his highly acclaimed The Weather in Japan to prove that he is one of the best nature poets in English: a poet who can rightly claim the paradoxically liquid crystal "snow water" as a metaphor for his own imagination. Yet, living in Northern Ireland, Michael Longley is a "nature poet turned into a war poet as if, He could cure death with the rub of a dock leaf," as he writes in "Edward Thomas's Poem.

The seashore poems reminded me a fair bit of Jean Sprackland I hadn’t heard of Michael Longley before picking this up at random from the library, but it sounds like he’s one of Northern Ireland’s premier poets. He’s been writing for at least 45 years. A lot of these poems allude to Greek mythology or to more modern patriotic myths of WWI.

Snow Water marks a decisive moment in Longley's poetic development - as decisive, perhaps, as that signalled by Gorse Fires. But it is a mixed book, where the genuinely original has not quite broken free from the overly mannered. But it is a mixed book, where the genuinely original has not quite broken free from the overly mannered

Michael Longley s Snow Water follows his highly acclaimed The Weather in Japan to prove that he is one of the best nature poets in English: a poet who can rightly claim the paradoxically liquid crystal snow water as a metaphor for his own imagination

Michael Longley s Snow Water follows his highly acclaimed The Weather in Japan to prove that he is one of the best nature poets in English: a poet who can rightly claim the paradoxically liquid crystal snow water as a metaphor for his own imagination. Yet, living in Northern Ireland, Michael Longley is a nature poet turned into a war poet as if, He could cure death with the rub of a dock leaf, as he writes in Edward Thomas s Poem.

Snow Water by Michael Longley. A fastidious brewer of tea a tea Connoisseur as well as a poet I modestly request on my sixtieth. Michael Longley (1939, Belfast, United Kingdom).

The poems collected in Snow Water find their gravity and centre in Michael Longley's adopted home in west Mayo, but range widely in their attention - from ancient Greece to Paris and Pisa, from Central Park to the trenches of the Somme.

Michael Longley‘s Snow Water follows his highly acclaimed The Weather in Japan to prove that he is one of the best nature poets in English: a poet who can rightly claim the paradoxically liquid crystal snow water as a metaphor for his own imagination. Yet, living in Northern Ireland, Michael Longley is a nature poet turned into a war poet as if, He could cure death with the rub of a dock leaf, as he writes in Edward Thomas’s Poem.