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eBook Dream Work download

by Mary Oliver

eBook Dream Work download ISBN: 0871130718
Author: Mary Oliver
Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press; 1st edition (1986)
Language: English
Pages: 90
ePub: 1901 kb
Fb2: 1654 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: azw lit lrf txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Poetry

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Dream Work, a collection of forty-five poems, follows both chronologically and logically Mary Oliver’s American Primitive.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Dream Work Quotes Showing 1-21 of 21. I wanted the past to go away, I wanted to leave it, like another country; I wanted my life to close, and open like a hinge, like a wing, like the part of the song where it falls down over the rocks: an explosion, a discovery; I wanted to hurry into the work of my life; I wanted to know, whoever I was, I was. alive for a little while. Mary Oliver, Dream Work. tags: change, life, living, past, poetry.

DREAM WORK BOOKS BY MARY OLIVER American Primitive Twelve Moons The River Styx, Ohio and Other Poems . The atlantic monthly press.

DREAM WORK BOOKS BY MARY OLIVER American Primitive Twelve Moons The River Styx, Ohio and Other Poems No Voyage and Other Poems CHAPBOOKS Sleeping in the Forest Th.

Dream Work, a collection of forty-five poems, follows both chronologically and logically Mary Oliver's American Primitive, which won for her the Pulitzer Prize for the finest book of poetry published in 1983 by an American poet. The depth and diversity of perceptual awareness-so steadfast and radiant in American Primitive-continue in Dream Work.

Mary Oliver was born and raised in Maple Hills Heights, a suburb of Cleveland, Ohio. She would retreat from a difficult home to the nearby woods, where she would build huts of sticks and grass and write poems. She attended both Ohio State University and Vassar College, but did not receive a degree from either institution.

Dream Work, a collection of forty-five poems, follows both chronologically and logically Mary Oliver's American Primitive, which won her the Pulitzer Prize for the finest book of poetry published in 1983 by an American poet

Dream Work, a collection of forty-five poems, follows both chronologically and logically Mary Oliver's American Primitive, which won her the Pulitzer Prize for the finest book of poetry published in 1983 by an American poet.

Dream Work Paperback – 7 January 1994. by Mary Oliver (Author). One of the astonishing aspects of work is the consistency of tone over this long period. Many come to Dream Work for the first time carried on the wings of the poem Wild Geese whose most famous lines read something like a benediction: You do not have to be good. You do not have to walk on your knees, for a hundred miles through the desert, repenting.

Much of Mary Oliver’s poetry has to do with walks she has taken in the woods, but there is always something else underneath-the idea that it is important to look at the world we live in to get an idea of who we are as humans within an ecosystem. Nature is central to Oliver’s idea of God. For those who don’t read a lot of Mary Oliver poems and would like to begin including it in their regular reading diet, treat this as a guide where to start. Her first collection, No Voyage and Other Poems, was published in 1963. She won the Pulitzer in 1984 for the collection American Primitive.

Dream Work, a collection of forty-five poems, follows Mary Oliver’s Pulitzer Prize-winning poetry volume American Primitive. The deep perceptual awareness on display in that collection is all the more radiant and steadfast here. With this new collection, Oliver has turned her attention to the solitary and difficult labors of the spirit–to accepting the truth about one’s personal world, and to valuing the triumphs while transcending the failures of human relationships. Open Road + Grove/Atlantic, 4 нояб.

Dream Work, a collection of forty-five poems, follows both chronologically and logically Mary Oliver’s American Primitive, which won her the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1983. The depth and diversity of perceptual awareness — so steadfast and radiant in American Primitive — continues in Dream Work. Additionally, she has turned her attention in these poems to the solitary and difficult labors of the spirit — to accepting the truth about one’s personal world, and to valuing the triumphs while transcending the failures of human relationships.
Comments: (7)
Justie
Many come to Dream Work for the first time carried on the wings of the poem “Wild Geese” whose most famous lines read something like a benediction: “You do not have to be good. / You do not have to walk on your knees / for a hundred miles through the desert, repenting. / You only have to let the soft animal of your body / love what it loves.” And if this is a reader’s first exposure to Oliver, they will be met with some her of most representative pieces. Many of the forty-five poems, like “Morning Poem” use nature—beautifully and physically rediscovered through Oliver’s imagery—to describe hope and self-compassion (“And if your spirit / carries within it / the thorn / that is heavier than lead-- / if it’s all you can do / to keep on trudging- / there is still / somewhere deep within you / a beast shouting that the earth / is exactly what it wanted—“).
Other poems explore darker themes, and use nature to cope with the transience of life (and the struggle to figure out what to do with it in the meantime). In the beginning of Part II, “One or Two Things” captures a life’s worth of anxiety about the passage of time, opening with “Don’t bother me. / I’ve just / been born.” and ending with the tranquil and perhaps a bit eerie stanza: “For years and years I struggled / just to love my life. And then / the butterfly / rose weightless, in the wind. / “Don’t love your life / too much,” it said, / and vanished / into the world.”
The central tension of the collection might best be captured in the first poem of the book. “Dogfish” introduces the speaker’s main struggle stating, “I wanted / the past to go away, I wanted / to leave it, like another country; I wanted / my life to close, and open / like a hinge, like a wing….I wanted / to hurry into the work of my life; I wanted to know, / whoever I was, I was / alive for a little while.” What carries through all of the pieces in Dream Works is an answering vision of self-exploration and meaning making through interaction with nature profoundly but simply rendered.
Coiril
classic, delicate, graceful. This is a great introduction to Mary Oliver's work. If you like Robert Frost, or T.S Elliot then maybe you are like me, and you will embrace "Dream Work." I bought a used copy from Amazon, and when it came, you could tell it was loved on...the first book I have bought with dog ears, markings, and a book mark...all in one very treasured copy.
Beabandis
This is one of my all-time favorite books of poetry! Mary Oliver is a wonderful poet; Wild Geese is especially great.
Corgustari
This was the first book of poems I ever read by this amazing poet. She is brilliant and has keen observations and contemplations about life. I am very satisfied with both the book and seller.
Buzalas
Like Emily Dickinson, they'll be reading Mary Oliver's Dream Work, 100 years from now.
Gralsa
All of Mary Oliver’s poetry is beautiful.
Ishnsius
I already have this wonderful collection by Mary Oliver. I ordered it as a gift for a friend who is fairly recently widowed and depressed. I made sure this book included "Wild Geese." My friend has expressed many thanks and has found deep solace.
This thoughtfully written book of poetry forces you to look deep within and to touch base with a sense of the Divine -- the language is evocative as poetic language should be. No sentimentality here but intensely self-examining.