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eBook Leaving (Phoenix Poets) download

by Laton Carter

eBook Leaving (Phoenix Poets) download ISBN: 0226095193
Author: Laton Carter
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (October 16, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 96
ePub: 1776 kb
Fb2: 1575 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf lit docx doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Poetry

The phoenix also symbolizes the faithful followers through the baptismal altar where the sinful self dies .

The phoenix also symbolizes the faithful followers through the baptismal altar where the sinful self dies and the new hope within Christ comes to life.

I saw a poem by Eugene, Oregon - based poet, Laton Carter, "The Geese," on the city bus and tracked down the collection at the library

I saw a poem by Eugene, Oregon - based poet, Laton Carter, "The Geese," on the city bus and tracked down the collection at the library. When it happened, I was in bed. Even though there was nothing to see, I opened my eyes, stared into darknesss.

My phoenix long ago secured His nest in sky-vault's cope; In the body's cage immured, He is weary of life's hope. Hafez (also known as Hafiz), born in the early fourteenth century, is one of the most celebrated Persian poets

My phoenix long ago secured His nest in sky-vault's cope; In the body's cage immured, He is weary of life's hope. Round and round this heap of ashes Now flies the bird amain, But in that odorous niche of heaven Nestles the bird again. Once flies he upward, he will perch On Tuba's golden bough: His home is on that fruited arch Which cools the blest below. Hafez (also known as Hafiz), born in the early fourteenth century, is one of the most celebrated Persian poets. Little is known about his life, but he is most widely known and lauded for his ghazals.

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I was a flailing phoenix Trapped underneath a waterfall Unable to rise from the ashes While being continuously extinguished Until you constructed a dam With the flotsam from my heart I opened my wings and emitted light Fearing.

I was a flailing phoenix Trapped underneath a waterfall Unable to rise from the ashes While being continuously extinguished Until you constructed a dam With the flotsam from my heart I opened my wings and emitted light Fearing waterfalls I took my fire flight I was elated to have migrated Where the weather was tropical And the conditions seemed optimal But your aggravating. Mythical Bird, show me your secret Hatch forth from your shell Plumage of orange and scarlet Emerge glorious from whence you dwell. Fiery Bird, you must reveal Your astounding, magical ways Where from these lives you steal Forever reincarnating well into your days.

A broad, square-jawed witch with very short grey hair sat on Fudges left .

A broad, square-jawed witch with very short grey hair sat on Fudges left; she wore a monocle and looked forbidding. On Fudges right was another witch, but she was sitting so far back on the bench that her face was in shadow. Very well,' said Fudge. A powerful emotion had risen in Harry's chest at the sight of Dumbledore, a fortified, hopeful feeling rather like that which phoenix song gave him. He wanted to catch Dumbledore's eye, but Dumbledore was not looking his way; he was continuing to look up at the obviously flustered Fudge. Ah,' said Fudge, who looked thoroughly disconcerted.

National Book Award for Poetry: Richard Wilbur, Things of this World. Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Things of This World by Richard Wilbur. Bollingen Prize: Allen Tate. a b c Bree, Germaine, Twentieth-Century French Literature, translated by Louise Guiney, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1983.

Book is in Like New, near Mint Condition. POTENTIAL STRANGER (PHOENIX POETS) By Killarney Clary Mint Condition . Will include dust jacket if it originally came with one. Text will be unmarked and pages crisp. Ochre leaves quivered I tested my cream kid slippers To tell you A truck pulled up We bent for potsherds No one promised If I could gather silence Barely light, still an arch of shine His body is a pendulum The last sure thing He tied his ankle Confetti lifts over the fairground Into the land of youth I dove to where there.

Whether charting the moments before or after work, the unspoken emotions accompanying separation and reunion, or the necessity of a grocery store as a "last place" for people to engage publicly, Laton Carter's poems attend to the parts of our lives that are easiest to ignore, like solitary highway drivers passing in their cars and the unspoken link binding people together. In poem after poem, the speaker relentlessly pulls the reader to spaces, both physical and emotional—fearful of the inability to bridge the gap between ideas, places, and individuals, yet unable to avoid trying. Mining the territory of responsibility and longing, these poems remind us that the minutiae and variation in our private lives combine to serve up a larger public identity. An impressively mature first collection of poems, Leaving is a bold book that eschews the superfluous, leaving only that which is most essential and meaningful.
Comments: (5)
Rrd
It was not a surprise to me when I heard that the author recently won the 2005 Oregon Book Award in Poetry. In a field full of melodrama and copycats of style and substance, Laton's work stands out as both truthful and original. It is also very well crafted.

"Leaving" is a serious work with great insight into the world around us. And yet, testament to the fullness of the work are the moments where humor broke through to have me laugh out loud. Very well done Mr. Carter...
Faugami
Laton Carter's poetry brings a sacred flavor to the mundane. His poems address the most daily of objects and events (working in a cubicle, the highway "Lottery" billboard) through a thoughtful lens that made me as a reader see to a deeper level where things are more connected than they appear. His reflections on the experience of being unemployed were especially poignant to me. His attention to detail, honesty, and compassion make this collection very accessible and readable.
Lightseeker
Laton Carter's poetry works on many levels. To see his work as solely about relationships or finding beauty in the mundane is to give it short-shrift. Viewing the collection as a whole allows the reader to see complex, extended metaphors. Bird imagery and symbols are present in many of his poems. Often, the static nature of his "characters" or speakers are contrasted with the freedom of birds. I found this to be entertaining.
Just_paw
Laton Carter's work constantly inspires me. Reading this collection of poems makes me look at my everyday life in new ways. His work reminds me to think about the possibilities that are all around us in the most common situations. "Leaving" inspired me to title my latest CD "The Is " after a line in his poem "Getting Lost." I'm sure after reading this soulful and enjoyable book you will be inspired and refreshed as well.
Saithinin
[...]
Carter's work speaks tomes on the intricacy, complexity, and intrigue of the human condition. It's hard reading, but rich reading. If you haven't the time, inclination, or, frankly, ability to invest in such a work you're probably better off sticking to periodicals.