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eBook The Art of Loss: Poems by Myrna Stone download

by Myrna Stone

eBook The Art of Loss: Poems by Myrna Stone download ISBN: 0870135805
Author: Myrna Stone
Publisher: Michigan State University Press; 1st Edition edition (May 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 104
ePub: 1736 kb
Fb2: 1746 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: txt rtf docx lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Poetry

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The Art of Loss book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Myrna Stone (Goodreads Author).

In her debut collection, Myrna Stone catalogues the losses that accrue over time . Recklessly formal and daringly casual, Myrna Stone’s poems set page after page aglow with amplitude of feeling and vibrancy of detail.

In her debut collection, Myrna Stone catalogues the losses that accrue over time and the ways in which we deal with these losses: the loss of loved ones; of faith; of innocence-losses of both a personal, and of a larger, historical nature-losses that simultaneously deplete and elevate. In her first book, with considerable grace and fine, lovely detail, Stone evokes her family’s world and the larger world around it, while telling stories of our perpetual waste and repair.

The title of this collection states the central themethe losses that accrue over time and the ways in which this particular poetic persona deals with these losses: the loss of loved ones; of faith; of innocencelosses of both a personal, and of a larger, historical naturelosses that simultaneously deplete and elevate.

Myrna Stone is the author of five full-length books of poems: Luz Bones (Etruscan, 2017), In the Present Tense . Browser Books Publishing, 2007); and The Art of Loss (Michigan State University Press, 2001).

Myrna Stone is the author of five full-length books of poems: Luz Bones (Etruscan, 2017), In the Present Tense, Portraits of My Father (Kelsay Books, White Violet Press, 2013); The Casanova Chronicles (Etruscan Press, 2010), which was a finalist for the 2011 Ohioana Book of the Year Award in Poetry; How Else to Love the World (Browser Books Publishing, 2007); and The Art of Loss (Michigan State University Press, 2001).

St. Mary's Memorial Hospital, Sherbrooke, Nova Scotia.

This is the third book by Myrna Stone, from Greenville, Ohio, who is emerging as a powerful new voice in contemporary poetry. She reveals a vast, rich vocabulary and, especially in this book, a fluent command of various forms, from the sonnet to the triolet to the sestina.

In Luz Bones, a collection of wild, intense, and fiercely-crafted sonnets and other poems, Myrna Stone takes us on a journey through time and the psyche, that is both novelistic and deeply lyrical. The range of voices-from Martin Luther's to Mae West's-explores both mortality and what might lie beyond it. Myrna Stone is the author of five books of poetry, including In the Present Tense: Portraits of My Father, which was a finalist for the 2014 Ohioana Book Award in Poetry. She has received two Ohio Arts Council Grants, and the 2001 Ohio Poet of the Year Award

Myrna Stone, in How Else to Love the World, seems to ask what can redeem "the addle and dross the hours . Myrna Stone is the author of HOW ELSE TO LOVE THE WORLD, The Art of Loss, and THE CASANOVA CHRONICLES.

Myrna Stone, in How Else to Love the World, seems to ask what can redeem "the addle and dross the hours devise" (her fine phrase from the title poem). One answer the book provides is "this carnal life," whether manifested in human touch or on painted canvas ("stroke of flesh and brush"). The scenes depicted may be tawdry or elegant, voluptuous or corrupt, but Stone's writing is always crisp with precision and civility. Her forms are as diverse as the painters she calls up, from Bruegel to John Singer Sargent. Reading Stone, I think of John Donne.

Browse through Ruth Stone's poems and quotes. 37 poems of Ruth Stone. Still I Rise, The Road Not Taken, If You Forget Me, Dreams, Annabel Lee. an American poet, author, and teacher. For twenty years she traveled the US, teaching creative writing at many universities, including the University of Illinois, University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, University of California Davis, Brandeis, and finally settling at State University of New York Binghamton. She died at her home in Ripton, Vermont on November 19, 2011.

Recommended for you. Mirna - Stone Throne. First of all, I don't want to even imagine how cold it would be to sit on a stone throne, or chair. I like this pose, although I don't much like her hair streak. 12. 0. 178 (1 Today). By AkaneCeles. Watch. Published: July 6, 2007. Visual Art Original Work Traditional. I love her dress, and it's another of the dresses I really wanna own. Although, I might change some of the colors out. Prismacolor markers, sharpie markers, and waterproof black ink pen. ~~ ~~ (Shan-chan . .

The title of this collection states the central theme―the losses that accrue over time and the ways in which this particular poetic persona deals with these losses: the loss of loved ones; of faith; of innocence―losses of both a personal, and of a larger, historical nature―losses that simultaneously deplete and elevate. These poems argue that memory is the servant of time, and that the work of memory is "a construct of mirror and shadow" transforming and distilling events until they achieve the status of myth ("Simulacrum"). Put another way, the poems suggest that in the moment something happens, it is already becoming memory, taking the first steps toward myth, neither wholly fiction nor fact, but inhabiting the gray area between. It is into this gray area that the poems look aslant―as though the poetic persona is walking away, looking back over her shoulder―using heightened, lyrical language to describe the commonplace and familiar―a childhood kitchen; a quiet room at dusk; the ritual of Saturday confession; the natural world; the artistic impulse―each filtered through, and mythologized by, the passage of time.

Comments: (2)
Owomed
"What is poetry?" is a question often asked and never answered, indeed unanswerable except in a personal context. I tend toward the "elevated speech" school, or "gorgeous language" persuasion, but language focussed on expressing deeply felt and perceived truth. So I find Myrna Stone's poems immensely satisfying.
Open her book at random, as I just have. "Penitential" says that on Saturday evening we went to church, perhaps for confession, perhaps for "devotions." Our religion impressed us with our guilt and need for penance. Still, walking home, we experienced the world as it was and knew that we would continue to need forgiveness. But this poem tells this ordinary tale in rich, magnificent language,
"...light has gathered,
luminous for a moment in its passage
into night, in its clear and familiar
sense of diminishing grace,
what the priests for years allowed us
from one summer Saturday to the next,
so that while feeding the dog or setting
the table, we might well look
up to find the kingdom of God suddenly
come, and ourselves, in our sparest
and smallest duties, surely wanting."
I don't think you have to be (or have been) Catholic to appreciate this poem.
There is variety in these poems, and wit, not always benign, for example, "Your Last Mistress" that begins
"Is older than I thought" and ends, after explaining that she has found a new lover,
"...She's back again
in the groove, in the saddle, back again
back on her back."
There are poems here that relate travel experiences, family difficulties and pleasures (sometimes experienced while travelling), and the pain of loss of parent - all with a very grown-up sensibility and mastery of expression to die for, or rather, to be most grateful for. To my mind and ear, these poems are a treasure.
Agamaginn
In 'The Art of Loss' Myrna Stone starts with an ele-
giac poem to a poetry friend and ends with an elegiac poem to
her mother. Stone is doing tough and necessary work, namely:
Since we all lose in the end, how can we talk about being tri-
umphant? But in her mature, brilliant poems Myrna Stone does
triumph and bucks all of us up in the process-- with gems like
"Waiting for Daddy", "The Lost Boy", "Your Last Mistress", and
"Home Movies", to name just a few. And her poems dealing with
Van Gogh and Degas are superb ( "The Tub" is flat out aces.)
Stephen Dunn says that in Myrna Stone's poems "we
see pathos rise to the level of the sublime"-- a statement
that got me thinking of Charlie Chaplin, how he would have
loved these poems! Lucky for us, we can savor them:
And if you begin to speak to me
of what desire is like on the opposing
plane, of what extreme punishments
or pleasures await even the least of us
I would dissuade you,
I would kiss your cheek and lead you here
to this room, to this chair, this desk
and this window's suddenly luminescent view.
WORDS FOR MY MOTHER
'The Art of Loss'is one book we should keep close by as we
go through this crazy world.