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by Siegfried Sassoon

eBook The War Poems of Siegfried Sassoon download ISBN: 1438506945
Author: Siegfried Sassoon
Publisher: Book Jungle (December 15, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 72
ePub: 1842 kb
Fb2: 1594 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lit azw doc mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Poetry

166 poems of Siegfried Sassoon. Best Poem of Siegfried Sassoon. Suicide In The Trenches

166 poems of Siegfried Sassoon. Although Sassoon's poems were badly received by the hypocritical, pro-war establishment of the time, they resonated with the millions who served in the trenches and felt exactly what he wrote about Best Poem of Siegfried Sassoon. Suicide In The Trenches. I knew a simple soldier boy Who grinned at life in empty joy, Slept soundly through the lonesome dark, And whistled early with the lark.

LibriVox recording of The War Poems of Siegfried Sassoon by Siegfried Sassoon. Read in English by volunteer readers

LibriVox recording of The War Poems of Siegfried Sassoon by Siegfried Sassoon. Read in English by volunteer readers. Siegfried Sassoon was one of the first to write poetry about the brutal reality of war, based on his real-life experiences in the trenches. He served in World War I on the Western Front and was awarded the Military Cross for bravery under fire. However, he later became a convicted pacifist, threw his Military Cross into the Mersey river, and continued to write and publish poems and political statements against the war.

The War Poems of Siegfried Sassoon. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Bookmate – an app that makes you want to read.

Siegfried Sassoon's aptly-titled WAR POEMS, compiled by Rupert Hart-Davis, is less a book of poetry than a guided tour through the muck, duckboards and barbed wire of No Man's Land. Sassoon was a paradox as a human being

Siegfried Sassoon's aptly-titled WAR POEMS, compiled by Rupert Hart-Davis, is less a book of poetry than a guided tour through the muck, duckboards and barbed wire of No Man's Land. Sassoon was a paradox as a human being. A sensitive and cultivated man and a world-famous poet when still in his twenties, he was also a ferocious fighter on the battlefield, dubbed "Mad Jack" by his men and a holder of the prestigious Military Cross

The family of Siegfried Sassoon believed he had hurled his Military Cross into the River Mersey in protest over the war. But the medal was found 90 years later at Benbuie Lodge on Mull. The item, along with Sassoon's identification tag, had been expected to raise up to £25,000 at auction.

The family of Siegfried Sassoon believed he had hurled his Military Cross into the River Mersey in protest over the war. His Webley revolver, which was also found in the attic, has been given to the Imperial War Museum. Sassoon achieved renown for his vehement criticism of the war and was acclaimed as a writer of satirical anti-war verse.

Siegfried Sassoon is best remembered for his angry and compassionate poems about World War I, which brought him . The later collection The War Poems of Siegfried Sassoon included 64 poems of the war, most written while Sassoon was in hospital recovering from his injuries.

Siegfried Sassoon is best remembered for his angry and compassionate poems about World War I, which brought him public and critical acclaim. Public reaction to Sassoon’s poetry was fierce. Some readers complained that the poet displayed little patriotism, while others found his shockingly realistic depiction of war to be too extreme. Even pacifist friends complained about the violence and graphic detail in his work.

Siegfried Loraine Sassoon, CBE, MC (8 September 1886 – 1 September 1967) was an English poet, writer, and soldier

Siegfried Loraine Sassoon, CBE, MC (8 September 1886 – 1 September 1967) was an English poet, writer, and soldier

Sassoon's war poems were originally published in "The Old Huntsman" (1917) and "Counter-Attack" (1918). After the war, he went on to write several other books of poetry and criticism, as well as six volumes of prose autobiography. Библиографические данные.

Sassoon's war poems were originally published in "The Old Huntsman" (1917) and "Counter-Attack" (1918). War Poems of Siegfried Sassoon.

Siegfried Sassoon was a wonderful poet and writer, he created many masterpiece. ut it was Great War with it horrors and pains . If you hold this book, you will soon read his best poems and enjoy many beautiful moments. ut it was Great War with it horrors and pains that arose in him his great and unique talent, made him write his best . .hings and gave him world fam. f you hold this book, you will soon read his best poems and enjoy many beautiful moments. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

Author: Siegfried Sassoon. Release Date: January 22, 2005. A collection of the poems Siegfried Sassoon wrote about World War I. Very thought-provoking in their observations of a war that Sassoon hated and yet felt compelled to support

Author: Siegfried Sassoon. start of this project gutenberg ebook the war poems of siegfried sassoon . Produced by Ted Garvin, Linda Cantoni, and the PG Online Distributed Proofreading Team. The war poems of siegfried sassoon. Very thought-provoking in their observations of a war that Sassoon hated and yet felt compelled to support. Wonderful poems, though. ksmyth 18Go to ksmyth 18's profile.

At the dawn of World War I, poet Sassoon exchanged his pastoral pursuits of cricket, fox-hunting, and romantic verse for army life amid the muddy trenches of France. This collection of his epigrammatic and satirical poetry conveys the shocking brutality and pointlessness of the Great War and includes "Counter-Attack," "'They," "The General," and "Base Details."
Comments: (7)
Kesalard
Sassoon's war poems are a way to experience WWI's horrors through the eyes of a most sensitive poet, whose delicacy in description is tops. What a terrible shame that Sassoon was killed in this war as he could have contributed so much to our understanding of any situation.
Banal
Sassoon's poetry is incredibly rich, but do NOT buy this version. The publisher incorrectly states (twice) on the back cover that this is a collection of WWII poetry. In fact, Sassoon was one of several remarkable British poets who served in WW 1. The error places this great work in the wrong historical context, which diminishes it. I highly recommend the poetry; fortunately, there are other versions that are available.
Malojurus
I admit I am not one much for poetry, but ever since I read Martin Gilbert's THE FIRST WORLD WAR, which was replete with poetry written in the heat of battle, I've learned that verse is one of the most effective ways for a combat veteran to communicate the experiences of war. Siegfried Sassoon's aptly-titled WAR POEMS, compiled by Rupert Hart-Davis, is less a book of poetry than a guided tour through the muck, duckboards and barbed wire of No Man's Land.

Sassoon was a paradox as a human being. A sensitive and cultivated man and a world-famous poet when still in his twenties, he was also a ferocious fighter on the battlefield, dubbed "Mad Jack" by his men and a holder of the prestigious Military Cross. Disenchanted by the wastage and slaughter he had experienced, in 1917 he wrote a denunciation of the war and was promptly shut up in an asylum in Craiglockhart, Britain, where he composed many of the poems that appear in this book. Later he returned to the front and was shot in the head, but survived and enjoyed a prolific and diverse writing career, somewhat annoyed (as Hart-Davis tells us) that he had gone down in history as a "war poet." Reading this book, however, it is easy to see why.

Hart-Davis has arranged the 111 poems in chronological order, so that the reader can follow Sassoon's emotional journey from a naive young subaltern filled with a quasi-religious sense of mission (in 1915) to an embittered, half-delirious veteran driven to the edge of his sanity by relentless horror. And truly his poems run the range of emotions, from the mundanities of trench life ("A Working Party"; "In An Underground Dressing Station") to the moments before the ball went up ("Before the Batlle") to fury of combat itself ("Counter Attack") and its aftermath ("Died of Wounds"). Every aspect of the war is discussed, from war-fever to cowardice, from the bungling and incompetence of generals to the bluster of civilians back in England. Sometimes he's filled with rage and grief; other times with admiration and pathos (as with "Remorse", his paen to German prisoners run through with bayonets after an attack). But always there's the keen intelligence, the gift for words, the startling ability to convey image in just a few syllables, that mark the true genius-writer. See "The General:"

"Good morning, good morning" the general said

When we met him last week on our way to the line

Now the soldiers he smiled at are most of 'em dead

And we're cursing his staff for incompetent swine

"He's a cheery old card," grunted Harry to Jack

As they slogged up to Arras with rifle and pack.

But he did for them both with his plan of attack.

Of course quoting from the best of the WAR POEMS would fill 30 pages, so I'll leave you with the words of "Base Details."

If I were fierce, and bald, and short of breath,

I'd live with scarlet Majors at the Base,

and speed young heroes up the line to death.

You'd see my puffy petulant face,

Guzzling and gulping in the best hotel,

Reading the Roll of Honor, "Poor young chap."

I'd say -- "I used to know his father well;

Yes, we lost heavily in this last scrap."

And when the war is done and youth stone dead,

I'd toddle safely home and die -- in bed.
Katishi
Genuine ww1 document
Falya
Great World War I poetry- well, of course, it is Sassoon. It is well selected and well presented. Good publication.
Ubranzac
sad, beautiful, maddening. Everyone should read these words. They are as poignant today as they were when they were written, a time from which we have unfortunately failed to learn.
Morad
Reading Sassoon's war poems is a trying experience that sears the soul. If you ever thought being a soldier would be a glorious experience, these poems will disabuse you. But you will also be entranced - I think that is the right word - by the music of the language. Sassoon does not have the incredible rhythms of Kipling or Tennyson. His Poetry is more in keeping with post-expressionism, word pictures that stay with you for a long time. It is a little like seeing Picasso or Kandinski when you are used to Rembrandt or Turner.
Great poet.