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by Anthony Trollope

eBook Doctor Thorne (Trollope, Penguin) download ISBN: 0140438068
Author: Anthony Trollope
Publisher: Penguin Classics (October 1, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 592
ePub: 1326 kb
Fb2: 1359 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: docx lrf mbr lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Literary

His books are not exciting adventures nor do they contain much that could be called exciting happen in them. The stories move slowly, but delightfully so.

His books are not exciting adventures nor do they contain much that could be called exciting happen in them.

by. Anthony Trollope. First published in 1858. I. The Greshams of Greshamsbury II. Long, Long Ago III. Dr Thorne IV. Lessons from Courcy Castle V. Frank Gresham's First Speech VI. Frank Gresham's Early Loves VII. The Doctor's Garden VIII. Matrimonial Prospects IX. Sir Roger Scatcherd X. Sir Roger's Will XI. The Doctor Drinks His Tea XII.

Doctor Thorne by Anthony TrollopeDoctor Thorne by Anthony .

Doctor Thorne by Anthony TrollopeDoctor Thorne by Anthony TrollopeDoctor Thorne by Anthony TrollopeSon of a bankrupt landowner, Frank Gresham is intent on marrying his beloved Mary Thorne, despite her illegitimacy and apparent poverty. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. When Reverend Josiah Crawley, the impoverished curate of Hogglestock, is accused of theft it causes a public scandal, sending shockwaves through the world of Barsetshire.

Anthony Trollope (/ˈtrɒləp/; 24 April 1815 – 6 December 1882) was an English novelist of the Victorian era. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary coun. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary county of Barsetshire. He also wrote novels on political, social, and gender issues, and other topical matters. Trollope's literary reputation dipped somewhat during the last years of his life, but he had regained the esteem of critics by the mid-20th century.

Anthony Trollope For the latest books, recommendations, offers and more.

N. John Hall (Introducer). DOCTOR THORNE revolves round the characters of the doctor and his niece, Mary, but the complex social life of which they are a part, ranging in scope from great houses to poor cottages, is almost more important than individual characters. If God is in the details, these novels are indeed divine. For the latest books, recommendations, offers and more.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Doctor Thorne (Penguin Classics). 5 Mb. Can You Forgive Her. Trollope Anthony.

His books include the great Chronicles of Barsetshire, of which Barchester Towers is the second volume.

Dr Thorne, considered by Trollope to be the best of his works, is a telling examination of the relationship between money and morality. It recounts the story of the son of a bankrupt landowner, Frank Gresham, who is intent on marrying his beloved Mary Thorne despite her illegitimacy and apparent poverty. His books include the great Chronicles of Barsetshire, of which Barchester Towers is the second volume. Trollope worked for the Post Office for much of his adult life, combining postal and literary business as he travelled around the British Empire.

Doctor Thorne, considered by Trollope to be the best of his works, is a telling examination of the relationship between money and morality. You must give up this mad idea, Frank. there is but one course left open to you. You MUST marry money'. Doctor Thorne, considered by Trollope to be the best of his works, is a telling examination of the relationship between money and morality

item 1 Doctor Thorne (Penguin Classics) By Anthony Trollope -Doctor Thorne (Penguin Classics) . Doctor Thorne adopts his niece Mary, keeping secret her illegitimate birth as he introduces her to the best local social circles

item 1 Doctor Thorne (Penguin Classics) By Anthony Trollope -Doctor Thorne (Penguin Classics) By Anthony Trollope. Doctor Thorne adopts his niece Mary, keeping secret her illegitimate birth as he introduces her to the best local social circles. There she meets and falls in love with Frank Gresham, heir to a vastly mortgaged estate; yet Frank is obliged to find a wealthy wife, jeopardizing Mary's happiness until fate extends an obliging hand. Where fiery passion fails, understated English virtues of patience, persistence and good humor could yet prevail in this most appealing of Trollope's (1815-82) comedies.

1993 stated first printing in Penguin Books - Penguin-Trollope -7. Paperback. ISBN: 0140438068
Comments: (7)
Ungall
Anthony Trollope is one of my favorite authors. His books are not exciting adventures nor do they contain much that could be called exciting happen in them. The stories move slowly, but delightfully so. His style of writing, the expressions he uses, are unique to him, and add to the delight. We get to know the characters in the drama in a better way than most writers are able to describe them, and we come to sympathize with those people Trollope wants us to sympathize. For example, the warden is described in the book called The Warden as a very pious and extremely likeable man. We feel that what happens to him is tragic.
He wrote 47 outstanding novels as well as short stories and other writings. He published his first novel in 1847. I read and enjoyed every one of his full length novels, and they grace a prominent place on my book shelves among my 12,000 books. He lived between 1815 and 1882 and was an English writer of the Victorian period. He was a friend of Charles Dickens and Wilke Collins who also liked his books. The Warden is his most famous book. It is the book that brought him fame in 1851. It is the first of his six novels about the fictional Barsetshire which focus on the events in an imaginary county of that name. Doctor Thorne is the third volume in the six book series. It was published in 1858 when Trollope was forty-three-years old.
Anayaron
This was the second book I’ve read this year in my Trollope project. Like Barchester Towers and The Warden in the series, Dr. Thorne was another well-plotted romance with interesting characters and Trollope’s enjoyable humor.

In this book, Doctor Thorne has raised his niece Mary--the illegitimate offspring of Thorne’s deceased ne’r-do-well brother. Mary has grown up to be independent, intelligent, and kind, the center of life in the community. And Frank Gresham, the sole male heir of the storied Gresham estate, has naturally fallen in love with her. The problem, of course, is that Mary has neither a fortune nor a good birth. Frank is expected to marry wealth in order to save his family’s property and social status, and so the family determines to throw just about everything in the young couple’s way.

Like the other Trollope novels I’ve read recently, this one was a pure pleasure. I can’t say that I liked it as well as Barchester Towers. Doctor Thorne is a little more predictable and lacks some of the moral intrigue of that more complex story. What is is, though, is a very good, if straightforward, read. I can see how it was turned into a successful show and will eagerly look forward to the next of the Barsetshire Series.
Hellstaff
Dr. Thorne is a country doctor whose niece Mary lives with him in Greshamsbury, a village near the ancestral home of the Gresham family. The family is teetering on the edge of complete bankruptcy, and in order to regain the house's former glory, young Frank Gresham must "marry money" even though he is in love with Mary Thorne. He gets thrown together with several "suitable" young ladies, but he is determined to marry Mary, who doesn't give him much encouragement. Meanwhile Sir Roger Scatcherd is dying and wants to change his will, leaving all his money to the eldest child of his late sister, also named Mary, if his son, Louis, dies before he is 25. Dr. Thorne is the only one aware that his niece Mary is that eldest child, and therefore stands to gain a huge inheritance if her cousin doesn't make it. You can probably guess the rest.

My big beef with this story is not how obvious the plot is, but in how overwritten it was. It was full of descriptions and side stories that didn't help the plot. And, as in many Trollope books, the whole "Frank must marry money," theme was monotonous, several of the characters had nothing more important to say but said it over and over again. I was also irritated that Mary "knew" she could never marry Frank because he had to marry a rich lady, which she was not. At times it seemed like Frank was the only rational one in this debate. In other words, it's a good thing this book wasn't called "Mary Thorne," because she is not really the heroine. Nobody is. This is definitely not Trollope at his best.
Knights from Bernin
Volume 3 in Trollope's Barchester series moves away from the intricacies of church politics and focuses on the English caste system in the mid 19th century.
The novel is called after a man whom Trollope declares as his hero: a poor country doctor with professional competence and an admirable honest stubbornness, a bachelor who lives with a lovely niece, whom he treats like a daughter. Doc Thorne is a proud man, proud to be a poor man from a high family.
The niece might be considered the real heroine. She is an illegitimate child of the Doc's late brother with a woman who emigrated with another man, leaving the girl behind. The girl's social status is that of a pariah, which begins to be relevant when men start seeing her as a woman.
She is a proud and smart person, with a mind at war with itself. She fully accepts the social ranking system that condemns her to be an underdog. She knows that she is a superior person in all other respects.
Trollope is overdoing his communication with the reader a little here. He insists on telling us that the real hero of the novel is young Frank Gresham, the local squire's only son. Frank is just growing up in the world and needs to find his way in questions of rank and preferences. He finds out that all is not well with the estate and that he better finds a way to marry money if he wants to keep up the life style that he has grown up expecting. Or are emotions more important? One has social duties as well!
The ground is thus prepared for a plot with psychological and social depth, all wrapped in satirical fun poked at pretensions and stupidity. Maybe Trollope's most Austenian novel, at least among those that I know so far.