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eBook The New York Trilogy download

by Paul Auster

eBook The New York Trilogy download ISBN: 1931243573
Author: Paul Auster
Publisher: Green Integer (February 15, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 360
ePub: 1467 kb
Fb2: 1263 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mbr rtf txt docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Literary

The New York Trilogy. Praise from Around the World for The New York Trilogy. By turning the mystery novel inside out, Auster may have initiated a whole new round of storytelling.

The New York Trilogy. Introduction by luc sante. The Village Voice (USA). In his vivid modern New York the energies of literary creation are brought vitally alive, in a great American tradition. The Sunday Times (England). A stunning, hypnotic book.

Auster is writing in unfamiliar territory, and he doesn’t have all the answers himself. The book could even be seen as partially autobiographical

Auster is writing in unfamiliar territory, and he doesn’t have all the answers himself. The book could even be seen as partially autobiographical. Paul Auster is actually a character in multiple stories, and the book expertly blurs the line between reality and fiction. It makes for an intensely entertaining and thought-provoking read.

The New York Trilogy book. Moving at the breathless pace of a thriller, this uniquely stylized triology of detective novels begins with City of Glass, in which Quinn, a The remarkable, acclaimed series of interconnected detective novels – from the author of 4 3 2 1: A Novel.

The New York Trilogy is a series of novels by Paul Auster. Originally published sequentially as City of Glass (1985), Ghosts (1986) and The Locked Room (1986), it has since been collected into a single volume. A 2006 reissue by Penguin Books is fronted by new pulp magazine-style covers by comic book illustrator Art Spiegelman. The first story, City of Glass, features a detective fiction e investigator who descends into madness as he becomes embroiled in a case.

The New York Trilogy is perhaps the most astonishing work by one of America& most consistently astonishing writers

The New York Trilogy is perhaps the most astonishing work by one of America& most consistently astonishing writers. The Trilogy is three cleverly interconnected novels that exploit the elements of standard detective fiction and achieve a new genre that is all the more gripping for its starkness. Paul Benjamin Auster (born February 3, 1947, Newark, New Jersey) is a Brooklyn-based author known for works blending absurdism and crime fiction, such as "The New York Trilogy" (1987), "Moon Palace" (1989) and "The Brooklyn Follies" (2005).

First published in 1985??1986, "The New York Trilogy "("City of Glass, Ghosts," and "The Locked Room") brought immediate international attention to its author, Paul Auster, and elevated him to near-celebrity status, particularly in France. Auster's trilogy broke ground in its mix of serious. The New York trilogy. City and town life - New York (State) - New York - Fiction. - Social life and customs - Fiction.

He is the place where everything begins for me, and without him I would hardly know who I am. We met before we could talk, babies crawling through the grass in diapers, and by the time we were seven. we had pricked our fingers with pins and made ourselves blood brothers for life. Whenever I think of my childhood now, I see Fanshawe. But that was a long time ago. We grew up, went off to different places, drifted apart. None of that is very strange, I think

Moving at the breathless pace of a thriller, this uniquely stylized triology of detective novels begins with City of Glass, in which Quinn, a mystery writer, receives an ominous phone call in the middle of the night. He’s drawn into the streets of New York, onto an elusive case that’s more puzzling and more deeply-layered than anything he might have written himself. In Ghosts, Blue, a mentee of Brown, is hired by White to spy on Black from a window on Orange Street.

First published in 1985â?“1986, The New York Trilogy (City of Glass, Ghosts, and The Locked Room) brought immediate international attention to its author, Paul Auster, and elevated him to near-celebrity status, particularly in France.

This trilogy and his many works since then (including In the Country of Last Words, Leviathan, Mr. Vertigo, Moon Palace, and others) have been translated into numerous languages and have brought him further world attention. Auster's trilogy broke ground in its mix of serious fictional techniques and detective and mystery genres. Geoffrey O'Brien of The Village Voice wrote: "The New York Trilogy are novels of desire: the desire to write a detective novel, to read one, to -inhabit it. . . . By turning the mystery novel inside out, Auster may have -initiated a whole new round of storytelling." This new edition will delight readers and collectors of Auster's work.

Comments: (7)
Ckelond
Paul Auster’s New York Trilogy has been waiting for a review for a few weeks now. I can confidently say that I’ve never read a more confusing, unresolved book than this one. What’s incredible about Auster’s work, though, is that this doesn’t condemn the book in any way. If you’re a fan of neat and easy storybook endings that are predictable from a million miles away, stay away from The New York Trilogy. If you like great writing that gives you a headache, this is the novel for you.

The New York Trilogy is, like the title implies, a collection of three shorter stories originally published as three different books. While they seem to have nothing in common, the trilogy as a whole is definitely one story, or at least three facets of one story. There isn’t a sentence that could capture any of these stories, so let the back cover text intrigue you:

City of Glass: As a result of a strange phone call in the middle of the night, Quinn, a writer of detective stories, becomes enmeshed in a case more puzzling than any he might have written.
Ghosts: Blue, a student of Brown, has been hired by White to spy on Black. From a window of a rented room on Orange Street, Blue keeps watch on his subject, who is across the street, staring out of his window.
The Locked Room: Fanshawe has disappeared, leaving only his wife and a baby and a cache of extraordinary novels, plays, and poems. What happened to him — and why is the narrator, Fanshawe’s boyhood friend, lured obsessively into his life.

None of these stories follow any traditional pattern. City of Glass fizzles into existential questioning at the expense of any action. Ghosts comes to a surprising head, and is marked by the total non-characterization of its colorful characters. The Locked Room appears to be a regular mystery story, until the narrator inherits Fanshawe’s wife and life, and is wracked by dread when Fanshawe seems to have reappeared. None of these stories are an easy read, or go in the direction that you expect. Also, they make absolutely no sense.

All of the stories feature intriguing overlaps. Characters have the same or similar names, patterns of events repeat, and the red notebook is frequently seen. Obsession and identity are key themes across the trilogy. In the end, all three stories hang together in such a way that they’re inextricably unrelated. There are no spoilers to give away because you will finish the book without a clue of what happened.

Many people dislike Auster and his work for this reason, but I found something intriguing under the surface of The New York Trilogy. Auster is writing in unfamiliar territory, and he doesn’t have all the answers himself. The book could even be seen as partially autobiographical. Paul Auster is actually a character in multiple stories, and the book expertly blurs the line between reality and fiction. It makes for an intensely entertaining and thought-provoking read.

If you read The New York Trilogy, you will find yourself obsessed the entire time you are reading it. Just like the characters in the stories, you will throw books, pace and debate what is true, and find yourself increasingly obsessed with understanding what is going on. Auster has accomplished one thing for sure: whatever this book is about, it’s exciting enough to totally enmesh its readers in its world. I’m looking forward to putting more time into decoding the meaning of the story — I have lots of notes, but no answers yet!
inform
This is three stories loosely tied together, all set out as a detective tales but they are not detective tales. This took me a bit of reading before I figured it out.

The three stories are about the art of writing, they are all concerned with observation , obsession and dedication to a task.

I very nearly stopped half way through the first story but the writing has a cadence to it that was very relaxing, it just wandered along. I assume those that really know call this experimental writing stream of consciousness stuff.

I'm struggling to describe what it is but I enjoyed it in the end even if I haven't fully understood it all.
Antuiserum
Paul Auster’s novel, The New York Trilogy, is a unique blend of metafiction and mystery, with a definitive detective, noir flavor and vibe. There is a common bond within all three tales in that there is a sense of isolation experienced within the main character’s point of view as they head towards an unseen destination in their investigation/search. At points, the protagonist, in looking for someone or something, is forced to look inwardly, sometimes painfully and truthfully, at themselves.

In “City of Glass”, author Quinn assumes the role of “detective” as he tries to locate and find the whereabouts of the elder Peter Stillman. Stillman allegedly wreaked severe psychological damage on his son, Peter Stillman. The case and search take on a life of its own as Quinn becomes immersed in this case to the point of breakdown and obsession. Auster captures the frustration of Quinn during his search: “…there seemed to be no substance to the case. Stillman was a crazy old man who had forgotten his son. He could be followed to the end of time, and still nothing would happen.”

“Ghosts”, the second of the trilogy and my favorite of the three, is quite a colorful read (in more ways than one). A man named Blue is hired by a guy named White to tail another man named Black (make sense). In much the same manner as “City of Glass”, there is the sense that the one doing the tracking must get into the head of the one they are tracking. They must come up with their own theories, and Blue does not know enough about Black so must take this on in a forceful way, delve into the makeup of Black: “They only way for Blue to have a sense of what is happening is to be inside Blacks’ mind to see what his is thinking, and that of course is impossible.” After much speculating and wondering, things shift quite suddenly in the second part of the plot and we have interaction between Blue and Black that takes us to a sudden conclusion.
“It seems to me now that Fanshawe was always there. He is the place where everything begins for me, and without him I would hardly know who I am.” So begins the final installment in the trilogy, “The Locked Room.” The Locked Room focuses on the search for a writer named Fanshawe, who has been missing for six months. Fanshawe’s wife contacts an acquaintance from Fanshawe’s childhood to help look for the writer. Eventually, things get more complicated when she asks, as a favor, for him to critique her husband’s writings. Becoming fully immersed in the case, the narrator suddenly seems to assume the role of Fanshawe, marrying his wife and trying to get his works published. The narrator takes on much of who Fanshawe is. As the narrator gets closer to understanding more, he begins to question a sense of his own identity.

I found The New York Trilogy to be a breath of fresh air, very non-traditional and unique.

There is ambiguity and vagueness to all three novellas, and that is perfectly fine. It forces the readers to be much like the main characters, and assume their own conclusions. And much like the main character in each of the plots, I pushed myself to read on, looking for clues and meanings within. Auster allows room for the reader to interpret, discuss, and think about, much of what goes on.
Andromajurus
The detective story framework used for a more literary exploration of identity and psychosis. Surreal and confusing at times, as gripping and a Hammett mystery at others. Like a French art house film acted out on the streets of New York. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel but I doubt I really understood the intent other than an expression of literary talent.
Qusicam
I have found all of Auster's work to be great. This is no exception. I thoroughly enjoy his style, and his characters are unique and put into interesting situations. Sometimes he gets pretty meta, ; like the first story. I liked this book, and I won't give you a full , proper review , as there are many on here. I will say though, like his other work, it is a worthwhile , engaging read. It's literary stuff.
Endieyab
It is well-written, tricky, kind of absurd --but then, so is life! It should be read as a trilogy. Characters from past stories re-appear in latter stories in ways that subvert previous narrations. Reading this book is engaging because the reader has a constant sense that something needs figuring out. Not an easy book, but I can see why it's so famous.