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eBook DECEPTION download

by Philip Roth

eBook DECEPTION download ISBN: 067173296X
Author: Philip Roth
Publisher: Touchstone; Reprint edition (February 15, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1994 kb
Fb2: 1260 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: docx rtf lrf mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Literary

Deception is a 1990 novel by Philip Roth.

Deception is a 1990 novel by Philip Roth. The novel marks the first time Roth uses his own name as the name of the protagonist within a fictional work; he had previously used himself as a main character in a work of non-fiction - The Facts: A Novelist's Autobiography, and would do so again in the memoir Patrimony. Roth" would also be narrator of the novels Operation Shylock and The Plot Against America.

Book 4 of 7 in the Library of America: Philip Roth Series. It gets even more bizarre between the two men. 'Deception' of 1990 gives the Roth alter ego as a Jewish American writer in England, engaged in dialogues, mostly with a woman with whom he has an adulterous affair. We learn that Zuckerman has died at 44 and the man in the dialogue is working at a biography. Absurdly amusingly confusing.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. With the lover everyday life recedes, " Roth writes-and exhibiting all his skill as a brilliant observer of human passion.

Roth is experimenting with dialogue. Think of this book as the pre- and post- coital conversations between a man and his mistress, interspersed with dialogues with other women and his wife. The narrator is named Philip Roth, just to confuse things (the first time Roth uses his own name and not some stand-in like Portnoy, Kepesh, or Zuckerman) even more.

Philip Roth was born in Newark, New Jersey on 19 March 1933 In 1959, Roth published Goodbye, Columbus – a collection of stories, and a novella – for which he received the National Book Award.

Philip Roth was born in Newark, New Jersey on 19 March 1933. The second child of second-generation Americans, Bess and Herman Roth, Roth grew up in the largely Jewish community of Weequahic, a neighbourhood he was to return to time and again in his writing. After graduating from Weequahic High School in 1950, he attended Bucknell University, Pennsylvania and the University of Chicago, where he received a scholarship to complete his . in English Literature. In 1959, Roth published Goodbye, Columbus – a collection of stories, and a novella – for which he received the National Book Award.

item 1 Deception, Roth, Philip, Very Good Book -Deception, Roth, Philip, Very Good Book. item 2 Deception, Paperback by Roth, Philip, Brand New, Free P&P in the UK -Deception, Paperback by Roth, Philip, Brand New, Free P&P in the UK. £. 3. item 3 Deception by Roth, Philip -Deception by Roth, Philip. item 4 Deception, Roth, Philip, Very Good Book -Deception, Roth, Philip, Very Good Book.

Philip Roth, New York. Zuckerman novels The Ghost Writer (1979) Zuckerman Unbound (1981) The Anatomy Lesson (1983) The Prague Orgy (1985) (The above four books are collected as Zuckerman Bound)

Philip Roth, New York. Zuckerman novels The Ghost Writer (1979) Zuckerman Unbound (1981) The Anatomy Lesson (1983) The Prague Orgy (1985) (The above four books are collected as Zuckerman Bound). The Counterlife (1986) American Pastoral (1997) I Married a Communist (1998) The Human Stain (2000) Exit Ghost (2007). Roth novels Deception: A Novel (1990) Operation Shylock: A Confession (1993) The Plot Against America (2004). Kepesh novels The Breast (1972) The Professor of Desire (1977) The Dying Animal (2001).

Read online books written by Philip Roth in our e-reader absolutely for free. Roth graduated from Bucknell University in 1954. In 1959, he won the National Book Award for Goodbye

Read online books written by Philip Roth in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of Goodbye, Columbus, The Ghost Writer, Nemesis at ReadAnyBook. In 1959, he won the National Book Award for Goodbye,. Roth had his first best-seller with 1969's Portnoy's Complaint. Over the years, he has earned many accolades for his work, including a second National Book Award for 1995's Sabbath's Theatre and a Pulitzer Prize for American Pastoral. His later works include Everyman (2006) and Nemesis (2010).

Read Deception, by Philip Roth online on Bookmate – With the lover . At the center of Deception are two adulterers in their hiding place.

Read Deception, by Philip Roth online on Bookmate – With the lover everyday life recedes, Roth writes-and exhibiting all his skill as a brilliant observer of human passion, he presents in Decepti. He is a middle-aged American writer named Philip, living in London, and she is an articulate, intelligent, well-educated Englishwoman compromised by a humiliating marriage to which, in her thirties, she is already nervously half-resigned. The book’s action consists of conversation-mainly the lovers talking to each other before and after making love.

With the lover everyday life recedes," Roth writesand exhibiting all his skill as a brilliant observer of human passion, he presents in Deception the tightly enclosed world of adulterous intimacy with a directness that has no equal in American fiction.

Presents an intimate, incisive portrait of a married, middle-aged American living in London and his mistress, a married Englishwoman, through a private, adulterous dialogue
Comments: (7)
Yannara
He said, She said. It's all very confusing. Or, rather deceptive...
Great dialogue. But hard to follow who is speaking to whom.
Eventually, it doesn't really matter. It's the conversation that's the backbone of the book.
Text voyeurism. Eavesdropping on two people in intimate conversation.
It's a shame that voice recognition can't be incorporated in the text!
Read a second time around some of the characters come out of anonymity.
Deception (in the eternal triangle) remains.
The Czech girl episodes... Just great!
Vobei
I am rereading all the Roth books. This one reads like doodles during a staff meeting. It is interesting how these musings are collected into a book that does not flow in the style of a novel. Reading the books in order of their publication dates is quite a picture into Roth's mental state throughout his career. He is funny, insightful ,sad, melancholy, profound, and sometimes all of the above.
Rrd
Excellent as all of his books are I intend to read them all
Zeli
I would have sent the book back, but did not know how to do it. Surprised that Roth could write such a boring book.
Runeterror
This was not one of Phillip Roth's best efforts. It was somewhat disjunctive making it hard for the reader to tie the story together.
Fawrindhga
Roth is a master. No novelist can touch him.
Armin
'The trouble with life is you don't really know what's going on at all.' The main objective of this short novel is the explanation of this insight.
A series of dialogues involving Philip Roth's alter ego, a Jewish American writer in England, called Philip. He listens most of the time, most often to a married woman, who visits him in his Spartan studio (that he rented for writing, away from home). She talks a lot about her shaky marriage.
Sometimes other people talk, some women who seem to have had a relation with him, and some men, who accuse him of going for their women.
When Philip speaks, he seems much preoccupied by English anti-semitism, anti-Israelism, and anti-Americanism, in general and even more so in his literary circles. (The book was published in 1990, so the events must be placed in the 80s.) Some confusion boils up, when he discusses his work on a biography of his literary creature Zuckerman. That's a lovely mind bender. The difficulties in writing a bio of a man whom you invented yourself should not be underestimated.
In the middle of all this, Roth suddenly gets put on trial by a feminist tribunal for all kinds of sexist misbehaviors. His heroines are all falling short of proper womanhood. Philip lashes back. Or possibly Roth is defending himself clumsily, with a bad conscience?
And worse: Philip's wife gets to read these notes and accuses him of an affair with that woman. But isn't it all fiction? The fictional wife doesn't believe that.
This is all quite delightfully confusing. All in all, an amusing mess. Not great, probably, but rather lovable for cynics like me. Mystification on a peak.
So imagine William Gaddis' "JR", but about a third of the length and instead of covering a whole host of topics (but mostly money and what it does to people) mostly depicting pillow talk between two people cheating on their spouses. Bingo! Now you have "Deception", a book about people talking.

For those who don't like to read lengthy prose descriptions of, well, anything this book will be both your manna and a godsend as there is essentially no narration at all, no way to tell who is talking other than context, barely any descriptions of action (although it seems pretty clear that not a lot is happening) just a man and a woman chatting (and not always the same woman, it appears) conveyed through the magic of pure dialogue. The man appears to be a writer named "Philip" (not knowing much about Roth's personal life I can never tell if he has the world's best romantic life or would really like to have such a thing) and the woman might be the same woman he wrote about Zuckerman having various states of affairs with in "The Counterlife" (the two books overlap quite a bit thematically, although it's only coincidence that I read them so close together) but hardly any of that seems important as much as the two of them having succinct conversations about love and cheating on your spouse and being Jewish (he is, she's not) and whatever else seems to strike Roth's fancy.

This is one of those books that is either designed to be read in tiny bits, or devoured in one sitting. I did the latter, blazing through it in about ninety minutes, but its set up as chunks of dialogue (unlike "JR", which was one long seven hundred page scene) and snippets, occasionally bursting into the lengthier chunks of monologues that I associate more with Roth. It all goes down quite easily but there's nothing especially revelatory here, and people who have read several Roth novels around the same time period may feel that he's repeating himself, just with different window dressing. He writes fine dialogue (he manages to give a decent sense of place without getting too expository) but his strong point is more the intersection of prose and dialogue. Restricting him to just one aspect, while a nice literary exercise that he had fun doing, is more like watching an artist attempting to work with one arm strapped behind his back. It doesn't help that there isn't, as I noted earlier, a whole lot of narrative heft to the whole thing, most of it coming across as rather paternalistic, with the woman being somewhat unsure of herself and fluttery while Roth is cool and confident and given to long lectures about the things that interest him the most. It's a characterization of a lady that I feel I've read before, which may not be a fair criticism since she may be basically the same woman/woman construct that existed in "The Counterlife".

He also doesn't quite commit to the experiment completely, dropping in a snatch of narration here and there, although if they're you're own self-imposed rules there shouldn't be too many penalties for breaking them. It just comes across as a light work, and when he makes an attempt toward the end to justify it as a necessary self-referential writing exercise (not quite stating if the argument for being self-referential is just part of the writing exercise itself and just as false), it feels like he needed to justify publishing a series of notes and sketches as an actual novel and tacked on the "Is this not literary?" debate after the fact. But the whole novel feels weightless and untethered, not breaking any new ground beyond us giving us a few morsels of juicy dialogue to chew on. If you like Roth already, this is about as close to a "beach read" as you're going to get but if you are just being introduced to him, reading this might make you assume he's a bronzed Adonis, the kind of man irresistible to the likes of you and I. Although a universe where writers are the sexiest creatures to walk this earth isn't one I'd be all too opposed to.