carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » One More River

eBook One More River download

by Lynne Reid Banks

eBook One More River download ISBN: 1903015634
Author: Lynne Reid Banks
Publisher: Barn Owl Books, London; New edition edition (March 15, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1995 kb
Fb2: 1302 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr doc rtf azw
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Literary

Lynne Reid Banks (born 31 July 1929) is a British author of books for children and adults.

Lynne Reid Banks (born 31 July 1929) is a British author of books for children and adults. She has written forty-five books, including the best-selling children's novel The Indian in the Cupboard, which has sold over 10 million copies and has been successfully adapted to film. Her first novel, The L-Shaped Room, published in 1960, was an instant and lasting best seller. It was later made into a movie of the same name and led to two sequels, The Backward Shadow and Two is Lonely.

The book "One More River" by Lynne Reid Banks is a wonderful story, which shows the hardships of an underprivilished life in Israel. Lesley, a rich Canadian Jewish girl leaves her prosperous life to move to Israel with her parents.

Lynne Reid Banks has written a number of books for children and young adults. Her children’s books include The Adventures of King Midas; The Farthest-Away Mountain; Maura’s Angel; The Indian in the Cupboard, recently made into a major Hollywood film; Return of the Indian; The Fairy Rebel; and The Magic Hare. Her books for teenagers include One More River, Sarah and After, My Darling Villain, The Writing on the Wall, Melusine: A Mystery and Broken Bridge. In addition, she has written two historical books about Israel: Letters to My Israeli Sons and Torn Country.

I am all about discovering obscure Lynne Reid Banks books, so when I found a copy of this at a book fair in Indonesia (no, I have no idea what it was doing there), I of course bought it. I was not disappointed. While it doesn't quite live up to the brilliance of Melusine, this still provides a solid story with interesting characters and gives the reader a lot to think about. And now I find that it's a series.

3 people like this topic. Want to like this Page?

by. Banks, Lynne Reid, 1929-.

movies All Video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now! Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library. by. Jews, Kibbutzim, Israel-Arab War, 1967, Jews, Kibbutzim, Israel-Arab War, 1967.

Lynne Reid Banks was born in London, England on July I929. After studying at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, she acted and wrote for the repertory stage. Eventually, she turned to journalism, becoming one of Britain's first female television news reporters

Lynne Reid Banks was born in London, England on July I929. Eventually, she turned to journalism, becoming one of Britain's first female television news reporters. Banks was fired from her job as a reporter, and while working a different job, she wrote her first novel, which went on to become a best seller. Her titles include Fair Exchange, Tom Country, The Spice Rack, and Polly and Jake.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for One More River by Lynne Reid Banks .

item 2 One More River (Puffin Books) by Banks, Lynne Reid Paperback Book The Cheap Fast -One More River (Puffin Books) by Banks, Lynne Reid Paperback Book The Cheap Fast. item 3 One More River (Puffin Books), Banks, Lynne Reid, Used; Acceptable Book -One More River (Puffin Books), Banks, Lynne Reid, Used; Acceptable Book.

Lesley lives in Canada and thinks life is just great, she has got friends, she likes school and they are very comfortably off. But then her father makes a fateful decision, the whole family is going to emigrate to Israel and lead a more fully Jewish life. Lesley is horrified and very resistant. However, once she gets to her new country and a very different life, she begins to find it stimulating and enjoyable. A strange relationship with Palestinian boy Mustafa, who lives on the other side of the Jordan river, is a big part of the new Lesley. A very exciting book, set in the 1960s about life in a pioneering new country.
Comments: (7)
Ungall
Only thing wrong was that it was on tape instead of cd. I put it on cd though and is what I wanted, Thanks
Kirizan
I originally read this book as a teenager and it literaly changed my life as I later went to live on a kibbutz and later still emigrated to Israel and lived there for several years. I bought this version as a gift to my Israeli daughter in part so that she can learn one of the reasons that she exists. I can't really comment on the changes as it is too long since I read the original.
Lesley is a rich and spoiled teenager living in Canada. her parents take her to live on a kibbutz in Israel. She has to share a room and to learn to live with almost no possesions. Starting as an outcast she gradually learns the language, adapts to working and learns to fit in to her new environment. She also develops a "relationship' with an Arab boy from across the river Jordan.
The story is set just before and during the 1967 Six Day War and helps to provide younger readers with an insight into the history of and politics of the time. It is simplistic in some ways but this is to be expected given the target age of its readers. It also helps to explain the optimism of the time and the assumption that Israeli occupation of the territories would be a short term thing - highly relevant given the ongoing conflict as many readers no doubt have questions about how it all started.
The story of Lesley is enjoyable for younger readers who will be able to relate to her and the history is a bonus. It is of course a story with only one point of view but I feel that it does begin to address the frustration of the Arabs in the area. This is further examined in the sequel "Broken Bridge".
Xarcondre
Never mind that it's a young adult book. Lynne Reid Banks' work has such a vast scope, it should not be missed by anyone.
The book is set in 1968. Lesley is a typical teenager. She's always trendily dressed, always popular, always the envied one. Then her father announces that the entire family is going to emigrate to Israel. She cries, pleads, threatens, but soon enough they arrive on a border kibbutz. Lesley doesn't speak Hebrew, can't do much in the way of chores, and is at first treated like anathema by her peers. Meanwhile, the conflict between Israel and Jordan escalates. Across the River Jordan, surprisingly lacking in width or depth, she observes over time a young boy whose loneliness reminds her of herself. Despite knowing better, Lesley cannot imagine him an enemy. When war breaks out, the world of the kibbutz seems terribly fragile, but Lesley finds herself fighting as desperately as her neighbors to hold on.
The relationship between Lesley and Mustapha, however brief, is one of the most unforgettable I've ever read about. The final scene of the book still haunts me. I reread it at least once a year.
Renthadral
one of my favoUrites when I was a child. Like some other readers, this was a book which changed my life, and encouraged me to go to Israel when I was eighteen and work on a kibbutz. Lesley, the heroine, is less enthusiastic when her parents make her move to Israel from the prairies of Canada, leaving her brother Noah behind - and not only that, but to work on a kibbutz, a place predicated on different ideals than she is used to, those of equality. Lesley ends up falling in love with an Arab boy, Mustapha, which is reciprocated. Set around the time of the Six-Day War with Palesine, we are hopeful that this is the way we can have true peace in our time.

I would recommend the trilogy of Lynne Reid Banks' books, including the L-shaped Room and An End to Running, for further reading, rather than the sequel 'The Broken Bridge.'
Thundershaper
Banks writes about a complete, real-life situation about a Jewish family moving to find their genuine way of life. "A large part of the novel--set during the days before, during, and after the 1967 Six-Day War--chronicles Lesley's gradual, difficult adjustment, and her growing friendship from afar with Mustapha, an Arab boy. The story is fleshed out with numerous details about kibbutz life, farming, and military maneuvers, which bring a sense of realism." (Fader). Fader provides a perfect description of the plot of the book. Banks also includes Yiddish words with a glossary, which enhances the reading comprehension of the book for knowledge of a different language. This is a top rate novel for kids or teens, especially whom are interested in the Jewish religion, traveling, and war. "The story is set just before and during the 1967 Six Day War and helps to provide younger readers with an insight into the history of and politics of the time. It is simplistic in some ways but this is to be expected given the target age of its readers. It also helps to explain the optimism of the time and the assumption that Israeli occupation of the territories would be a short term thing - highly relevant given the ongoing conflict as many readers no doubt have questions about how it all started." (Shapiro).