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eBook Counter-Clock World download

by Philip K. Dick

eBook Counter-Clock World download ISBN: 0340218304
Author: Philip K. Dick
Publisher: Coronet; New Ed edition (1977)
Language: English
Pages: 160
ePub: 1455 kb
Fb2: 1539 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: txt lit docx mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Literary

Home Philip K. Dick Counter-Clock World. As the coffin was lifted up by Sebastian, Dr. Sign and Bob Lindy, Father Faine read aloud from his prayer book, in a suitably commanding and clear voice, so as to be audible to the person within the coffin

Home Philip K. Counter clock world, . Counter-Clock World, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21. Table of Contents. Sign and Bob Lindy, Father Faine read aloud from his prayer book, in a suitably commanding and clear voice, so as to be audible to the person within the coffin. ‘The Lord rewarded me after my righteous dealing, according to the cleanness of my hands did he recompense me.

Counter-Clock World is a 1967 science fiction novel by American author Philip K. Dick.

In Counter-Clock World, one of Dick’s most theological and philosophical novels, these troubling questions . In Counter-Clock World, time has begun moving backward. People greet each other with goodbye, blow smoke into cigarettes, and rise from the dead.

In Counter-Clock World, one of Dick’s most theological and philosophical novels, these troubling questions are addressed; though, as always, you may have to figure out the answers yourself. When one of those rising dead is the famous and powerful prophet Anarch Peak, a number of groups start a mad scramble to find him first-but their motives are not exactly benevolent because Anarch Peak may just be worth more dead than alive, and these groups will do whatever they must to send him back to the grave.

Counter-Clock World book. Even the police are terrified of the librarians. Time moves Counter-Clock World is an expansion of Philip K. Dick's short story Your Appointment Will Be Yesterday. In Counter-Clock World, one of the most theologically probing. The ideas are interesting enough to flesh out into a longer story, but that also allows the cracks to show. In this world, because of something called the Hobart Effect, time has begun moving backward.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Dick is the American writer who in recent years has most influenced non-American poets, novelists. One of his shorter dime-length pieces, Counterclock is an ethereal masterpiece that shows time in reverse, dirty plated being filled with food and the dead rising from their graves to be reborn and remember the lives they lived previously. When vitariums and the government compete over profits and the high-profile resurrection of an incredibly influential religious leader, the world is sent into chaos with only a few small players able to intercept and influence the future of reverse-humanity.

How are you? she asked wanly, with a peculiar mechanical listlessness which he had never heard in her voice before are you? Did he get you away . .

How are you? she asked wanly, with a peculiar mechanical listlessness which he had never heard in her voice before are you? Did he get you away from the Library? I guess he did. Were they actually trying to keep you there? They were, she said, still listlessly. How’s the Anarch? she asked. Did he come back to life yet? Sebastian started to say, We dug him up. We revived him. But instead he took pause; he remembered the call from Italy.

Counter-Clock World is an expansion of a short story, and in retrospect that seems obvious. While there were interesting ideas and brilliant moments, in places the plot seemed threadbare, predictions of future fall-out of Dick's contemporary social upheavals not fully thought out, and the ending anti-climactic I'll have to reread Do Androids. Anyway, by the end of this book there was no real impact on the world or on me, so despite the fact that I do feel I understood most of it, I won't pretend I either enjoyed or was impressed by it. starcat-1Go to starcat-1's profile. Definitely not one of his better ones.

In Counter-Clock World, one of the most theologically probing of all of Dick’s books, the world has entered the Hobart Phase–a vast sidereal process in which time moves in reverse. As a result, libraries are busy eradicating books, copulation signifies the end of pregnancy, people greet with, Good-bye, and part with, Hello, and underneath the world’s tombstones, the dead are coming back to life.

Are you certain you dug up the Anarch too soon?" Giacometti asked Sebastian, cautiously. Do you actually stipulate that you acted illegally? It would mean a severe fine

Are you certain you dug up the Anarch too soon?" Giacometti asked Sebastian, cautiously. Do you actually stipulate that you acted illegally? It would mean a severe fine. I advise you to deny it. If you so stipulate, we'll refer this to the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office. Sebastian said woodenly, "I-deny we dug up the Anarch prematurely.

1st Coronet edition paperback, vg+
Comments: (7)
Doomwarden
The master of more-than-meets-the-eye pulp takes on time, relationships, and existence in this well-crafted futuristic hymn to death, religion, and the nature of love. One of his shorter dime-length pieces, Counterclock is an ethereal masterpiece that shows time in reverse, dirty plated being filled with food and the dead rising from their graves to be reborn and remember the lives they lived previously. When vitariums and the government compete over profits and the high-profile resurrection of an incredibly influential religious leader, the world is sent into chaos with only a few small players able to intercept and influence the future of reverse-humanity.

The thing about Dick is that he had gone from a pulp fiction mastermind, ratcheting out a respectable library in his lifetime to a cult phenomenon after his death, and then a respected author of great skill and having his collection released by The Library of America only a few years ago. With the Hobart Phase, Dick challenges us to reconsider our relationship with theology and existence, and while it does not have as exciting a whizz-bang environment as many of his other texts, it is an introspective and gritty noir reflection of our own sensibilities that makes it such a great little book. I am most impressed in this volume with his ability to use philosophy and allusions to great writing throughout in a subtle and accessible manner.

While I had read many of his works as an adolescent fascinated with the genre, I can certainly respect and appreciate his words and his skill a great deal more as an adult.
Quashant
The below is a review of the CD Audiobook (not audible) edition of this work

Philip K Dick stories (or at least the better ones) tend to be fairly original with well-developed stories, characters and pathos. This one, fortunately, has some of each of these but, unfortunately, does not have a conclusion. It leaves the reader up in the air. In addition, the main premise of the story that the dead rise from the grave and then decay backwards towards birth stretches the bounds of believability, even for a Philip K Dick story. Even his imagination exceeds his story telling ability in this case. In addition, the audiobook is not very well read further takes away from the experience. The tone of the reading just does not sound appropriate to the story. In short, a two star book. Only for the hardcore fans of Philip K Dick.
Vetitc
I am a sucker for wacky, non-linear time shifts, and this novel did not disappoint, despite some weaknesses. The story starts with Mrs. Tilly M. Benton, crying out from the grave. She has just woken from death, and is eventually disinterred by Sebastian Hermes and his crew from the Flask of Hermes Vitarium, a business that rescues newly reborn corpses and sells them to relatives and other interested parties. This whole scenario is made possible by a freak of nature, which has caused time to reverse, causing people to age backwards from death, and eventually seek out a womb as they become infants.

There is a religion, or perhaps a cult, which provides an overarching framework for the narrative. Sebastian believes the founder of the religion, who has become a prophet figure, is soon to be reborn. The story revolves around finding this leader, and the dynamic conflict among: a) its church, which may have strayed from the prophet's teachings, b) Sebastian and his wife, c) the policeman who originally found Tilly Benton, and d) The Library, which is proxy for an Orwellian shadow government.

The book is 200+ pages. It zips along. The trade-off, however, is that some of the complex plot and character developments are handled in almost a shorthand. I found myself forgiving the author, Dick, for breezing past what really should have been flushed out to make better sense. But then the novel would have been long and had much different pacing. If the novel were written today, it would be 957 pages and be made into a 4-1/2 hour movie.

As neither indulgence is true here, I can recommend this novel. I enjoyed it a great deal. It is fascinatingly weird.
Direbringer
PKD creates strange "platforms", which allow ideas to be examined from unusual points of view. This novel is no exception.

One question Dick repeatedly asks in this highly unusual novel is: "why do humans make such strong, arbitrary, decisions on what is socially acceptable?"

One example. Why is eating a highly social ritual, yet going to the bathroom causes so much anxiety that we have to hide behind doors (preferably far away from where people are) and generally are afraid to even talk about anything to do with it, including the organs under our underwear?

Dick brilliantly uses the device of time flowing backward to reverse the process of ingestion and excretion to examine this and some characters' feelings towards it as the novel progresses.

Why do we pick 17 years old as an age a woman can cause a date to be (technically) guilty of statuatory rape if her shoes are off, yet at 18 any sexual act imaginable is fine and dandy by the law?

Again, by the reverse time sequence of the novel, such issues can be probed in a very thoughtful manner, without all the emotional baggage they would usually entail.

Brilliant. Weird. Subtle. Riveting. Dark. Philosophy. In short, the classic heart of PKD!