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eBook Down by the River download

by Edna O'Brien

eBook Down by the River download ISBN: 0374143277
Author: Edna O'Brien
Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux; 1st Farrar, Straus and Giroux ed edition (April 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 265
ePub: 1940 kb
Fb2: 1304 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mobi mbr rtf lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: learn more about Fulfillment by Amazon

Everyday low prices on a huge range of new releases and classic fiction. Down by the River mirrors the real events of a very similar case in almost hallucinogenic detail and it does so not by denouncing one side or the other, though the anti-abortionists are much the most strident and scarier faction, but by describing events with an almost wistful inevitability, the very opposite of the sensationalist scrum concocted by the media. For her pains, O'Brien's book was banned in Ireland.

Josephine Edna O'Brien was born in 1930 to Michael O'Brien and Lena Cleary at. .Down by the River (1996) concerned an under-age rape victim who sought an abortion in England, the "Miss X case".

Josephine Edna O'Brien was born in 1930 to Michael O'Brien and Lena Cleary at Tuamgraney, County Clare, Ireland, a place she would later describe as "fervid" and "enclosed". Shortly after their publication, these books were banned and, in some cases burned, in her native country due to their frank portrayals of the sex lives of their characters. Down by the River (1996) concerned an under-age rape victim who sought an abortion in England, the "Miss X case" Marriage.

Edna O'Brien has made of her memories something of both precision and depth, a book that, letting us see her . By the time he returns home, he is an institutionalised criminal incapable fo telling the truth even to himself.

Edna O'Brien has made of her memories something of both precision and depth, a book that, letting us see her as she was, jumps with an all-consuming curiosity from one lucidly narrated event to another, the scenes of disenchantment and bewilderment mingling with an assortment of surprises, traps, and ventures that are often, but not always, disastrous shocks. Single mother Eily lives with her you son Maddie in a house Mich camped out in after his mother's death.

Down by the River is a 1997 novel by Irish novelist Edna O'Brien. The novel depicts the response of a local community the a girl, Mary, abuse by her father being exposed to their local community when she tries to get an abortion

Down by the River is a 1997 novel by Irish novelist Edna O'Brien. The novel depicts the response of a local community the a girl, Mary, abuse by her father being exposed to their local community when she tries to get an abortion. The ensuing legal battle in a country which bans abortions.

Down by the River book. Set in her native Ireland, Edna O'Brien's newest novel explores the dark and torturous aspects of family ties

Down by the River book. Set in her native Ireland, Edna O'Brien's newest novel explores the dark and torturous aspects of family ties. As Mary, the young heroine, tries first to conceal and then to escape her father's fateful attention, she finds herself driven into an emotional Styx. She becomes pregnant with her father's child, and as her private - and redeemable - tragedy is dragged into the Set in her native Ireland, Edna O'Brien's newest novel explores the dark and torturous aspects of family ties.

Down by the River is her most exciting and rewarding book by far' Observer.

At the centre of the crisis a young girl struggles with the conflicts of mind and body, the teaching of her faith and her mounting bewilderment at what she must do. As she tries to conceal, then escape her fate, she finds herself driven to the brink of despair  . Down by the River is her most exciting and rewarding book by far' Observer.

Down by the River by Edna O’Brien. CII, May 25, 1997, p. 11. The New Yorker. DOWN BY THE RIVER shows Ireland as a country ruled by males but filled with women who cooperate in the subjugation of their gender. Only in the final chapter is there a ray of hope. When Mary lifts her voice in song, her pub audience listens. So, too, O’Brien evidently hopes, her own voice will eventually be heard in her native land. Sources for Further Study. CLXXVII, October 4, 1997, p. 35. Boston Globe.

A few years ago, Ireland was forced to confront its conscience when a 14-year-old girl, the purported victim of rape, sought an abortion in England. They say the curse of the Irish is the drink. But to understand your own brutal, beautiful country as well as Edna O'Brien understands hers must be a bigger curse by far. There's no way a blessed person could have written a novel as shimmering, as ruthless and as devastating as "Down by the River": it's evidence of something more than mere talent, or even genius, at work.

Edna O'Brien is the author of 19 books. She was the winner of the 1993 Writers' Guild Prize for Fiction. Her biography of James Joyce was published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson in June 1999. Her recent fiction has been about Irish to;pic - religion, politics, property. In 2001 her documentary novel, In the Forest - about a brutal murder on the west coast - caused a furore in her native Ireland. It was the subject of a BBC Omnibus film. Country of Publication.

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Set in the author's native Ireland, a powerful and passionate novel relates the story of a young girl who becomes pregnant by her father, a situation made worse when it becomes fodder for the mill of church, state, and the town square. Tour.
Comments: (7)
Via
This book threw me for a loop I didn't know what I was getting into reading this one. But it was worth reading the one time don't know if I could do it again.
showtime
Edna O'Brien captures the Irish time and place exactly. Poignant. Great descriptions.
Doulkree
I'm not here to recount the plot. I just wanted to say that this novel IS worth sticking with, even though O'Brien's style may not be for everyone. Honestly, I was really put off during the first 50 pgs. or so. As some other reviewers have mentioned, it's often difficult to tell which character is speaking in this novel. Sometimes, I'd find myself going back to prior chapters just to see if the character I was reading about had been introduced earlier. As the novel goes on, more and more characters are introduced, some who are only discussed for a mere two or three pages. This may sound annoying, but the pace of the novel is so intense and the story so riveting that I truly forgot about these "pet peeves" after awhile. I raced through this book in about three days, but if you're a fast reader, you could probably devour it in one sitting.

Any writer who can weave a story in such a compelling way that its characters infuriate me is a great writer in my opinion. O'Brien perfectly depicts religious fanatics, stubborn Irish citizens who label a rape victim as a whore, and the community members outraged by the rape and the events caused by it. We also get glimpses into the mind of Mary, the victim whose unwanted pregnancy has caused such a stir. This gives the reader a chance to look at the issues from all angles, and it makes for a truly well-rounded reading experience. I learned of O'Brien's work through an Irish Lit. class in college, a class during which we only read her short stories. Just as O'Brien's short stories don't disappoint, neither does her novel. I highly recommend it!
Ger
Mary McNamara's life in rural western Ireland is that of a typical young teenager until one day while she is on a walk on their land, her father violates the most sacred bond between parent and child and rapes her. Unable to tell anyone, she keeps the secret, except for her diary entries. When the abuse results in an unwanted pregnancy, it precipitates a national crises when she is taken to England for an abortion.
Based on real events, this novel accurately portrays how a Catholic nation can be inflamed over a cause such at this even while the morality of the citizens is in decline as evidenced by premarital sex, living in sin, affairs, and out of wedlock births.
While I enjoyed the story of Mary's plight, the novel itself was often times confusing with so many characters and shifts in focus so that after awhile you sort of lost track of who was who. By the end I was thinking it could have been told in a much more straightforward manner in less pages.
Mary's father, James, the obvious villan in this book, is a tragic figure. He seems a contradictory character, gentle with his livestock, proud of his daughter's accomplishments at school, and missing her presence, even while he violates her. Without a wife to serve his needs, it seems Mary is to fulfill that role on all counts. In the end it is hard to feel much more than pity for this pathetic nature.
Mary, for being all of fourteen, seems stronger than either of her parents in enduring the many hardhsips and allowing herself to be used by different fractions for their own purposes. It is hard to imagine what her life would be like afterwards, though the last pages try to give us a glimpse of her new life.
Otiel
In DOWN BY THE RIVER O'Brien one of the more prevalent themes is the treatment of Mary. When everyone finds out she has went to get an abortion, people automatically assume she is a tramp, and this O'Brien portrays how someone can become so set pregnancy is a result of her "wild youthful ways." in their veiws that you fail to gain the facts before rushing to a judgement. Few people bothered to ask Mary is this pregnancy was a result of bad judgement, or a result of someone else's forceful and abusvie actions. O'Brien didn't really the reader a deep insight to how Mary may have felt as the subject of this fierce national debate. It's almost like Mary wasn't allowed to feel, or she was afraid to feel scared, frightened, angry, ashamed, fearful. Few people bothered to find out how Mary felt, it was more about what she was going to or had already attempted to do. O'Brien portrays that the characters became more concerned with the issue itself, than with the person which the issue was about and her feelings.
Benn
This book was a disappointment to me, primarily because of several annoying techniques used by the author. First of all, she tries too hard to be poetic and the result is a book that ties itself up in knots of extraneous text. The story suffers from an excess of flowery verse and a lack of direct language. At times we read sentence after sentence which contain no verbs. (e.g., "Soft morning crisp. Starched low-lying lawns ...") At the beginning of one chapter we do not encounter a verb until the 12th sentence.
At other times, the story becomes confusing because the author refuses to call characters or items by name, preferring to refer to them as "he", "she", or "it" when these words could easily apply to several characters or objects. For example, instead of saying "Mary picked up the letter", the author will simply say "She picked it up", and the reader is forced to become Sherlock Holmes just to figure out what the author is talking about. Who is "she"?? What is "it"??? I asked these questions to myself many times while reading this book. Perhaps the author thought such imprecise references sounded more artistic. I was not impressed.
In addition to the flawed writing style, the story itself is rather narrow. Only one character (Mary) is treated as a sympathetic figure, the others being dull and one-dimensional. It was a struggle for me to finish the book, since I really didn't care about most of the characters.
This book could have been much better since the subject matter is timely and intriguing. It's a shame the author overreached so badly.