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eBook Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, Vol. 2 download

by Maurice Balme

eBook Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, Vol. 2 download ISBN: 0195149572
Author: Maurice Balme
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 2 edition (July 3, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 400
ePub: 1808 kb
Fb2: 1450 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: txt mobi lit mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Combining the best features of traditional and modern methods, Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, 2/e, provides a unique course of instruction that allows students to read connected Greek narrative right from the beginning and guides them to the point where they can begin reading.

Combining the best features of traditional and modern methods, Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, 2/e, provides a unique course of instruction that allows students to read connected Greek narrative right from the beginning and guides them to the point where they can begin reading complete classical texts. Carefully designed to hold students' interest, the course begins in Book I with a fictional narrative about an Attic farmer's family placed in a precise historical context (432-431 .

Combining the best features of traditional and modern methods, Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, 2/e, provides a unique course of instruction that allows students to read connected Greek narrative right from the beginning and guides them to the point where they can begin reading.

Combining the best features of traditional and modern methods, Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, 2/e provides a unique course of instruction that allows students to read connected Greek narrative right from the beginning and guides them to the point where they can begin reading complete classical texts.

Designed to accompany the corresponding student's textbook, this volume contains the full English translations of all exercises. The "Athenaze" course aims to promote the fluent reading of ancient Greek through a series of exercises, grammatical explanations and essays on culture and history.

Maurice Balme/Gilbert Lawall. All Documents from Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, Vol. 2. candaule 2019-05-02. Get started today for free. completive 2019-04-16. parole ripasso fino al 20 2019-02-20. vocaboli per il rientro al ginnasio 2017-09-02. principle parts list 6 2013-11-12. ancient greek chapter 05 2013-02-03.

Maurice Balme, Gilbert Lawall, and James Morwood. Publication Date - December 2015. Combining the best features of traditional and modern methods, Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek 3/e, provides a unique, bestselling course of instruction that allows students to read connected Greek narrative right from the begining and guides them to the point where they can begin reading complete classical texts.

Essays on relevant aspects of ancient Greek culture and history are also woven throughout

Essays on relevant aspects of ancient Greek culture and history are also woven throughout.

Athenaze is a story driven classical Greek grammar from Oxford University Press. This site offers additional resources for using this grammar to learn Greek with a historical Koine pronunciation system. It is a fantastic resource for learning biblical Greek. Learn More Get Started. Getting Set Up. This is the introductory material that you must learn (such as the alphabet) before starting on the chapters.

introduced, so Balme, M. G, that the future tense and the passive voice are now introduced in Book I Athenaze : an introduction to ancient Greek, Book I I Maurice Balme and Gilbert Lawall and the first three principal parts of verbs are now listed from Chapter 10, ; with drawings by Catherine Balme. Maurice Balme and Gilbert Lawall Printing number: 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 Printed in the United States of America on acid-free paper CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ix Readings Grammar 1 0 A1KAlOlIOAIl: (a) 2 1. Verb Forms: Stems and Endings 4 2. Nouns: Genders, Stems, End セ@ ings, Cases, and Agreement 4 3. Labeling Functions of Words in Sentences.

I look upon Balme & Lawall's introductory classical Greek text, Athenaze, as a single work that happens to be published in two volumes

Combining the best features of traditional and modern methods, Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, 2/e, provides a unique course of instruction that allows students to read connected Greek narrative right from the beginning and guides them to the point where they can begin reading complete classical texts. Carefully designed to hold students' interest, the course begins in Book I with a fictional narrative about an Attic farmer's family placed in a precise historical context (432-431 B.C.). This narrative, interwoven with tales from mythology and the Persian Wars, gradually gives way in Book II to adapted passages from Thucydides, Plato, and Herodotus and ultimately to excerpts of the original Greek of Bacchylides, Thucydides, and Aristophanes' Acharnians. Essays on relevant aspects of ancient Greek culture and history are also provided. New to the Second Edition: * Short passages from Classical and New Testament Greek in virtually every chapter * The opening lines of the Iliad and the Odyssey toward the end of Book II * New vocabulary and more complete explanations of grammar, including material on accents * Many new exercises and additional opportunities for students to practice completing charts of verb forms and paradigms of nouns and adjectives * Updated Teacher's Handbooks for Books I and II containing translations of all stories, readings, and exercises; detailed suggestions for classroom presentation; abundant English derivatives; and additional linguistic information * Offered for the first time, Student Workbooks for Books I and II that include self-correcting exercises, cumulative vocabulary lists, periodic grammatical reviews, and additional readings
Comments: (7)
Charyoll
I am a PhD Philosophy student who was learning Ancient Greek in order to read ancient philosophy. Although Ancient Greek is the third language I've studied, it presented a much more complex grammar than I had encountered before, and certain unique difficulties for learning. I had tried two other books before this one, as well as auditing a class at Stanford, but was frustrated with my lack of progress. This book helped me get through the initial stages of learning, to a more comfortable level.

I felt that this book succeeded where others fails largely because, instead of giving the beginning student snippets of various ancient works to translate, the authors wrote a simple story about a farmer's life that builds slowly as it introduces new grammatical concepts and vocabulary. It was therefore possible to learn words through repetition and figure things out from context, something I was unable to do with other books. This doesn't come at the expense of reading real Ancient Greek, however, because as the book progresses you are also given some excerpts from ancient texts. (By the second volume of this book, these sections are quite lengthy) The presentation of grammar and vocabulary was straightforward, and the pace at which you are introduced to new concepts I found to be reasonable. (Unlike some other texts where you are simply thrown paradigm after paradigm with little chance to practice.)

This book is best used along with the workbook, which provides even more chance for practice, as well as some additional vocabulary that isn't in the textbook. There is also a second volume of this work and another workbook, which covers intermediate to advanced levels.
Walianirv
My opinion of Athenaze is almost entirely positive. By presenting in ancient language through simple passages connected by a single plot, the book gives a the student a reason to read, a reason to study. This is especially helpful in self-study, where there is no teacher encouraging or rewarding progress.

Furthermore, Athenaze offers many passages from classical Greek and biblical sources, introducing the reader to "real" Greek grammar.

Where Athenaze fails, it is small, insignificant matters: examples weren't given for all verb-types in this tense, this noun has an odd declension that isn't fully explained, etc.

By the end of Book 1, the student can expect a vocabulary of a few hundred words, and the ability to speak in present, future, aorist (past), and imperfect tenses.

Because Amazon will not let me review the Athenaze Workbook for Book 1, I will add my comments below...

For the self-study, the workbook proves amazingly encouraging. It demands additional activity on the student's part, providing supplementary practice and reading that might ordinarily be given by a formal teacher.

All of the stories in the workbook complement those in the actual textbook, though all of them feel miscellaneous, like lost episodes of a sitcom.

Overall, the workbook, like the textbook, is very well-designed.

Another helpful aspect of Athenaze study is the helpfulness of online resources. A simple search of 'Athenaze' produces several sites with supplementary practice activities, some free and others at a fee. I have only tried the free ones, and these alone are very helpful.
Tuliancel
I used both book I & II (along with a resource called The Perseus Project [...] which is a FREE collection of original texts & translations) in college and of all the languages I've studied I found Ancient Greek to be one of the easiest to learn, despite its difficulty, because of this wonderful textbook. The layout is straightforward, and simple. It gives many exorcises for passive and active translation. It explains the grammatical concepts well and provides a great dictionary in the back pages along with pages of tables for quick reference (the ones in this text I think are presented better than those in the Oxford Grammar Reference, especially for verbs). It is an ideal book for either a student learning in a classroom setting or someone learning on their own.

If all you want is to gain a basic understanding of Ancient Greek and the ability to do passive translation, the is almost all you'll need (except for a general dictionary once you get more into it.)

If you want to study the language extensively this is a good starting point. I have been studying Greek for around 4 years now, having progressed enough to do independent translations of actual texts, and I still use these books to review with.

In addition to this I would recommend getting/using:

The Perseus Project (This is a collection of FREE texts, maintained by Tufts University, with English translations, as well as books on grammar, etc. Each Greek word is hyperlinked and clicking on one it takes you to the dictionary entry that lists what exact case/declension/other grammatical identifiers. There is also a feature that allows you to view the original text and the English translation side by side. And it also has Latin texts) [...]

Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek
Pocket Oxford Classical Greek Dictionary
Greek Key Words: The Basic 2, 000 Word Vocabulary Arranged by Frequency in a Hundred Units, with Comprehensive Greek and English Indexes
Lexical Aids for Students of New Testament Greek (this has some very good charts in the Appendices, especially one of prepositions)
An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon: Founded upon the Seventh Edition of Liddell and Scott's Greek-English Lexicon
Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek (Workbook II)