carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Retext: Late Medieval Literacies and Multilingualism (Late Medieval and Early Modern Studies)

eBook Retext: Late Medieval Literacies and Multilingualism (Late Medieval and Early Modern Studies) download

by Mark Amsler

eBook Retext: Late Medieval Literacies and Multilingualism (Late Medieval and Early Modern Studies) download ISBN: 2503532365
Author: Mark Amsler
Publisher: Brepols (distributed) (December 31, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 348
ePub: 1983 kb
Fb2: 1675 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mbr lit lrf lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Adapting critical approaches and concepts from New Literacy Studies, historical sociolinguistics, and close reading, Amsler analyses how late medieval writing and literacies in Latin, English, and French 'make people.

Adapting critical approaches and concepts from New Literacy Studies, historical sociolinguistics, and close reading, Amsler analyses how late medieval writing and literacies in Latin, English, and French 'make people up' to create literate subjects and . Adapting critical approaches and concepts from New Literacy Studies, historical sociolinguistics, and close reading, Amsler analyses how late medieval writing and literacies in Latin, English, and French 'make people up' to create literate subjects and agents (readers and writers) in multilingual manuscript cultures.

Drawing on Brian Street’s study of cross-cultural literacies, Amsler argues that .

Drawing on Brian Street’s study of cross-cultural literacies, Amsler argues that literacies are always situated and socially constructed  . Retexting as a concept foregrounds Amsler’s main argument of the transgressive or deconstructive acts of medieval textuality, which reshape the hyperliterate network, that is, the dominant ideological authority involved in literate discourse in the Middle Ages.

Late Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 19. Turnhout: Brepols, 2011. Thinking Medieval: An Introduction to the Study of the Middle Ages. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire, and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. Geschichte als historische Anthropologie. In Geschichte des Mittelalters für unsere Zeit: Erträge des Kongresses des Verbandes der Geschichtslehrer Deutschlands Geschichte des Mittelalters im Quedlinburg 2. 23. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2003, pp. 63–85.

Recent papers in Late Medieval & Early Modern Dutch Literature. In our opinion, studies on the relation between prophetism and the New World had mainly been monopolised by central figures such as Columbus or Menasseh ben Israel

Recent papers in Late Medieval & Early Modern Dutch Literature. In our opinion, studies on the relation between prophetism and the New World had mainly been monopolised by central figures such as Columbus or Menasseh ben Israel. We believe that there are several aspects that need to be further explained. The aim of these panels is to shed some light on the several trends of prophetism in Early Modern History, explaining what this word meant and how it overlapped different religions and worlds. Finally, the panels put into perspective recent and different studies on prophetism and the New World.

Europe (Katalin Szende); Medieval Human-Animal Interactions (Alice Choyke); Medieval Monasticism (Jozsef .

Want to learn more about late medieval printed texts? Join us this afternoon for Dr Holly James-Maddock’s . This two-day event celebrates Medieval and Early Modern history, with speakers topics ranging from 800 - 1850.

Want to learn more about late medieval printed texts? Join us this afternoon for Dr Holly James-Maddock’s paper on ‘Early Printed Books Illuminated in England (. 455-1500). We’ll see you later today at 4:15pm in DLT1 - the more the merrier! ‬ Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS). Join us in Canterbury for the University of Kent’s fifth annual MEMS Summer Festival.

The Late Middle Ages or Late Medieval Period was the period of European history lasting from 1250 to 1500 AD. The Late Middle Ages followed the High Middle Ages and preceded the onset of the early modern period (and in much of Europe, the Renaissance. The Late Middle Ages followed the High Middle Ages and preceded the onset of the early modern period (and in much of Europe, the Renaissance). Around 1300, centuries of prosperity and growth in Europe came to a halt. A series of famines and plagues, including the Great Famine of 1315–1317 and the Black Death, reduced the population to around half of what it was before the calamities.

A Journal of Medieval Studies. Volume 89, Number 1 January 2014. Mark Amsler, Affective Literacies: Writing and Multilingualism in the Late Middle Ages. Late Medieval and Early Modern Studies 1. Pp. xxv, 421; 5 black-and-white figures and 5 color plates.

Affective Literacies book. New Literacy Studies, close reading, and historical sociolinguistics inform Amsler's analyses of late medieval writing and textual cultures. New Literacy Studies, close reading, and historical sociolinguistics. Start by marking Affective Literacies: Writing and Multilingualism in the Late Middle Ages as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Medieval and Renaissance Court Cultures. Medieval Church Studies. Jointly directed by scholars from the University of Melbourne and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, this series covers the historical period in Western and Central Europe from c. 1300 to c. 1650. It concentrates on topics of broad cultural, religious, intellectual and literary history.

Adapting critical approaches and concepts from New Literacy Studies, historical sociolinguistics, and close reading, Amsler analyses how late medieval writing and literacies in Latin, English, and French 'make people up' to create literate subjects and agents (readers and writers) in multilingual manuscript cultures. Amsler argues that textual interactions make sense only when we take the 'social turn' and examine reading and writing not as individual practices toward discrete texts, but as part of wider multilingual, socio-cultural practices that could either sustain or challenge dominant ideologies and reading formations. Rather than a singular Literacy, we see socially situated literacies. In late medieval society, both traditional and new literates assumed different relationships between and among Latin, the vernaculars, and hybrid written forms. Amsler explores the intertextualities and social contests embedded in these forms, bringing new historical dimensions to literacy studies. The individual chapters in this volume examine literacies as cultural practice in elite and popular texts and also in schooling. They consider texts by Chaucer, Christine de Pizan, Dante, Margery Kempe, devotional writers, Erasmus, and the Jewish convert Hermann of Scheda alongside grammatical writing, mythography, charms, drama, and educational texts. This volume sets individual Latin and vernacular works within historical and linguistic contexts, which illustrates the diversity of late medieval multilingual writing, performance, and embodied reading.