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eBook Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift (Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity) download

by Cristina Malcolmson

eBook Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift (Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity) download ISBN: 0754637786
Author: Cristina Malcolmson
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (August 15, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 248
ePub: 1319 kb
Fb2: 1366 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf doc rtf azw
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence .

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Cristina Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the Society. ELH 6. (1997) 447-471 The fathers of early modern science did not wait for their descendants to write their myth of origins: from Bacon's proclamation in 1620 "to commence a total reconstruction o. .all human knowledge" to Thomas Sprat's boast nearly half a century later that the members of the Royal Society had, for the first time, rendered "the.

the Society’s emphasis on skin color. Shortlisted for the British Society for Literature and Science book prize, 2013.

and eighteenth-century science, commerce, colonialism, and slavery; and, perhaps more importantly, the unique capacity of literary works to -Jonathan Reinarz, Director of the History of Medicine Unit interrogate such bonds. the Society’s emphasis on skin color.

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and . PRIZE: Shortlisted for the British Society for Literature and Science Book Prize 2013 offers an original, nuanced, and deeply compelling. She also brings new light to the relationship between early modern literature, science, and the establishment of scientific racism in the nineteenth century. PRIZE: Shortlisted for the British Society for Literature and Science Book Prize 2013 offers an original, nuanced, and deeply compelling investigation into the pre-history of modern understandings of race.

Special Offer from Ashgate Publishing Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society Boyle, Cavendish .

Special Offer from Ashgate Publishing Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society Boyle, Cavendish, Swift Cristina Malcolmson, Bates College Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity I have already recommended this volume to colleagues working in the Studies of Skin Color is an impressive addition to Ashgate’s excellent field of history of medicine and scientific biography, but would further ‘Literary.

Malcolmson's book is noteworthy for its clear argument, its excellent use of literary sources, its creative gender .

Malcolmson's book is noteworthy for its clear argument, its excellent use of literary sources, its creative gender analysis, and its status as a metropolitan history in light of Atlantic studies. The author clearly shows how the Royal Society made skin color an important topic of study and discussion in the seventeenth century, how this interest served the colonial agenda of England at the time, and how this focus influenced the elaboration of race.

Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift. Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity. Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, xii + 233 p. 3 illustr. Anglia - Zeitschrift für englische Philologie, January 2015, De Gruyter. DOI: 1. 515/ang-2015-0069. The authors haven't yet claimed this publication. PDF generated on 10-Nov-2019 Create your own PDF.

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Cristina Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the Society

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Cristina Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the Society.

DOI :1. 093/res/hgu012. Copy DOI. Matthew Risling (U of T: University of Toronto).

Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity. Taylor & Francis Ltd (Sales), Routledge.

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Cristina Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the Society. She also brings new light to the relationship between early modern literature, science, and the establishment of scientific racism in the nineteenth century. Malcolmson demonstrates how unstable the idea of race remained in England at the end of the seventeenth century, and yet how extensively the intertwined institutions of government, colonialism, the slave trade, and science were collaborating to usher it into public view. Malcolmson places the genre of the voyage to the moon in the context of early modern discourses about human difference, and argues that Cavendish’s Blazing World and Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels satirize the Society’s emphasis on skin color.