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eBook African Underclass: Urbanisation, Crime and Colonial Order in Dar es Salaam, 1919-61 (Eastern African Studies) download

by Andrew Burton

eBook African Underclass: Urbanisation, Crime and Colonial Order in Dar es Salaam, 1919-61 (Eastern African Studies) download ISBN: 0852559763
Author: Andrew Burton
Publisher: James Currey (November 17, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 176
ePub: 1601 kb
Fb2: 1390 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: docx rtf txt lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Andrew Burton's study of the 'wahuni' of Dar es Salaam is grounded in this genre. The first section reveals that.

Andrew Burton's study of the 'wahuni' of Dar es Salaam is grounded in this genre. According to Burton, wahuni could best be translated 'hooligans' – young bachelors seen as unemployed, lawless wastrels and gadabouts (. ). The monograph documents how these youthful men – who were most prevalent in the migration flow into the city -were marginalised to the point of criminalisation and equated with 'demographic degeneration'.

The origins of an often coercive response to urbanization in postcolonial Tanzania are traced back to the colonial period. The British reacted to unanticipated urban growth by attempting to limit the process.

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This is an original contribution to Tanzanian, and more broadly, African social history; to the scholarship on the colonial state; and to historiography on crime and urbanisation.

Recommend this journal.

A. Burton and P. Ocobock (2008) ‘The Traveling Native: Vagrancy and Colonial Control in British East Africa’ in . In: Campion . Rousseaux X. (eds) Policing New Risks in Modern European History. World Histories of Crime, Culture and Violence.

Examines the social, political and administrative repercussions of rapid urbanisation in colonial Dar es Salaam, and the evolution of an official policy which viewed urbanisation as inextricably linked with social disorder. This is an original contribution to Tanzanian, and more broadly, African social history; to the scholarship on the colonial state; and to historiography on crime and urbanisation. ANDREW BURTON was assistant director of The British Institute in Eastern Africa Published in association with The British Institute in Eastern Africa North America: Ohio U Press; Uganda: Fountain Publishers; Kenya: EAEP