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by Joseph Addison

eBook Addison's Essays from the Spectator download ISBN: 0543721876
Author: Joseph Addison
Publisher: Adamant Media Corporation (February 23, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 592
ePub: 1157 kb
Fb2: 1745 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: doc lit txt lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Joseph Addison (1 May 1672 – 17 June 1719) was an English essayist, poet, playwright and politician. He was the eldest son of The Reverend Lancelot Addison

Joseph Addison (1 May 1672 – 17 June 1719) was an English essayist, poet, playwright and politician. He was the eldest son of The Reverend Lancelot Addison. His name is usually remembered alongside that of his long-standing friend Richard Steele, with whom he founded The Spectator magazine. Addison was born in Milston, Wiltshire, but soon after his birth his father, Lancelot Addison, was appointed Dean of Lichfield and the family moved into the cathedral close.

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The Spectator, with Illustrative Notes

The Spectator, Volume 3. Richard Steele, Joseph Addison. The Spectator, with Illustrative Notes. to Which Are Prefixed the Lives of the Authors; Comprehending Joseph Addison with Critical Remarks on Their Respective Writings Volume 4. Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, Robert Bisset. Works; Complete in Three Volumes, Embracing the Whole of the Spectator, Etc Volume 3. Joseph Addison.

Joseph Addison essaysJoseph Addison: A Man with a vision Joseph Addison's work in "The Spectator . Joseph Andrews In Fielding's Joseph Andrews you see a variety of characters

Joseph Addison essaysJoseph Addison: A Man with a vision Joseph Addison's work in "The Spectator," endeavors to convey the importance of morality in conjunction with honorable literature. Joseph Andrews In Fielding's Joseph Andrews you see a variety of characters. They range from the shallow, vain and proud characters like Lady Booby and Mrs. Slipslop to the innocent, sincere, and virtuous like Joseph and Fanny.

Complete summary of Joseph Addison, Richard Steele's The Spectator

Complete summary of Joseph Addison, Richard Steele's The Spectator. eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of The Spectator. The Spectator was a daily periodical written and published by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele What was Joseph Addison's "Party Patches" essay about in The Spectator, No. 81? Joseph Addison's essay on "Party Patches," published in The Specator, No. 81, on June 2, 1711, just a few months after he started the magazine in March, 1711, is his attempt to poke fun at . .

The essays were selected from The Spectator, the magazine founded by Addison and Richard Steele, which . Originally published in 1909, this book contains a selection of essays by the English man of letters and politician Joseph Addison (1672-1719).

The essays were selected from The Spectator, the magazine founded by Addison and Richard Steele, which ran from 1711 to 1712. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the writings of Addison and The Spectator. The essays were selected from The Spectator, the magazine founded by Addison and Richard Steele, which ran from 1711 to 1712.

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Addison went to the famous Charterhouse School in London, where he met Steele The Tatler paper contained not only political news, but also gossip from the clubs and coffee houses, with some light essays on the life and manners of the age.

Addison went to the famous Charterhouse School in London, where he met Steele. The Tatler paper contained not only political news, but also gossip from the clubs and coffee houses, with some light essays on the life and manners of the age.

Joseph Addison seems to have been identified early on as someone who would .

Joseph Addison seems to have been identified early on as someone who would have a significant public career. After finishing his degree at Oxford, he was sent on a grand tour of the continent at government expense, and would go on to be a member of Parliament (he was essentially given a seat there; he did not have to campaign) and a cabinet minister. Here Addison took the lead, contributing a larger number of essays than Steele and, most scholars agree, setting the tone for the new journal. A set of the Tatlers and the Spectators was something that every middle-class household with aspirations to looking like its members took literature seriously would want to have.

This Elibron Classics book is a facsimile reprint of a 1870 edition by William Tegg, London.
Comments: (2)
Ungall
I did buy this book as I found a reference to Allison in Noah Wesbter's 1826 dictionary as one of the best example of English language writings. English is my 2nd language and I sometimes sound like a f... foreigner. So I bought the Essays (written in 1500's) to educate myself in the use of proper English. To my surprise I also liked the content of the essays!

The sentences are also very beautiful and Noah Websters was right!. The sentences Allison uses in his Spector are mostly 4 - 6 lines long and with clever clauses convey an incredible acurate picture of what he, as the writer intended to say. I plan to make good useage of this in my own speech!
Anarus
The audience for both The Tattler and The Spectator was vastly different from the one just a generation or two ago. This difference reflects a multitude of changes in society, government, science, and the daily harsh grind of contemporary life. This harshness is a not widely known offshoot of the rationalism that marked the age. When life is harsh, so is one's attitude toward it. Child mortality was high. Tuberculosis was rampant. The typical lifespan was under forty. Life, therefore, was lived with compensatory rawness and exuberance. Gambling and alcoholism were rampant at all strata of society but one and that one was the middle class, which watched disgustedly as those above and below wallowed in a brief life of seaminess, squalidness, and sordidness. The middle class maintained a pious austerity, partly due to its stern Puritan background and partly from its relentless struggle to survive, knowing that no help would be forthcoming from any quarter.

Except for this growing middle class, nearly all commoners were conveniently ignored both in the literature and by Parliament. The nation was ruled mostly by an unspoken alliance among the propertied class, the merchant princes, and the landed gentry. The term "gentleman" was limited to the small leisure class who had the time, money, or patronage and could concentrate upon politics, leisure, and the arts. Religious fanatics were a rarity. The Sturm und Drang that afflicted Germany was largely avoided in England since the ruling landed gentry had the good sense to remain moderate, flexible, responsible, and committed to choosing reasonably competent rulers. Such were the majority of the readers of The Tattler and The Spectator.

It is reasonable to assume that most people like to read about others much like themselves. Therefore, Addison and Steele made sure to fill the pages of both journals with characters with whom their readers could relate. In The Spectator #2, Steele wrote of a selected group of five men who not only represented a cross section of this newly-minted upwardly mobile middle class, but in their order of representation, Steele could subliminally strengthen the social order of the day. As Chaucer was to do in his Canterbury Tales, Steele would introduce each gentleman by rank. He began with Sir Roger de Coverly, the country squire who was the bedrock of landed gentry. Second was the Templar, a man who knew the law as well as he did the classics and the theater. Third, was Sir Andrew Freeport, who in his business acumen combined the best virtues of English mercantilism. Fourth, was the retired soldier, Captain Sentry, whose very name suggested his diligence as a steadfast officer. And last, was Will Honeycomb, the gallant and fop.

As Steele wrote of these exemplars of English society, he did so in a way that guaranteed that his readers would continue to buy the next issue. Each one was not merely an abstract symbol of their social station, but Steele portrayed them as having fully fleshed qualities that any normal man might have and could appreciate in others. Sir Roger, for example, was often mentioned as having an unhappy and unfulfilling romance with a "Perverse beautiful Widow." Sir Andrew Freeport was described in a way that Charles Dickens would later use--tagging his characters with representative quirks or sayings. Freeport was fond of maxims that tended to make Englishmen proud of their industriousness. "Sloth has ruined more Nations than the Sword" was a typical example. And Will Honeycomb knew in detail all the latest gossip of which Royal Lady was sleeping with whomever. Salacious gossip, it seems, was as relevant then as The National Enquirer proves now.

Thus, the readers of The Tattler and The Spectator differed from readers of today only in superficial ways. The tags that we moderns like to assess to the Augustans--courtliness, restraint, elegance, urbanity, and wit--are as likely to be prized in any age. And if Steele and Addison managed to appeal to his readers using these traits, then it is not difficult to know why even now readers still get pleasure in reading of the foibles and gossip of an age long past.