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by Julia Sun-Joo Lee

eBook The American Slave Narrative and the Victorian Novel download ISBN: 0195390326
Author: Julia Sun-Joo Lee
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (April 9, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 202
ePub: 1477 kb
Fb2: 1830 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt doc lrf mobi
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Julia Sun-Joo Lee makes the case for the influence of American slavery and the slave narrative on the Victorian novel.

Julia Sun-Joo Lee makes the case for the influence of American slavery and the slave narrative on the Victorian novel. -Audrey Fisch, author of American Slaves in Victorian England. Fresh and surefooted, Julia Sun-Joo Lee's book does what no other book has done before: it presents the American slave narrative as a point of origin for English narratives of dissent, resistance, and freedom

Lee Julia Sun-Joo (EN). Conceived as a literary form to aggressively publicize the abolitionist cause in the United States, the African American slave narrative remains a powerful and illuminating demonstration of America's dark history

Lee Julia Sun-Joo (EN). Conceived as a literary form to aggressively publicize the abolitionist cause in the United States, the African American slave narrative remains a powerful and illuminating demonstration of America's dark history.

Julia Sun-Joo Lee argues that novelists such as Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Charles Dickens integrated into their works generic elements of the slave narrative-from the emphasis on literacy as a tool of liberation, to the teleological journey from slavery to freedom, to the ethics o. .

Julia Sun-Joo Lee argues that novelists such as Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Charles Dickens integrated into their works generic elements of the slave narrative-from the emphasis on literacy as a tool of liberation, to the teleological journey from slavery to freedom, to the ethics of resistance over submission.

This chapter examines the relation between American slave narratives and Catholic ideology, focusing on the works of John LaFarge and W. E. B. Du Bois.

The American Slave Narrative and the Victorian Novel, by Julia Sun-Joo Lee. January 2011 · Victorian Studies. The slave narrative and the stamp act, or letters from two American farmers in Pennsylvania. This chapter examines the relation between American slave narratives and Catholic ideology, focusing on the works of John LaFarge and W. It explains that although the cultural significance of religion within America is a massively complex and important subject, its significance has generally been undervalued in recent years, partly because the old pressures of identity politics.

This Companion examines the slave narrative's relation to British and American abolitionism, Anglo-American literary traditions such as autobiography and sentimental literature, and the larger African American literary tradition. Special attention is paid to leading exponents of the genre such as Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, as well as many other, less well known examples. Further essays explore the rediscovery of the slave narrative and its subsequent critical reception, as well as the uses to which the genre is put by modern authors such as Toni Morrison.

Free eBook The American Slave Narrative and the Victorian Novel by Julia Sun-Joo Lee across multiple file-formats . This kind of The American Slave Narrative and the Victorian Novel without we recognize teach the one who looking at it become critical in imagining and analyzing.

This kind of The American Slave Narrative and the Victorian Novel without we recognize teach the one who looking at it become critical in imagining and analyzing.

Yet considering the heterogeneous origins of American slave narratives and the preceding body of writings on slavery in Britain, one might ask how many markers of the American slave narrative must stamp . The American Slave Narative and the Victorian Novel.

Yet considering the heterogeneous origins of American slave narratives and the preceding body of writings on slavery in Britain, one might ask how many markers of the American slave narrative must stamp the target text to justify a reasonable case for correspondence. Unless the intertextual reference is explicit or is elsewhere mentioned by the authors or their contemporaries, direct influence of one text on another, or even, as here, of a body of writing on a novel or story is notoriously difficult to prove. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.

July 29, 2014 History. Julia Sun-Joo Lee. The American slave narrative and the Victorian novel. The slave narrative of Jane Eyre. Slaves and brothers in Pendennis. Female slave narratives: "The grey woman" and My Lady Ludlow.

Conceived as a literary form to aggressively publicize the abolitionist cause in the United States, the African American slave narrative remains a powerful and illuminating demonstration of America's dark history. Yet the genre's impact extended far beyond the borders of the U.S. In a period when few books sold more than five hundred copies, slave narratives sold in the tens of thousands, providing British readers vivid accounts of the violence and privation experienced by American slaves. Eloquent, bracing narratives by Frederick Douglass, William Box Brown, Solomon Northrop, and others enjoyed unprecedented popularity, captivating audiences that included activists, journalists, and some of the era's greatest novelists.The American Slave Narrative and the Victorian Novel investigates the shaping influence of the American slave narrative on the Victorian novel in the years between the British Abolition Act and the American Emancipation Proclamation. The book argues that Charlotte Brontë, W. M. Thackeray, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens, and Fanny and Robert Louis Stevenson integrated into their works generic elements of the slave narrative-from the emphasis on literacy as a tool of liberation, to the teleological journey from slavery to freedom, to the ethics of resistance over submission. It contends that Victorian novelists used these tropes in an attempt to access the slave narrative's paradigm of resistance, illuminate the transnational dimension of slavery, and articulate Britain's role in the global community. Through a deft use of disparate sources, Lee reveals how the slave narrative becomes part of the textual network of the English novel, making visible how black literary, as well as economic, production contributed to English culture.Lucidly written, richly researched, and cogently argued, Julia Sun-Joo Lee's insightful monograph makes an invaluable contribution to scholars of American literary history, African American literature, and the Victorian novel, in addition to highlighting the vibrant transatlantic exchange of ideas that illuminated literatures on both sides of the Atlantic during the nineteenth century.